Kanheri Caves, Mumbai

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  • monkey see, monkey do
    monkey see, monkey do
    by smirnofforiginal
  • Kanheri Caves
    by smirnofforiginal
  • Kanheri Caves
    by smirnofforiginal
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    Kanheri Caves

    by ashishashar Written Aug 26, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    These are Buddhist caves or monasteries where monks practiced their austerities around the first century AD. And unlike the artistic extravagance of Elephanta, they are spartan and bare. Situated in the heart of Mumbai's National Park, the complex contains more than a hundred tiny cells cut into the flank of a hill, each fitted with a stone plinth that evidently served as a bed. There is also a congregation hall supported by huge stone pillars that contains the dagoba, a kind of Buddhist shrine. And if you pick your way up the hill you will find channels and cisterns that are remnants of an ancient water system that channeled rainwater into huge urns. In fact, Kanheri is probably the only clue to the rise and fall of Buddhism in Western India.

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    • Religious Travel
    • Architecture

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    Kanheri

    by NedHopkins Updated Feb 16, 2005

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    Cave 3, Kanheri
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    Sculpted out of solid rock nearly 2,000 years ago, during the Buddhist ascendancy in India, the Kanheri caves are both more numerous and more impressive than those on Elephanta Island.

    Those on Elephanta are reached by sea, a 45-60 minute ferry ride. The 90 caves at Kanheri -- actually within the Mumbai/Bombay city limits -- are 60-90 minutes by car or autorickshaw from Colaba.

    (The caves are technically in Sanjay Gandhi National Park. The younger son of Indira Gandhi, and grandson of Pandit Nehru, independent India's first prime minister, Sanjay was being groomed as his mother's successor when he died in an airplane accident. His elder brother, Rajiv, then became the heir apparent and, after his mother's assassination, became prime minister. Later, out of office and running for reelection, Rajiv too was murdered.)

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    • National/State Park
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel

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    Kanheri Caves

    by ni3sgalave Written Nov 30, 2009

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    In the Kanheri caves
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    These are Buddhist caves or monasteries where monks practiced their austerities around the first century AD. And unlike the artistic extravagance of Elephanta, they are spartan and bare. Situated in the heart of Mumbai's National Park, the complex contains more than a hundred tiny cells cut into the flank of a hill, each fitted with a stone plinth that evidently served as a bed. There is also a congregation hall supported by huge stone pillars that contains the dagoba, a kind of Buddhist shrine. And if you pick your way up the hill you will find channels and cisterns that are remnants of an ancient water system that channeled rainwater into huge urns. In fact, Kanheri is probably the only clue to the rise and fall of Buddhism in Western India. In Local Laugauge is called "kanheri Leni"

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    • Family Travel
    • Theme Park Trips
    • National/State Park

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    Kanheri Caves

    by smirnofforiginal Written Apr 27, 2010

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    From the 2nd to the 9th century these caves were used by Buddhists monks as monasteries and temples. If you are in the Sanjay Gandhi National Park they are worth a trip to but they are certainly not worth a conserted effort to see. The Elephanta Caves are more worth while and certainly Kanheri are not a patch on Ellora or Ajanta.
    Having been to all 3 of the aforementioned caves, in 45 degree heat I did not manage to conjure enough stamina to looks around all the caves here. Instead I climbed back down to where there was an entertaining chatter of monkeys and chose to watch them instead!

    From inside the entrance of the Sanjay Gandhi National Park take the bus (it's about 5kms away, a small fee the only way to get there!). The bus ride takes you around the edge of a jungle ravine which is nice. Once at the cave entrance there is a café but nothing else. The buses seem to return on the hour and there is nowhere comfortable or in the shade to wait (as I discovered to my discomfort and boredom!).

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Archeology
    • Jungle and Rain Forest

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