MISCELLANEOUS, Mumbai

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  • Revisiting in Jan 2014
    Revisiting in Jan 2014
    by MM212
  • MISCELLANEOUS
    by mamtap
  • Interior, Jan 2014
    Interior, Jan 2014
    by MM212
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    Most expensive home in the world!

    by mamtap Updated May 15, 2014

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    India's richest man Mukesh Ambani's home, Antilia is located in Altamount Rd, Tardeo, Mumbai. The building is 27 stories high, but since some ceilings are of double height, it's closer to the size of a 40-story building and contains a multi storey garage with space for 168 cars. It also has three helipads on the roof.

    Antilia is named after a mythical island in the Atlantic Ocean.

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    • Road Trip
    • Family Travel

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    Bandra - Saint Andrew's Church

    by MM212 Updated Mar 10, 2014
    Saint Andrew's, Jan 2014
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    Located in the suburb of Bandra, Saint Andrew's Church is the oldest surviving church in Bombay. It was built in 1575 by Portuguese Jesuits who settled here when this area, then named Bandorah, was a Portuguese colony. Unlike most churches in Bandra which have often been rebuilt, Saint Andrews has survived natural disasters, wars, invasions, and urban expansion and looks today much as it did in the 16th century, save for some repairs and renovation. It continues to serve the Catholic community of Bandra, which I witnessed first hand when I visited in Jan 2014 during mass.

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    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

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    A MYSTICAL JOURNEY

    by Amitu Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Palace on Wheels Tour

    Duration: 8 days
    Rate: USD 2626 - Single traveler. USD 1999 - Twin sharing.

    This is the closest you can get to living like a maharajah. One of the top ten luxury train journeys in the world, The Palace on Wheels captures the aura and mysticism of a bygone era, while spoiling its guests with sheer luxurious royalty. 14 AC coaches, 2 restaurants with the most delicious of cuisine, well-stocked bars, lounges, personal khitmatgars, barber shop, beauty parlor and even a 'Bazaar'. They are beautiful carriages on which the Rajahs and the Nizams once moved in. Step into their world. Welcome to The Palace on Wheels.


    Itinerary - 8 days

    Day 1 Delhi (Dep. 1830 hrs)
    Arrive at Delhi Cantonment station at 1600 hrs.
    Day 2 (Arr. 0200 hrs | Dep. 1930 hrs)
    The first stop on this glorious ride is Jaipur.
    Day 3 Jaisalmer (Arr. 0815 hrs | Dep. 2300 hrs)
    Day 4 Jodhpur (Arr. 0700 hrs | Dep. 1530 hrs)
    Day 5 Sawai Madhopur – Chittaurgarh (Arr. 0400 hrs | Dep. 1030 hrs – Sawai Madhopur) (Arr. 1600 hrs - Chittaurgarh)
    Day 6 Udaipur – Chittaurgarh (Dep. 2000 hrs - Chittaurgarh)
    Day 7 Bharatpur – Agra (Arr. 0630 hrs | Dep. 1145 hrs - Bharatpur) (Arr. 1430 hrs | Dep. 2300 hrs - Agra)
    Day 8 Delhi (Arr. 0600 hrs)
    After a royal journey on the Palace-on-Wheels, arrive at Delhi Cantonment station at 0600 hrs for onward travel.

    Tour cost includes:
    - Cost of travel
    - Full catering (morning tea, breakfast, lunch, evening tea and dinner)
    - Conducted sightseeing tours in deluxe coaches Entrance fee for monuments/palaces
    - Cultural entertainment at Jaipur and Jaisalmer
    - Boat ride to and fro Lake Palace Hotel at Udaipur
    - Elephant ride at Jaipur, camel ride at Jaisalmer and rickshaw ride at Bharatpur

    Related to:
    • Adventure Travel

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    Bandra - Basilica of Mount Mary

    by MM212 Updated Mar 30, 2009

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    Basilica of Mount Mary - Feb 2009
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    One of the most beautiful and most popular churches in greater Bombay, the Basilica of Mount Mary serves the Catholic community. It is located on a hill with views of the Arabian Sea in the suburb of Bandra, just north of Bombay. The original basilica was built in 1640 by Portuguese Jesuits who called it Nossa Senhora de Monte, but it was destroyed when the Marathis invaded the area in 1739 to drive the Portuguese out. The church was rebuilt around 1760 by the Brits, and again in 1902 in the Gothic form we see today. The statue of the Virgin Mary in the interior of the church was brought to India in the 16th century by Portuguese Jesuits during the time when Bandra was a Portuguese colony. Take a look inside the church to admire its polychromatic decorations.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Architecture

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    Castella de Aguada (Bandra Fort)

    by MM212 Updated Mar 22, 2009

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    Castella de Aguada
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    Located at Land's End in the suburb of Bandra, this ruined fort was built by the Portuguese in 1640. They named it Castella de Aguada and used it to watch the seas for potential invaders and to protect Portuguese vessels sailing up the coast from Goa. With the decline of Portuguese power, local Marathas invaded the area in 1739 and occupied the Fort, but lost it to the British in 1761. The Fort was then destroyed to prevent it from being used once again by the Marathas as a launching pad to attack Bombay. Castella de Aguada is nowadays referred to as the Bandra Fort and has undergone some restoration and landscaping work to transform it into a beautiful park from which visitors could enjoy breathtaking views and sunsets over the Arabian Sea. The park seems to be a haven for young lovers seeking privacy away from their parents (see attached photos).

    Related to:
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    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

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    Shouldn't miss Kanheri Caves

    by RocknRolla Written Feb 16, 2009
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    Any one goin to Mumbai should pay a visit to the Kanheri caves at National Park in Borivali. Though there isn’t much to see in the national park but these caves are awesome. Especially if one is interested in archaeology this will be a treat. Reaching the National park is easy but its better to get a cab as the caves are a long way in the park. Trekking is possible but not advisable as the caves are on a mountain and u would need energy to climb the mountain.

    These caves were made by Buddhist monks centuries ago. There are few statues of Lord Buddha, a meditation hall etc. I just loved the small tanks carved in stone to store drinking water. The stairs cut on stone are just awesome. Once u r on the top of the mountain u’ll get an amazing view of the beautiful mangroves. You can enjoy this place in the rains as the best season to visit would be during Monsoons. But the roads to the caves will be messy and mucky.

    Avoid goin to isolated places as there have been instances where people were robbed by locals. As long as u have a guide with u, there shouldn’t be any trouble.

    Related to:
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    • Archeology

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    Middle Ground

    by Willettsworld Written Dec 16, 2007

    Middle Ground is an island in Mumbai Harbour which you'll pass by on your way to Elephant Island. It is fortified and owned by the Indian Navy. For a short while, the islet was used as a naval museum. The Maharashtra government had thought of anchoring the decommissioned INS Vikrant (now a naval museum) on this island.

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  • Discover Dharavi - Asias Biggest Slum

    by iwtgtj Written Dec 5, 2007
    In the middle of Dhavari

    This is a very different type of activity as most of you will imagine or have experienced. It is definitely off the beaten path, off the paved sidewalk.

    Reality Tours and Travel take you right into Dharavi, the biggest slum in Asia, but not for the purpose of sight seeing. The objective is to make you better understand the life of millions of Mumbaikers as they go about to make a living . Dharavi is actually more like a huge recycling factory ranging from recycling of plastic to recycling of oil containers. At the same time it provides shelter and work for hundred thousand families.

    Highly recommended.

    Sorry we were not allowed to take pictures inside so I just post a picture from the website of the travel agent.

    Related to:
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    • Singles

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    Kamshet - a village

    by mbatsheba Written Apr 4, 2007
    Sunset in Kamshet
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    This is a little village on the outskirts of Mumbai close to the hill station Lonavla. A typical Indian village...my pictures describe what I am saying.

    It is also a paragliders stop as there is an agent there who provides accomodation, food, transport etc. to the site

    Beautiful walks through this scenic village with a great lake.

    Private houses by the lake are normally rented out as there are no hotels available.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Adventure Travel
    • Hang Gliding

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    Construction - India style

    by HarShe Updated Nov 26, 2005
    Laughter the best medicine!
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    On a recent road trip from Mumbai to Pune, this sight was very impressive! Even major construction is manual but highly cordinated & 'efficient'. After all this is one way of keeping the unemployment rate under control!

    Between this hard work, the 'poor' workers have a moment to have a laugh!! Isn't that a wonderful sight!

    Related to:
    • Road Trip

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    Roadside snack

    by HarShe Written Nov 26, 2005
    on Mumbai-Pune road

    These type of "shop" are a common sight along major highways in India. Mumbai-Pune road has recently been upgraded and travellers can take a break at one of these stops for a quick snack or drink.

    BUT BEWARE! only buy eatables & drinks which are either properly cooked and sealed. Fresh produce may smell and look yummy, but can cause diarrhoea or other illnesses such as Typhoid, Hepatitis etc.

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    The Local FLEA MARKET

    by Amitu Updated Jun 3, 2005

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    Loooking for cheap cotton casuals?Looking for artificial jewellery? Visit this market.It has anything and everything you can think of - even electronics and cellular phones. Everything is sold on roadside stalls. Although it may be very crowded during evenings, there is plenty of 'room' for bargaining.
    Tip- must carry plenty of water and courage to make way through the congested, narrow streets.

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    Harihareshwar, A quiet seaside village

    by sushart Written Aug 18, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Harihareshwar Beach

    Harihareshwar beach is on the Arabian Sea coast. It is a beautiful beach, where the river Savitri empties herself into the sea.

    The MTDC (Maharshtra Tourism) has recently built beautiful cabin/huts by the beach and also bigger bamboo huts with air conditioning a little away.

    When we went in March, 2003, they were clean, comfortable and very relaxing. The food was great, and the peaceful atmosphere most restful.

    We had driven from Mumbai. The road is good, though the route is quite long and winding, going through the Ghats. Deserted at points with sharp curves, and quite scary... and then you are treated withflashes of beautiful vistas though the Ghats.

    Getting there:
    Nearst airport is Mumbai. 215 kms.

    Nearest railhead is Mangaon, 65 kms.onKonkan Rly.

    Mumbai-Harihareshwar,230 kms. via Panvel-Mangaon-Goregaon Phata on Mumbai-Gao Highway. Shriwardhan-Harihareshwar,20 kms. Bangmandala-Harihareshwar,4 kms.

    Related to:
    • Beaches

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    My Travel Diary

    by SirRichard Updated Dec 22, 2003

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    The route

    In 2001 I made a trip to South India. A lot of new experiences, new friends and lots of wonderful places.

    I have uploaded a Travel Diary in a travelogue. It's in spanish, but I have translated the text in english. So you can enjoy some watercolor drawings and follow my steps day by day.

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    MONKEY SHOWS ON STREETS

    by Amitu Updated Jan 27, 2003

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    One can see a 'MADARI' (hindi name for monkey trainer)' on the sreets, with his monkey performing acrobatic stunts, much to the amusement of the local by-passers who at the end pay a rupee or two for the performance. It has come to my knowledge that,unfortunately some of these 'MADARI's' treat these animals very shabbily.

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