Fun things to do in Jaipur

  • Jantar Mantar
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  • No harem ladies - only local tourists
    No harem ladies - only local tourists
    by Bernd_L
  • Sacred water bassin at the Galta Temple
    Sacred water bassin at the Galta Temple
    by Bernd_L

Most Viewed Things to Do in Jaipur

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    Galta Temple

    by Bernd_L Written Jan 24, 2014

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    Just a few kilometers east of Jaipur in a picturesque valley we visited the Galta Temple. Some people also call it the Monkey Temple because there is a big population of rhesus macaques.

    The complex consists of several temples and sacred water bassins where the hindus take their spiritual baths.

    Sacred water bassin at the Galta Temple Magnificant temple entrance Temple in the Galta Temple complex Inside the Galta Temple Monkeys at the Galta Temple
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    Samode Hotel

    by solopes Updated Dec 19, 2013

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    This was the first time that we lost ourselves inside the hotel, with the feelings of being in a featured monument.

    All the space is absolutely fantastic, and, if it is open only for the guests, it's a good reason to stay at least one night there.

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    Cenotaphs of Royal Gaitor

    by Donna_in_India Updated May 27, 2013

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    You can reach the Cenotaphs of Royal Gaitor using the Zorawar or Samrat gates at the northern city wall. (A cenotaph is a tomb or a monument erected in honor of a person whose remains are elsewhere.) The cenotaphs are made of marble or sandstone. What is particularly interesting about the cenotaphs is that each has a different design and is styled according to the power and majesty of a particular king during his lifetime.

    This was a beautiful, peaceful place that contained the cenotaphs of the maharajas of Jaipur from Jai Singh II (founder of Jaipur) to Man Singh II (last maharaja of Jaipur).

    Open daily from 9 a.m. - 4 p.m.

    Admission is free, but you may be required to pay a small camera fee.

    Cenotaphs of Royal Gaitor Cenotaphs of Royal Gaitor Cenotaphs of Royal Gaitor
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    Rugs show

    by solopes Updated Feb 14, 2013

    I am always the target: anywhere I go,

    Fernanda's incapacity to show indifference makes me the bad guy that, after having dozens of rugs at his feet, ends buying none, because what he said in the beginning of the "performance" was true - after thirty years travelling, I have no more space at home for rugs or carpets (thanks God!).

    Of course, buying in the origin is usually cheaper, and with great choice. But it is also a risk, and, sometimes, a waste of time.

    India is a good place to buy, but... no more for me!

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    MOTI DUNGRI FORT of Gayatri Devi

    by goutammitra Updated Dec 16, 2012

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    The Moti Dungri fort perched atop the Moti Dungri hill is a replica of a Scottish fort. The term Moti Dungri means Hill of Pearls. There is also an ancient Ganesha temple up there which is very famous. There was previously a small fort known as Shankargarh here but later Sawai Man Singh II redesigned it after a Scottish castle. It served as the venue of numerous socialite parties; it was also the residence of Gayatri Devi for a while. The Maharani was the third wife of Maharaja Sawai Man Singh, later became the queen mother or the chief queen.After they were wed Maharaja Sawai Man Singh brought his new bride, Maharani Gayatri Devi, on a tour of the palace. She liked the palace so much that Maharaja gifted it to her. A small temple is also part of the palace complex. During the Emergency declared by Prime Minister Indira Gandhi the Maharani Gayatri Devi was living in Moti Doongri, and was later arrested. She was imprisoned in Tihar Jail for a few months along with the Rajmata Vijaya Raje Scindia of Gwalior. Shrimati Indira Gandhi also called for excavations in the palace thinking that the Maharani may be hiding treasures inside the palace.

    Entry of public is banned for this palace for unknown reason, one can have a close look from Birla Temple!

    FORT MOTI DUNGRI OF MAHARANI GAYATRI DEVI A Close View of the Palace! Me in front of the Palace !
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    Iswari Minar

    by bradbeaman Written Oct 7, 2012

    The Iswari Minar Swarga Sal means "Heaven piercing minaret". The minaret was build by Jai Singh’s son, Iswari in 1749 to commemorate his victory over Madho Singh. This picture was taken from on top of the Krishna Temple across the street.

    Iswari Minar

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    Iswari Minar

    by illumina Updated Sep 23, 2012

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    This seven storied minaret on the western side of Tripolia Bazaar is the highest structure in old Jaipur and was built by Sawai Ishwari Singh in 1749 to commemorate an important victory. For a small fee you can climb the tower to the top for some fabulous views over the city.

    The entrance is around the back of the row of shops along Chandpol Bazaar.

    View from the top!
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    Sunset at Nahargarh Fort, Jaipur

    by vinod-bhojak Updated Jul 29, 2012

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    I went to the Nahargarh Fort and loved the sunset.its also called Tiger fort.It was a palace where royalty used to live and awesome to go there and see the entire city in the night. very attractive. There is mini bar and a small restaurant where you can have dinner.

    Sunset at Nahargarh Fort, Jaipur
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    Hospital & Health Industry

    by goutammitra Updated Jun 1, 2012

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    The city of Jaipur has one of the oldest hospital during it's Raj days Sawai Man Singh Hospital which more than 150 years old. Time to time the King of Jaipur has renovated and re-equipped the hospital. It offers free treatment to the people of Rajasthan. Besides, this the city of Jaipur is also having swanky modern hospital, which offers very good treatment ( They are told to be transplanting Kidney also) and generating revenue for the state and encouraging medical tourism.

    The century old Sawai Mansingh Hospital.

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    Jaipur is not only Touristy but a Major IT Hub

    by goutammitra Written Jun 1, 2012

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    Jaipur is known to the world as a major tourist center of India and part of Golden Triangle that is Delhi , Agra and Jaipur. But very few know that is also emerging as major IT hub of India and world as well. Due to it's peaceful nature and excellent law and order situation ( one of the best in India), the major IT companies are now shifting their bases from Gurgaon and Noida to Jaipur.

    Please look at the massive building being built called World Trade Center, when ready it will house( working) at least 20000 people with at least 50 major IT companies of the world. This place is situated on Delhi Jaipur highway , which makes it very viable for highway industry.

    World Trade Center , picture taken from my hotel. World Trade Center , picture taken from my hotel.
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    Goddess of Joy & Happiness - Harshshat Mata Temple

    by anilpradhanshillong Written Apr 4, 2012

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    Just across the garden in front of the Chand Baori, lies the Harshshat Mata Temple dedicated to the Goddess of joy and happiness. Though in ruins partly, there is enough of it to showcase the expertise of the skilled workers who built this temple sometime in the 9th-10th. century AD. As it is on a raised platform, it has a commanding view of the entire area. An iron railing now protects the campus of the temple.

    You can walk across from the Chand Baori, past a revolving one-person-at-a-time gate. There is a notice board describing the temple. It was built by Raja Chandra of the Chauhan dynasty who ruled over Abhanagri during 8th-9th century AD. Raja Hari Chandra was the founder of this dynasty with the capital city at Mandore near Jodhpur. Earlier, the place was known as Abha Nagri (‘City of Brightness’), the name contracting to Abhaneri.

    The architecture of the temple is marvellous, especially the pillars and the upper niches, and may be considered as one of the best examples of medieval architecture in the area. The central dome is high and decorated with frescoes which have faded over time. However, the carvings along the inside of the central dome, speaks of a high degree of craftsmanship. You can hop on to a nearby railing and click away. The lady ‘pujari’ (priest) will only smile indulgently. Once you finish with your ‘darshan’, you may perform the customary circumambulation, clock-wise.

    First Written: Apr. 5, 2012

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    Moon Step Well - Chand Baori

    by anilpradhanshillong Updated Apr 4, 2012

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    The road to this famous step well is straightforward enough. From Jaipur you get on to the National Highway (NH 11) going to Agra and traverse about 95-odd kms (roughly 90 minutes). From Jaipur to Dausa (56 kms) to Sikandra (28 kms). Then take left turn to Gullar Chauraha (6 kms), then a right turn to Chand Baori (2 kms). There are 3 toll gates along the way. You finally reach a dusty village, Abhaneri, and on your right will be an architectural marvel, a ‘boari’ (step well) that, on first sight, seems so akin to the lithographs of the Dutch artist, M.C. Escher (http://www.mcescher.com/). Next to it is Harshshat Mata Temple.

    Chand Baori is one of the deepest and largest step wells in India. It was built by Raja Chandra of the Chauhan dynasty who ruled over Abhanagri during 8th-9th century AD. Raja Hari Chandra was the founder of this dynasty with the capital city at Mandore near Jodhpur. Earlier, the place was known as Abha Nagri (‘City of Brightness’), the name contracting to Abhaneri. Logically, it is man’s answer to the perennial water shortage in the area. What is astonishing is not man’s quest for water; rather, the high degree of precision and engineering skill displayed by the architect and the other workers in the general design and concept in an age when sophisticated machines and computers were unknown and unheard of. To top it off is the fact that this was not a showpiece but a utilitarian well used by the village folks for their daily needs and before proceeding to the nearby Harshshat Mata Temple.

    The step well is square in shape with a strong wall enclosing the entire structure. It has over 3,500 symmetrically laid out steps on three sides of the structure which drop down 13 levels, to a depth of over 100 feet. There may be more steps below the water level. On the fourth side, the one you encounter the moment you enter the step well, there are pavilions built one on top of the other. These pavilions have carved out places housing beautiful sculptures and religious carvings of Lord Ganesha and Goddess Durga. The pillars holding up the pavilions are tall, slender and intricately carved. Strong railings enclosing the steps and the pavilion prevent you from descending to the pavilion or to the water level. The overall visual effect is that of an upturned pyramid.

    Once you go round and face the pavilion, you will notice recesses and rooms which seem to be hidden from view but which seem to run right round the four sides of the structure. These could have been the rest rooms for weary travellers or for pilgrims visiting the nearby Harshshat Mata Temple. In the absence of any official record, all conjectures are permissible.

    One person at the entrance to the structure did say he was an ‘official guide’ but the tales will be the same – ghosts built the entire structure in one night; if you toss a coin into the well, it is so very deep you will not be able to retrieve it; years ago a wedding party went into the pavilion and lost their way, never to be seen or heard of any more; some more tales of other people on whom the same fate befell. Better to go it alone, admire the structure, marvel at the perfect symmetry, think of the hardy people of yore who toiled so hard to fetch a mere pail of water.

    There is no Entrance Fee to visit this monument though a charge of Rs. 50/- is levied (no official receipt) on all video cameras. A rustic washroom is to the left of the structure.

    First Written: Apr. 5, 2012

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    Son-et-Lumiere - Amer Fort

    by anilpradhanshillong Written Apr 4, 2012

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    Not to be missed is the Son-et-Lumiere at the Amber Fort & Palace complex in the evening. This is a spectacular show as one side of the entire complex is your stage with the narrator (Amitabh Bachchan - Hindi version) and the lights being your characters. The show unfolds the story of the 600 years'-odd Kachhwaha dynasty and the 28 kings. This fort was the seat of power till Maharaja Sawai Jai Singh II moved his capital to the new, planned city of Jaipur in 1727.

    The show is on every evening at 7 pm (English) and 8 pm (Hindi).

    First Written: Apr. 4, 2012

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    Jal Mahal - The Water Palace

    by anilpradhanshillong Updated Apr 4, 2012

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    From the city centre as you proceed to Amber fort, about 4 kms away, you will come across a huge body of water with three large buildings on it, with the Aravalli hills forming a neat backdrop. This is the Man Sagar (Man Lake) and the biggest building of the three is the Jal Mahal (Water Palace). During the day, the scene is quite ordinary but come the evening and the palace is lit up to present an exquisite picture. The shimmering water and the vast expanse of the lake imbues the palace with an alluring beauty. For an even better view, go up towards Amber Fort, park your vehicle before the fork that takes you to Nahargarh Fort and watch the jewel of lights of Jaipur, with the Jal Mahal to your mid-top left corner. It is a sight you will not forget.

    Originally meant for duck-shooting parties by the well-heeled, it had fallen into disrepair. However, a complete makeover of the Palace, as well as of the lake, was undertaken in 2011. Now, there are comfortable boats to take you across to the Palace.

    In 1596 AD, when a severe famine afflicted this region, the-then ruler of Ajmer ordered construction of a dam across the Darbhawati River. In the 17th. century, a stone masonry wall replaced the original structure. The final touches to the Palace and to the Lake were done during the reign of Jai Singh II of Amber in the 18th century. When the lake is full, only the top floor of the Palace remains above the level of the water; the rest four floors get submerged.

    First Written: Apr. 4, 2012

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    Pearl Hill - Moti Dongri

    by anilpradhanshillong Written Apr 4, 2012

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    Located in the Adarsh Nagar part of Jaipur city, about 3 kms from the city centre, is a Scottish castle look-alike perched on top of Moti Dongri or Pearl Hill. It is called by that name as it is supposed to resemble a pearl drop. The castle is the private property of the royal family.

    Once a year during Ganesh Chaturthi, the temple of Lord Ganesh in Moti Dongri, is thrown open to the public. The temple is noted for its excellent marble carvings. At all other times, it remains closed to the public.

    First Written: Apr. 4, 2012

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