Jaisalmer Things to Do

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Most Recent Things to Do in Jaisalmer

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    Tilon ki Pol

    by al2401 Written Dec 14, 2013

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    Tilon ki Pol
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    The Tilon ki Pol is the name given to an archway over the road to Gadisar Lake. It is made from yellow sandstone and has been beautifully carved. It is named after a royal courtesan - Tilon - who built the gate.

    As usual there are a few stories about the gate. This is my favourite.

    The king was not happy about the gate as he thought it beneath him to go through the arch so Tilon built a temple to Krishna on the top of the arch to save it from being destroyed.

    You can climb some stairs on the side of the gate for a great view of the lake.

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    Gadisar Lake

    by al2401 Updated Dec 14, 2013

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    Gadisar Lake
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    This is a man-made rain water catchment built in the 1400's to improve on a natural depression that retained water. The lake is surrounded by temples, shrines and ghats. There are many catfish in the lake and there always will be someone trying to sell you bread to feed them.

    Gadisar Lake is located on the southern outskirts of Jaisalmer and the entrance to the lake is through a magnificent cavred yellow sandstone archway known as the Tilon Ki Pol. It was built by a royal courtesan in the end of the 19th century. On the street down to the arch you will find local musicians and market stalls.

    Boat rides are available on the lake.

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    Rooftop viewing

    by al2401 Written Dec 14, 2013

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    Jaisalmer Fort
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    Nearly all restaurants and hotels have rooftop dining. What is the drawcard? - apart from the fesh breeze? There are some incredible views of the city and the fort to be had from these places.

    Be prepared to climb some narrow steep staircases - the view is worth the effort!

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    Nathmalji ki Haveli

    by al2401 Written Dec 14, 2013

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    Nathmalji ki Haveli
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    This haveli was built in two parts by brothers Hathi and Lulu. It was designed to serve as the residence of Diwan Mohata Nathmal, the then Prime Minister of Jaisalmer. Because the two halves were built at different rates there are some irregularities in the finished building. Nonetheless it is considered the most elegant and grand in Jaisalmer.

    The design is a mix of Rajput and Islam. The outer facade is exceptionally exquisite and the colour and design of the interior is just beautiful - especially the ceilings.

    it is open from 10am th 5pm for the oast of 50 rupee. (20 rupee for Indian nationals)

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  • al2401's Profile Photo

    View the fort at night

    by al2401 Written Dec 14, 2013

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    The Jaisalmer Fort is in the centre of the city. You can see it from almost any place. Rooftop restaurants of the roofs of hotels provide the best viewpoint for the fort at night time. It is beautifully floodlit so photography is not too difficult. My pictures were taken from the rooftop restaurant of the Narayan Niwas Palace Hotel.

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    Jaisalmer Fort at sunset

    by al2401 Updated Dec 11, 2013

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    Sunset on Jaisalmer Fort
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    The colour of the fort at sunset is what gives Jaisalmer the name of 'Golden City'. One of the best places to view the changing colours as the sun sets is the Bada Bagh about 8 kiometres from the city centre. As the sun sets the fort takes on a rich golden colour which changes to a purple shade just before the sun disappears completely.

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    The Havelis of Jaisalmer

    by al2401 Written Dec 9, 2013

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    Patwon Ki Haveli - Jaislamer
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    The history of Jaisalmer is built upon trade with both the east and west. Rich merchants built mansions called havelis built from the local yellow sandstone. They are identified by the ornate carving and the style of architecture mirroring the Ottoman and Islam style. They are often characterized by wall paintings, frescoes, balconies and archways.

    The three most famous haveli in Jaisalmer are Patwon Ki Haveli, Salim Singh Ki Haveli, and Nathmal-Ki Haveli. Theywere constructed in the 19th century.

    The havelis are open to visitors from morning until 5pm.

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    Jain Temples

    by al2401 Written Dec 8, 2013

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    Jain Temples - Jaisalmer
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    Jainism is one of the oldest religions in India. It was once the state religion of Indian kingdoms but has now been replaced by Hinduism and Islam. The religion has contributed in a major way to Indian architecture and art.

    The Jain temples in the Jaisalmer fort are wonderful examples of this. They can be seen towering above the rest of the buildings in the fort. The temples date back to the 12th and 15th century and are built in the Dilwara style. they are dedicated to Jain Tirthankars.

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    Jaisalmer Fort

    by al2401 Updated Dec 8, 2013

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    Main Gate - Jaisalmer Fort
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    Jaisalmer Fort located on the top of Trikuta Hill is one of the largest forts in the world. It was built in 1156 AD by the Bhati Rajput ruler Rao Jaisal. If you take 'mer' as meaning hill/fort then you have the name of Jaisal's Fort.

    It is made from yellow sandstone - the colour changes from a tan colour to golden yellow in the evening sun giving the fort the name of Golden Fort. The fort is in the centre of the city but the best place to view it in the evening is from Bada Bagh.

    The fort is still a place of residence for almost 4,000 people and is very busy especially in the narrow lanes past the shops and markets. Restricted for large vehicles, motorbikes and tuk-tuks
    abound.

    Must sees in the fort are the Royal Palaces, the Jain temples, the rich Turkish style Havelis and the shopping area.

    The fort is under threat from seepage and the massive walls are constantly being repaired. Concern is felt over the increasing population of the fort and the also increasing tourist numbers putting extra strain on the walls.

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    Ghost town of Kuldhara

    by al2401 Written Dec 8, 2013

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    Kuldhara ghost town - Jaisalmer
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    Situated about 18 kilometres west of Jaisalmer are the remains of the town of Kuldhara. Its origins are unclear and there is also uncertainty on the cause of the loss of its residents.

    It is thought that in the 13th century people of a small but rich kingdom in the Thar Desert moved to the area around Kuldhara to escape the rule of a bad king. There were some 84 villages in the area, of which Kuldhara was the largest, and it was a rich community. In the 18th century the area was deserted. This is thought to be as a result of raids which killed their livestock causing the wells to be contaminated by the remains.

    Another and more romantic story goes something like this.

    An evil ruler wanted to marry the daughter of the village chief. He threatened to take her by force and destroy the village so the chiefs all got together and decided to follow the path of honour and every person in the 84 villages left one night. They left a curse behind them for anyone who wished to inhabit the villages.

    Maybe this is why so many of the buildings are still so much intact rather than being destroyed for building materials. Local paranormal societies believe there is are spritis who wander at night and that no-one is able to spend the night there.

    Or maybe it was the contamination of the water supply. I'll leave that up to you to decide.

    The site certainly has some well preserved buildings and it is easy to see the layout of the town with wide, even, criss-crossing streets. Decorations of the houses indicate a prosperous town.

    The story of the re-discovery of Kuldhara is also fascinating. It involves two greedy tourists and a local man who refused to keep their secret of the gold and silver they had dug up. Read about it here.

    http://www.indianexpress.com/news/a-forgotten-city/638864/5

    I enjoyed my visit to this 'open air museum'. There was a ticket collector at the entrance but as it was part of a tour I have no idea about the price.

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    Bada Bagh

    by al2401 Written Dec 8, 2013

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    Bada Bagh - Jaisalmer
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    Bada Bagh is located 6km north of Jaisalmer on top of a hill. It is the site of royal cenotaphs or chhatris of the maharajas of Jaislamer. The original chhatri is believed to be that of Jai Singh II who reigned from 1470 - 1506. The last chhatri is from the 20th century and was meant for Jawahar Singh but remains unfinished. The name means Big Garden.

    The garden is somewhat neglected but is interesting to visit. It is most popular on sunset as it provides an impressive view of the Jaisalmer Fort which turns a rich golden colour in the setting sun.

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    PHOTOGRAPH THE WOMEN

    by davidjo Written Mar 30, 2012

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    COLOURFUL WOMEN
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    This is an ideal place to take photos of the local women with their traditional costumes, jewellery, tattoos, and colourful saris. Just stroll around using your zoom lens or approach them to request permission, nobody ever refused me!

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    SONAR QUILA, THE FORT

    by davidjo Written Mar 30, 2012

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    amazing architecture

    The fort is also known as Sonar Quila due to the yellow colour of the stone and is an imposing structure as you approach the town from the desert. You can spend hours wandering around inside the fort admiring the wonderful architecture of the numerous buildings. Don't miss visiting the Royal Palace, Huge Gateways, the Jain temples and the Havelis (houses of the rich merchants). The Havelis were built hundreds of years ago and usually the descendants of the families who originally built then are in residence. They have several floors with beautiful carvings, many rooms, balconies and Archways. The fort was originally built in the middle of the 12th century by Rawal Jaisal.

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    Shopping frenzy

    by SophieDumouchel Written Feb 28, 2012

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    Front window
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    Jewel Caravan is a lovely "museum-boutique" with an incredible choice of jewellery.
    There is a vast selection of Rajasthani silver ornaments, as well as a precious collection of Tibetan jewellery in silver, turquoise, lapis and coral. They have also gemstones, both rough and facetted. Furthermore, that shop offers a good variety of Kashmiri textiles, shawls, silk scarves, embroidered kurtas, wool rugs and adorable bags. If you prefer more peculiar items, they have a selection of statues, prayer wheels, singing bowls and thangkas. For the spiritual ones, you can even find crystal healing wands...
    The owner is professional, helpful and very patient. He will most likely invite you for tea and provide you with a nice conversation. Absolutely no harrassement or "under pressure sale".
    Finally, if you want to learn more about the items and Indian arts and crafts, there are many brochures available to give you details about the products offered.
    Enjoy your visit!

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  • Camel Safari

    by mariache Written Feb 17, 2012

    For those who are looking for the proper company to make safari with.. I would highly not recommend Adventure travel agency! Their safari is the most expensive compare to, for example, Sahara or Ganesh, but it definitely don't worth that big difference! Don't be confused by German office woman Martina, who is attractive, friendly, talkative and seems trustful. Your experience will totally depend on camelmen... We were told by Martina that there will be nobody in the desert, but always saw people, mostly local indians, their villages (that might be good if you are interested though). We were expecting being in true nature, but were almost always going by pathes or even car roads, seeing bikes and rikshaws sometimes, other campfires nearby. On our breaks for breakfast, lunch and dinner there were always somebody else from the nearest villages, having food with us (that we don't mind), or taking bags of rice and vegetables from our provision to their homes (which we don't mind as well, cause there were too much food for us, but why we should pay for such an enormous amount that we definitely don't need?). That was all still ok, but on the last morning there were no eggs and fruits left, because they were given to villagemen by camelmen!! Camelmen told different stories about who took our eggs and fruits - dog (!:-D), village boy, "you already finished them", "we forgot them in village, sorry, sorry", etc., but that was just clear what happened... We paid more than enough not to have only porrige and toasts for breakfast! And the camelmen themselves were not pleasant at all, it was visible that when they are trying to be helpful, mostly they are doing this for tips. Once I asked about extra pillow or blanket for seddle, and camelman told that he arranged that but I saw that it was just the same... They were not interested in us as in persons, they were not asking questions about our countries, homes, etc., they were interested only in money. Moreover, they were even lying about their lives when we asked questions... Not pleasant guys at all, unfortunately(( The only thing that probably worth to pay for is rather warm and comfortable bed (their famous bed-roll), but it can make difference, if any, only in winter time; when the weather is warm, don't even think about paying that much money! Hope you'll get amazing, merry and happy experience with another company and good camelmen!!)

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Jaisalmer Things to Do

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