Jaipur Local Customs

  • Amber Elephant & Mahout
    Amber Elephant & Mahout
    by lynnehamman
  • Steep  Climb to Fort at Amber
    Steep Climb to Fort at Amber
    by lynnehamman
  • Jaipur - India
    Jaipur - India
    by solopes

Best Rated Local Customs in Jaipur

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    Elephant Transport at Amber Fort

    by lynnehamman Written Nov 15, 2008

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    Amber Elephant & Mahout
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    The plight of the elephants that have to carry tourists up to Amber Fort disturbs me deeply.
    Elephants are meant to inhabit forests and jungles- not cities.Moreover, they are not meant to trudge miles along burning hot tarmac-covered roads, carrying tourists. I understand the thrill that a tourist may feel, having a ride on an elephants back- but there is a huge difference between carrying up to 4 people up a steep hill (to Amber Fort) in the heat, and taking a tourist for a short walk.
    Elephants that are used for transportation at Amber have to make the 11 km walk from their compound in the old city at Jaipur every morning, carry passengers all day, and then walk back to Jaipur. The heat is intolerable. They suffer from sunburn, and the hot tarmac must be agonising on their feet (often affected by foot disease) Their Mahouts, who also work under difficult circumstances and often have concern about the welfare of the elephants, have to prod them with metal goads. This desparate, painful discipline is needed to keep their charges in order. Elephants need a lot of water every day, and the water supplies are low in summer.
    PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE take this advice if you care for animals- WALK up the hill to the fort, or take a jeep. It will be one less load on a Jaipur Elephant.

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    If you are a smoker, then smoke a BIRI

    by schlumpf Written Jan 28, 2005

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    Walking trough the street of India you will see all the people (i saw only man) smoking such a small sigar, called BIRI. In India there are a lot of tipes of Biri and it is a normality smoke a biri. (it costs also only 5Rs Vs 50/70Rs for a package of cigarettes), they smoke wherever, on trains, buses, restaurants and so on....

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    Ganesha

    by keeweechic Written May 31, 2006

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    Ganesha Statues are also called Rupas. Lord Ganesha is the elephant headed God of Wisdom and Success and is believed to help people with new beginnings. He is one of the most popular Hindu deities throughout India. Ganesha can also be referred to as Ganapati. He is not an Elephant god but was more human shape. His head was severed by is father, Lord Shiva, when his father mistook him for someone else. It was his mother, Sri Parvati, who begged Lord Shiva to replace Ganehs'a head, which Lord Shiva did, only this time with an elephant's head.

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    Puppets

    by keeweechic Written May 26, 2006

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    Puppet plays are performed by skilled puppeteers and are based on popular legends. In Jaipur, the making of the puppets (or kathputlis ) is among the traditional family business as well as being part of the culture. Aside from the puppeteer there is also a helper who plays the dholak or drum and may even sing ballads. You will find puppet sellers at the Fort or City Palace for a very cheap price especially outside of these attractions.

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    Nevrotic queue!

    by schlumpf Written Jan 28, 2005

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    If you would need to caugh a bus, a train or a flight, then you will have the problem of the queue.
    In India, as well as in a lot of places in Asia, there is no respect for queue
    The rule is: the first one speak is the first that has to be listened!
    Altough you are waiting for your turn, you will detect that hundreds of people will jump on your shoulder trying to overtake you...it will take away your hair..something really bad! Be patient, that’s the only thing to do!

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    Climate

    by keeweechic Written May 30, 2006

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    Jaipur sits around 431metres above sea level. The average summer temperatures range from 25.8C to 40.6C, although it can go up to 45C. The average winter temperature ranges from 8.3C to 22C, fairly mild. The best time to visit is between October and March. The heart of the monsoon time is July/August.

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    PHOTO OPPORTUNITY

    by BerniShand Written Dec 30, 2003

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    All of the places we saw were wonderful photo opportunities, here at the Amber Fort is a holy man who is happy for you to take his picture for a fee [ about 20 rupees ]

    it is best to ask before you take photographs of people, a small tip is usually required

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    Elephant Festival

    by keeweechic Written May 26, 2006

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    The elephant festival is held March/April to celebrate Holi and is held the day after Holi. Elephants are beautifully decorated and paraded in a procession along with camels, horses and folk dances. There are also elelphant races, elephant polo matches as well as a tug of war between elephants and men. Usually held at the Chaugan Stadium.

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    Carpet Workshop # 8

    by grets Written Aug 7, 2005

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    Tying knots

    Last, but not least, is the process of tying the ends in to neat and tidy knots.

    Not surprisingly, the process of making one single carpet, from start to finsih, takes several months and involves numerous workers.

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    plentiful pink

    by TomorrowsAngel Written Feb 11, 2005

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    one of the old city entrances

    Jaipur was founded by Sawai Jai Singh II, in 1727 AD. It was possibly the first planned city of India. The pink color was used at the time of building to create an impression of the red sandstone buildings of Mughal cities. In 1876, Jaipur repainted itself pink (no other colour was availbe in such vast quantities) to welcome Prince Albert and Queen Elizabeth II, and thus the name “Pink City” stuck to it

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    Carpet Workshop # 2

    by grets Written Aug 7, 2005

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    David trying out weaving

    While watching the weaving process, we were encouraged to try our hand at the loom - for a remunreation of course.

    Here David is learning the finer details of carpet weaving, and from the look on his face I don't think he is finding it too easy.

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    Carpet Workshop # 3

    by grets Written Aug 7, 2005

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    Burning off excess

    After the carpet is finished, the loose ends or uneven knots are burnt off on the reverse side with a small blow torch. This is very delicate work, as leaving the blow torch too long in one place, could result in a severe burn, or even worse, a hole in the carpet.

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    Carpet Workshop # 5

    by grets Updated Aug 7, 2005

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    Separating strands

    Once the cleaned carpet has dried, another painstaking process takes place: each row of weaving is separated to distinguish between each colour better. What a time consuming and labour intensive preocess!

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    Carpet Workshop # 6

    by grets Written Aug 7, 2005

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    Fluffing it up

    The next person in line - and there are separate people doing each of the various jobs - fluffs up the carpet with a metal brush to ensure the rug is going to be soft and fluffy. You'd think this would be the last stage in the process - but it isn't.

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    Carpet Workshop # 7

    by grets Written Aug 7, 2005

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    Trimming the tufts

    We're getting towards the end of the process, with this young lady demonstrating how each 'inquisitive' tuft on the correct side of the carpet is trimmed to ensure every one is the same length and size.

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Jaipur Local Customs

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