Jodhpur Local Customs

  • Hand impressions of women who've committed Sati
    Hand impressions of women who've...
    by vinod-bhojak
  • Hand impressions of women who've committed Sati
    Hand impressions of women who've...
    by vinod-bhojak
  • Hand impressions of women who've committed Sati
    Hand impressions of women who've...
    by vinod-bhojak

Most Recent Local Customs in Jodhpur

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    Sati pratha(practice)

    by vinod-bhojak Written Feb 4, 2015

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    Loha Pol, which is the final gate into the main part of the Meharangarh fort complex. Immediately to the left are the handprints (sati marks) of the ranis who i immolated themselves on the funeral pyre of their husband.
    What is Sati--Sati is described as a Hindu custom in India in which the widow was burnt to ashes on her dead husband's funeral pyre. Basically the custom of Sati was believed to be a voluntary Hindu act in which the woman voluntary decides to end her life with her husband after his death. But there were many incidences in which the women were forced to commit Sati, sometimes even dragged against her wish to the lighted pyre.
    This practice was banned in the 19th Century, but still apparently happens in the remote rural areas of Rajasthan.In 1987 village called Diwrala near Jaipur a well educated 17 year old name woman became Sati named Roop Kanwar, who was a resident of the village and whose husband, Mal Singh Shekhawat, had died of disease the previous day. While many details remain unclear, many[who?] claim that she took the decision to follow the ancient custom and died on the funeral pyre of her husband, while the general feeling is that she was forced by the villagers on to the pyre,
    After she had burnt to death, the place was converted into a memorial and thousands of people from surrounding regions started visiting it, though afterwards the area was sealed in order not to promote sati as a legitimate action, and to prevent similar incidents happening in the future.

    Hand impressions of women who've committed Sati Hand impressions of women who've committed Sati Hand impressions of women who've committed Sati Hand impressions of women who've committed Sati Hand impressions of women who've committed Sati
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    Courtsey Dilect

    by umashanker Updated Apr 12, 2007

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    Language spoken here is Jodhpuri and it is a local dilect of Hindi.This dilect is consider very sweet ,although it is difficult for even north Indians to percive all content.This language is very respectfull as every sentence is ended by word SA or SHA .SA means Saheb or Sir.Even if a local will mention of stray dog , he will say with due respect to a dog,For example,"Kuta sha(Dog sir).They always,"Ha sha(yes Sir) Na sha(No Sir)".Evan if a Jodpuri fellow abuse in anger that too with respect,one example," Mhari juti thare sir pe virajegi Sha(My shoes will be honred on your head sir)".

    This dilect is unique in this aspect.Now due to urbanaisation and touristry it is changing but still people are good there.
    There are 33 dilects of Hindi language among them braj Bhasha and Jodhpuri are considered most sweet dilects.

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    Hindu Gods

    by tremendopunto Written Sep 22, 2006

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    There are supposed to be more than 300.000 gods according to Hindu belief. Wherever you go you will find temples, shrines and god statues or symbols on every corner. There is a god for every need - and my personal favourite is Ganesha - the god of good luck and wealth. This statue of Ghanesha can be seen at the foot of the mighty Meherangarh Fort.

    Ganesha and me

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    Indian Hospitability

    by tremendopunto Written Aug 31, 2006

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    The people of India are one of the friendliest and most hospitable people Ive ever met. And they love to celebrate. When we returned from Meherangarh Fort we passed another celebration and without knowing what was really going on we were asked to come in!

    It is a pitty I only have this pic, showing me being nicely greeted by those kids.

    surrounded by the cutest kids

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    The Blue City

    by keeweechic Written May 13, 2006

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    The city is situated on the southern fringe of the Thar Desert. Known as the Blue City due to a great deal of the homes and buildings in the old town being painted in a shade of indigo blue. The blue intensifies as the days bright rays fade. Blue was the colour of the Brahim (member of a priestly section of Hindu society) houses but today even non-Brahim houses are painted blue.

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    Marwar Festival

    by keeweechic Updated May 13, 2006

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    In October there is an annual festival of dance and music. This festival celebrates the classical ‘Maand’ style of folk music - music centred on the romantic lifestyle of Rajasthan's rulers. The festival is held over 2 days during the full moon of Sharad Purnima. Other attractions of the festival include horse riding and horse polo.

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    Arts & Crafts of Jodhpur

    by keeweechic Updated May 13, 2006

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    Jodhpur in earlier days became the epi-centre of western Rajasthan as far as enamelling of jewellery is concerned. Silver and gold ornaments were enamelled for the neck called timniya. The city is known for specialised cottage industries which sell glass bangles, cutlery, carpets, and marble products. A unique craft of Jodhpur is also the painting of camel hide skins with gold to make small containers for asha (a blended liqueur which is a popular beverage in Jodhur). Asha is made up of distilled rose or saffron which is embellished with crushed pearls and ground gold with chunks of goat and sheep brains. IT was conceived and prepared by the great Moghuls.

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    Climate

    by keeweechic Written May 13, 2006

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    The best time to visit Jodhpur is November and March. They city has a typical desert climate, hot and dry. Monsoon time is around July and August. The maximum temperature during summer is around 40ºC. Winter’s minimum ranges an average temperature of around 11ºC.

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    Must enjoy dance and music

    by umashanker Written Jun 4, 2005

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    Music and dance is a way of life here.Almost all people love music here.The street singer carry local musical instrument and mostly acompnay a child dancer.You find them at all sight seeings ;in Mehrangarh fort, Jaswant Thada,Mandore or even in streets.They require a small tip and you can enjoy the best of local tribe music and folk songs.The famous dance is here Goomer and Kalbelia dance.Kalbelia dance is very exciting one and thrill is difficult describe here.Must see it.

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    Sati Handprints

    by Canadienne Written Feb 13, 2005

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    Just inside the entrance gate to Mehrangarh Fort, you'll come across this relief of handprints on the wall, with flowers strung across and scattered below.

    Numerous royal satis, or self-immolations, took place in Jodhpur. Sati is the now-outlawed custom of sacrificing one's life at the funeral pyre of the husband. This decoration honours the memory of those lives. . .

    Sati Handprints
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    • Women's Travel

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    Traditional Clothing

    by Canadienne Written Feb 12, 2005

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    We spent several hours at the home of the Bishnois family we visited. . .it was time spent chatting, looking around their farm, playing with the children, and eventually being dressed by their daughter. Ava, an Australian woman who was on the day-trip with us, and I were both kitted up in traditional outfits ~ an especially enjoyable experience for me, as I adore Indian fabrics and clothing.

    Traditional Styles

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    Bishnois

    by Canadienne Updated Feb 12, 2005

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    The Bishnois are a religious sect and a rural tribal group ~ they follow the teaching of Jambeshwar, a 15th-century sage who left a legacy of 29 (bis noi) tenets. They are vegetarian and keenly protective of the environment and animals in their surrounding area.

    They live on isolated farms, not in communities, in order to protect themselves from competition and rivalry with their fellow Bishnois. So, if you're going to try to visit, it's best to have a local guide to help you find a family homestead.

    Seeing themselves on

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    Pottery - A Local Craft

    by Canadienne Updated Feb 12, 2005

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    The surrounding villages include dhurrie-weavers, leather craftsmen and potters.

    We had a chance to spend some time at one potter's wheel, watching in amazement as he shaped the local clay into vases, jugs and even animals!

    Potter at work

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    Village Cooking

    by Canadienne Written Feb 12, 2005

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    Our trip into the countryside was arranged with Upendra Srimali, the manager of the Haveli Guesthouse. We had one other woman with us on the day-trip and Upendra was our guide and interpreter. I've had both good an bad experience with this type of "village visit" and I found Upendra's tour to be informative, fascinating and sensitive to the locals. . .that last one is particularly hard to ensure.

    We had lunch at the home of a farmer ~ the daughter-in-law did the majority of the meal preparation, while the father tried to keep the two young kids out of the way. The food was basic ~ dal, chapati with raw sugar, vegetables and rice ~ but tasty.

    Preparing chapati

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    Marwar Craft Villages

    by Canadienne Written Feb 12, 2005

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    The countryside around Jodhpur is home to many Bishnois familes and several different craft villages as well. We spent some time at a co-operative for dhurrie weavers. Their work is highly regarded in the area.

    Roopraj, who is on the left in this photo, was the spokesman of the operation. He had a fabulous three-ring binder filled with articles clipped from magazines and newspaper (German Elle, Home Decor, etc.) which featured his co-op. Whenever his name appeared, it was highlighted in yellow and he took tremendous pride in showing us the operation of the co-op and the interlock process.

    Traditional interlock weaving

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