Fun things to do in Jaipur

  • Jantar Mantar
    by Willettsworld
  • No harem ladies - only local tourists
    No harem ladies - only local tourists
    by Bernd_L
  • Sacred water bassin at the Galta Temple
    Sacred water bassin at the Galta Temple
    by Bernd_L

Most Viewed Things to Do in Jaipur

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    Heaven Piercing Minaret - Iswari Minar Swarga Sal

    by anilpradhanshillong Written Apr 4, 2012

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    This ‘Heaven Piercing Minaret’ was built by Maharaja Iswari Singh in 1749 to celebrate a victory. Legend has it that he built it to secretly watch the bewitching daughter of his Prime Minister who lived next door. It is located in Tripolia (Triple Gate) Bazar. Had he watch his borders with equal intensity, he may not have committed suicide by taking recourse to poison and making a cobra bite him as the Maratha army advanced upon his kingdom. True to tradition, three of his queens consumed poison while his 21 wives committed ‘jauhar’ on his funeral pyre.

    The way to the top of the tower is not through a series of steps. Rather, like at the Jantar Mantar, there is a continuous circular serrated incline that goes all the way up. Once you're on top, you're a bit dizzy. However, the breathtaking view of the Old City is compensation enough.

    The minar is open from 9 am to 4.30 pm hrs and has a nominal entrance fee.

    First Written: Apr. 4, 2012

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Photography
    • Family Travel

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    Albert Hall

    by anilpradhanshillong Written Apr 4, 2012

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    This Central Museum is an exquisite building, modelled as it is along the lines of the Victoria and Albert Hall in London. The foundation stone for this building was laid on Feb. 6, 1876 by Prince of Wales during his visit to Jaipur. It was thrown open to the public in 1887. There are innumerable sections in the museum, each more delightful than the previous one. The armoury section has all the blood-curdling weapons of war, including a male statue wearing an iron mail dress. One section holds the pottery – blue as well as white while another section boasts of ivory busts and statues. Pride of place is given to the mummy of Tutu from ancient Panopolis, present day Akhmim in Egypt. Another noteworthy exhibit is The Ramayan Shield. Musical instruments are also on display here.

    In a nondescript, dusty room on the ground floor is the magnificent Persian Garden Carpet (Char Bagh), purchased in 1632 AD by Mirza Raja Jai Singh I. Its 28’ 4” by 12’ 4’ size is of a Persian garden replete with designs of ponds, sectioned gardens, water tank and other animals, including a dragon. Taking a photo of it from any angle is impossible – it is laid on the marble floor, sloping framework of glass and wood covers it and it is pushed into a corner of the room. Still, if you walk around the framework you cannot but help admire the intricate workmanship.

    It is open from 9.00 am to 5.30 pm.

    First Written: Apr. 4, 2012

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Museum Visits

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  • Visit Nahargarh Rescue Center

    by nitsagarwal Written May 12, 2011

    This rescue center is pretty good and the you need permission to visit this part of the city. Panthers in their real habitat and a couple of beautiful temples make the place beautiful. The place is more explorable in Monsoons. we usually go there on bikes.

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    Jama Masjid

    by MM212 Updated Apr 15, 2011

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    Recognisable by its slender twin minarets, the Jama Masjid is the "Friday Mosque" of Jaipur. The structure consists of three floors with beautiful polyfoil arches and a hint of Gothic influence in its architecture. The mosque dominates Johari Bazaar street in the old city of Jaipur. Moslems in the city of Jaipur are a sizeable minority, constituting about 10% of the population.

    Polyfoil arches of Jama Masjid - Feb 09 Full view of Jama Masjid Balconies with Gothic-like architecture

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  • Take a cooking class

    by jane.amanda Updated Apr 4, 2011

    When I was planning my trip I wanted to do something different and unusual-not the general sight seeing eat at a local place everyday. Though I did do that twice in a row. The third day I took a cooking class. I have never cooked before (unless you count microwave meals) but in two hours I whipped up some great white meat, indian bread, vegetable dumplings (under supervision).
    I spent half the day with this lady. We went shopping for ingredients in the local market-fresh vegetables, meats etc. Then we chopped and cleaned, we cooked and finally we dug into the meat which was delicious!! All for a very affordable price. Worth it!

    Related to:
    • Food and Dining
    • Women's Travel
    • Eco-Tourism

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    visit to chohki dhani

    by mantru Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    it is a resort however for visitors there is an evening festivities as well you need not stay in the resort to enjoy the evening.....you get the feel of Rajasthan,their food traditions,culture,dance and music...all at the same place.......its interesting i love to go there and just laze around,listen to folk music and fill my stomack with different kind of local bread and butter......few more info....
    Chokhi Dhani is heralded as an ethnic village resort situated 15 kilometers from Jaipur. The entry fees start from Rs. 250, which includes dinner. The village consists of mud huts, temples, wells, small teashops providing hot fries and sweets. An old musician plays a short tune to welcome each guest. You can enjoy folk dances, magic shows, puppet shows and many other things here.

    chauki dhani

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    Bazaars

    by MalenaN Updated Dec 22, 2010

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    Take some time and wander around in the bazaars in Old Town. Small shops line the streets and often you find that neighbouring shops specialise in the same craft. You will find almost everything here: carpets, printed textiles, saris, jewellery, leather footwear, iron work, kitchen utensils, marble and stoneware and much more. Even if you don’t want to buy anything it is nice to see what’s on sale and to watch all the people.
    Most shops in the bazaar are open between 10.30 - 19.30 on Mondays - Saturdays.

    In the Old City

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    Iswari Minar Swarga Sal

    by MalenaN Written Dec 22, 2010

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    You can climb Iswari Minar Swarga Sal to get a great view over Jaipur and the old town. The entrance to the minaret is from a small street behind Chandpol Bazaar, near Tripolia Gate. The man selling tickets asked for Rs 20, but I pointed out that it only said Rs 10 on the ticket (August 2010). That was the price so that was what I was paying. He didn’t have change to a 50-rupee bill but would get that while I was climbing the minaret. He told me to put the ticket in my bag while visiting the minaret and I think he wanted me to forget about my change when I came back down. I didn’t forget, but the man had “forgotten” and had to be reminded.
    There is a spiral passway with no steps leading up to the top of the minaret. Along the way are several pigeons and lots of pigeon poo.

    The minaret, which is also called Heaven Piercing Minaret, was built by Iswari, the son of Jai Singh. Iswari committed suicide when Maratha troops where advancing, and at his funeral his 21 wives and concubines committed jauhar, a traditional ritual where the wives died on their husbands pyre.

    Iswari Minar Swarga Sal is open between 9.00 - 16.30.

    View from Iswari Minar Swarga Sal
    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel

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    Havelis of Old Jaipur

    by MM212 Updated Nov 5, 2010

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    So prosperous was the city of Jaipur in the 18th and 19th centuries that many of its rich inhabitants were able to afford themselves sumptuous palaces. Known as havelis, these palaces were typically built along the Rajput and Mughal styles with chhatris (domed pavilion balconies), spacious arcaded courtyards and delicate lattice windows. As the city became impoverished over the years, most of these luxurious palaces fell into decay as well. While many were later renovated and turned into hotels or found other uses, a large number within the old city of Jaipur continue to be inhabited by descendants of the original owners. Walking around the city, it is hard not to admire these beautiful old palaces. During my walks around the old city, I was not shy and walked through the open doors of these old palaces to take a few photos... perhaps I was trespassing but no one seemed to object. Attached are a few examples of these havelis.

    Peeking inside a haveli Havelis seen from Hawa Mahal Inside another haveli domes and arches of a haveli Fa��ade of a haveli in Jaipur
    Related to:
    • Architecture

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    The Pink City

    by MM212 Updated Oct 19, 2010

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    The different shades of pink, red ochre and peach colour that cover nearly all of the buildings of Jaipur have earned it the nickname, the Pink City (and makes it similar to Marrakech in Morocco). The tradition of painting in this colour - the colour of hospitality in local culture - goes back to the important visit by the Prince of Wales, future King Edward VII, in 1876. Before his arrival, the ruler of Jaipur, Maharaja Ram Singh, had the entire city painted pink to extend a warm welcome to the Prince. Thereafter, the inhabitants of Jaipur have mostly continued this tradition, not only within the Old City walls, but also in the modern city. Attached are photos of Jaipur's pink architecture.

    The Pink City Different shades of pink

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    Garh Ganesh temple

    by MM212 Updated Oct 9, 2010

    Perched on a hill above Jaipur is this peculiar castle-like temple. It is appropriately named the Garh Ganesh Temple, which translates to "Fort of Ganesh," and is dedicated to the Hindu god Ganesh. It is recognisable by the large red Hindu swastika on its façade. Visits to the temple are possible, but it is reached via a series of steps along a fortified wall that snakes up the mountain from Gaitor, north of the city, where the Maharaja cenotaphs are located. If you feel like taking the hike, great views will await you up top.

    Zooming in on Garh Ganesh temple - Feb 2009 Temple seen from Jaipur (top right of photo)

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    Royal Gaitor

    by MM212 Updated Oct 8, 2010

    Located just north of Jaipur, in the shadow of the hill crowned by Nahargarh Fort, Royal Gaitor is the cemetery of the Maharajas of Jaipur. It was chosen as the cremation site for the male members of Jaipur's royal family in 1733, soon after their capital was moved from Amber to Jaipur. The site contains numerous royal cenotaphs in the form of magnificent onion-domed pavilions (chhatris), enclosed within a walled complex and built using intricately carved stone or white marble depicting Hindu mythological scenes and floral motifs. If such mausoleums seem almost Moslem in style and architecture, it is no accident for this tradition was directly borrowed by Rajput Hindus from the Sultans and Mughal emperors of India. An important difference, though, is that these cenotaphs contain no corpses, for Hindus cremate their dead. The most famous chhatri in Royal Gaitor is that of Sawai Jai Singh II, built by his son, Ishwari Singh, after his death. The cenotaphs and site are very well kept and are rarely visited by tourists.

    For more photos of these beautiful cenotaphs, check out my travelogue: "Royal Gaitor."

    Royal Gaitor - Feb 09 Entrance of Royal Gaitor - Feb 09 The domes of Royal Gaitor Sawai Jai Singh II One of the magnificent mausoleums
    Related to:
    • Architecture

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    Maharani ki Chhatri

    by MM212 Updated Oct 7, 2010

    Like the Maharajas of Jaipur, the Maharanis (wives of the Maharajas), have their own cremation ground, known as Maharani ki Chhatri. It is very similar to Royal Gaitor, with numerous cenotaphs built as domed pavilions using intricately carved stone and white marble, all within a walled enclosure with a garden. Although slightly less well kept than Gaitor, this site is still a pleasant place to admire the beautiful Rajput architecture and its Mughal influences without the tourists. Maharani ki Chhatri is located on Amber Road, just outside the northern walls of the old city.

    For more photos, check out the travelogue: "Maharani ki Chhatri"

    A pavilion in Maharani ki Chhatri - Feb 09 Mausoleums of Maharani ki Chhatri

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    Bazaars of Jaipur

    by MM212 Written Oct 2, 2010

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    When Maharaja Sawai Jai Sing II commissioned the construction of his new capital, Jaipur, in the 18th century, he immediately encouraged merchants and artisans to settle in the city to promote it as a commercial centre, a tradition that continues to this day. Jai Singh II's planned city and its wide boulevards were divided into bazaars, each of which often specialising in a random type of merchandise. Examples include Johari Bazaar (jewellery), Bapu Bazaar (leathers and fabrics), and Tripolia Bazaar (kitchenware and utensils). The area is very walkable, but beware, shop sellers can be aggressive in trying to lure customers in. Attached are a few photos of Jaipur's bazaars.

    Tripolia Bazaar Nehru Bazaar Johari Bazaar

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    Moti Dungri Palace

    by MM212 Updated Oct 1, 2010

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    Occupying an entire hill on J Nehru Road, Moti Dungri Palace is an 18th century fortified castle that dramatically overlooks the modern section of Jaipur. It was initially intended as a defensive castle called Shankargarh, and later also served as a prison, but in the early 20th century it was converted into a royal palace by Sawai Man Singh II. It was renamed Moti Dungri Palace after the hill it occupies, Moti Dungri, which means "Hill of Pearls". The castle is still owned by the former royal family and is unfortunately closed to the public. Immediately below it is the striking white marble Hindu temple, the Birla Lakshmi Narayan Mandir.

    Moti Dungri - Feb 09 Moti Dungri seen from Rambagh Palace Close up Seen from Nahargarh fort
    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

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