Jodhpur Off The Beaten Path

  • Bishnoi Potter
    Bishnoi Potter
    by lynnehamman
  • Dhurrie weavers
    Dhurrie weavers
    by lynnehamman
  • Cenotaps
    Cenotaps
    by RAJASTHANBYCAR

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Jodhpur

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    Bishnoi Beliefs

    by lynnehamman Updated Nov 3, 2011

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    A village dog had killed a chinkara fawn's mother. So the Bishnoi family had adopted him before he became prey to other predators in wild and a mother nursed him as if it was her own child...
    The Bishnoi people hold all forms of life very sacred, and deers are held in highest esteem.
    The Chinkara is of the Deer family.
    The Bishnoi do not cremate their dead like Hindus. The reason being that they believe it is wrong to chop down a tree for the wood needed for a cremation.

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    The Bishnoi -crafts,culture and beliefs

    by lynnehamman Updated Apr 8, 2009

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    Bishnoi Potter
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    A fascinating day trip out of Jodhpur is a visit to the Bishnoi villages, in the countryside south of Jodhpur.
    The villages scattered around have houses built from mud and thatch, all with veg gardens, and wild animals roaming around (particuarly black-buck).
    The Bishnoi are craftspeople, and their skill at pottery and weaving can be observed first hand. They also observe strict principles regarding everyday life.
    The Bishnoi are followers of a 15th century sage called Jambeshwar, whose 29 principles (bis noi) are based upon total protection of all forms of life, and the enviroment.They are strict in their beliefs, and believe that their re-birth will be in the form of a Deer. So strong is their belief in preservation that unlike most Hindu communities, Bishnois bury their dead instead of cremating them. This is because of the strict prohibition on the felling of trees, the wood of which is required for cremation.
    They have herds of goats, and camels, and tend them with great care.The weavers use camel hair in the weaving process, and beautiful dhurries (rugs) are woven after the materials are dyed with vegatable colouring.
    Men wear predominantly white, but Bishnoi women dress in vivid colours, and much ornamental silver jewellery. The nose rings are striking.
    Villages we stopped at were:

    Gudda Bishnoi
    Mogra
    Salawas (famous for weaving)
    Kakuni (for pottery)
    Rohet ( good lunch stop at hotel)

    Kakuni is the southernmost village, and is 26km south of Jodhpur.
    Travel agencies in Jodhpur can arrange a 4wheel drive taxi, and 6-8 hours allowed for the trip.

    There are numerous refreshment stops (dhabas) along the way, and at Rohet there is a good hotel for lunch.

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    Mandore Garden

    by RAJASTHANBYCAR Updated Feb 14, 2009

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    Cenotaps
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    Mandore is located about 10 Kms north of Jodhpur. It was the former capital of Maharajas of Marwar.The ruined fort and palace of yester years are still intact on the hilltop.Its extensive Mandore garden, with high rock terrace, makes it a popular local attraction. In the Mandore garden, there are the dewals or cenotaphs of Jodhpur's former rulers. Instead of the usual chhatri-shaped cenotaphs typical of Rajasthan, the cenotaphs of the famous Mandore garden of Jodhpur, Rajasthan are built along the lines of a Hindu temple. They are four stories high, with fine columns and an elegant spire, all in red sandstone. The most impressive dewal is the dewal of Maharaja Ajit Singh. These cenotaphs are set in beautiful landscaped gardens.Mandore is considered an oasis in the desert with its enticing laid out gardens. Mandore a visual treat because of the vast expanses of greenery of Peepal, Banyan, Palms and Plantains along with cascading fountains and lovely peacocks and monkeys.Now the garden has been converted into a park for children.

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    The Hall of Heroes in Mandore

    by RAJASTHANBYCAR Updated Feb 13, 2009

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    Paubji
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    A temple really, it houses larger than life statues of Hindu gods and goddesses as well as of famous Rathore martyrs like Pabuji who died in the defense of a herd of cows in the fourteenth century.Mandore also has a much revered shrine for the three hundred and thirty three million Hindu gods and goddesses.

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    Marwar Festival

    by 10753435 Written Jun 18, 2008
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    The most popular Jodhpur festival is the Jodhpur Marwar Festival. It is held every year in memory of the heroes of Rajasthan. Marwar Festival of Jodhpur, Rajasthan was originally known as the Maand Festival. The festival is held in the month of Ashwin. Ashwin is a Hindu month between September-October. The Marwar festival in Jodhpur, India is celebrated during the full moon of Sharad Poornima. It goes on for two days.

    The main attraction of this festival is the folk music centered on the romantic lifestyle of Rajasthan's rulers. The music and dance of the Marwar region is the main theme of this festival. The folk dancers and singers assemble at the festival and provide lively entertainment. These folk artists give others a peek into the days of yore, of battles and of the heroes who still live on through their songs.

    Among other attractions at the festival, is the camel tattoo show and polo. The venue of this festival includes the famous Umaid Bhawan Palace, Mandore and Mehrangarh Fort.

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    Jaswant Thada

    by 10753435 Written Jun 18, 2008
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    Jaswant Thada lies to the left of the Mehrangarh fort complex. It is a royal cenotaph made up of white marble. It was built to commemorate Maharaja Jaswant Singh. Some rare portraits of the former rulers of Jodhpur are also displayed here.

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    Musical Serenade

    by atufft Updated May 8, 2007

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    After dinner, Belinda and I were the sole audience for a group of outstanding musicians. They sung and played there rather unique variety of Rajasthani music, which I had yet to find recorded anywhere but by our video, until I tracked down the You Tube link below. The Rohet Garh website shows the musicians and their instruments, but basically the trio consisted of organ/accordian type instrument called a harmonium, a drum, and som slap sticks. The music is very percussive, and the singing very soulful and a wonderful accounlike any other Indian music that I had heard. The performance was dedicated to us and we were the solo members of the audience. This stands out as among of the best musical performances I've ever experience--really! Sorry no still pictures. This was a night performance with hardly any light.

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    • Arts and Culture
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    Village Safari

    by Carino Written Apr 22, 2007

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    We had fun playing with this kids
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    In Govind Hotel we booked a Village Safari for 600 Rp per pax. We were supposed to see various small villages and get a touch of the local flavour. Well, let's put it that way.... you do see some handcrafts, also known as shops. Then you are brought to a small village, where a lot of local citizen will approach you. But the only thing they want is, that you take their picture and then ask for money. The last village was the highlight. You get the chance to play with children and have a real local lunch. Very unique experience.

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    Marriage Ceremony in Rohet

    by atufft Written Apr 9, 2007

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    When we were in Rohet, we were invited to a wedding that took place as night. First, we walked over to meet the bride and see how she was dressed. She and her sisters and girlfriends were busy eating and preparing for the ceremony. After that, we walked over to the groom's home, where the men were celebrating in wild ways that would be familiar to anyone from the USA and Europe. Finally, the bride and groom were brought together for the marriage vows. We met the bride and groom and by the help of a child who knew some English, we were able to have a few questions answered. Music and festivities continued for so many hours that we eventually chose to go back to our room and sleep.

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    Farmer's Water Supply

    by atufft Written Apr 9, 2007

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    Rohet Water Supply

    The water supply for drinking, cooking, and washing came from a lake, which I believe was a reservoir of sorts that could also provide some irrigation. Women came to the water's edge with jars on their heads.

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    • Farm Stay

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    Opium Ceremony

    by atufft Written Apr 9, 2007

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    School Teacher Explains Opium Ceremony
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    During our visit to outside Rohet, I participated in an opium ceremony. Belinda was afraid to do so for fear the drug might harm her, but it hadn't been since the early 1970's since I had tried the substance, a fact I don't usually share with my friends. The procedure was fully explained by the school teacher, while children sat around and watched. Apparently, the men consume low grade opium as a matter of tradition to make the burden of farm work more bearable I suppose. One of the men was in his late seventies and had been taking opium since he was a young man. I didn't feel any effects of the drug if I was given any at all, which was something of a disappointment, but the ritualized ceremony was fascinating.

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    Farm Life Outside Rohet

    by atufft Written Apr 9, 2007

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    Farmer's Home Outside Rohet
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    The villagers in this region live pretty much as they have for perhaps thousands of years. We visited homes, and when Belinda began to enter the kitchen, she was admonished to take off her shoes. The strange thing was that the kitchen floor was simply cleanly swept earth. We watched new construction of brick, and examined the store of grain used by the family. After I saw workers using wooden pitchforks, I was determined to buy one before the end of our trip. Today, the simple farmer's tool reminds me of the traditional village farming of Rohet.

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    Wildlife Outside Rohet

    by atufft Written Apr 9, 2007

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    Close-up of Bucks Jousting
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    The desert scrub is a mixture of domesticated animals foraging for whatever they can find, and a variety of deer doing the same. Hindu practices do not allow herdsman to eliminate the deer in favor of their farm crops or ranging goats and cattle. We had the opportunity to visit the countryside with a school teacher who had offered his services. On the way to a village, we were amused by jousting bucks in a field.

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    Rohet Henna Tattoo

    by atufft Updated Apr 9, 2007

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    Henna Tatoo Ceremony
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    Rohet consists of a majarah's palace, known as Rohetgarh, a small surrounding village, and surrounding countryside of various family farms and open landscape. In the morning after breakfast, we walked outside Rohetgarh's walls and mingled with the villagers. Soon a young woman offered to paint a henna pattern on my wife's hand, which she accepted, and soon many from the street stopped to watch. Henna is a woman's craft, something done on important occasions, such as before marriage, and so I watched for awhile and then walked down the street to find craftspersons at work.

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    Open for Business

    by keeweechic Updated May 16, 2006

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    On either side of the lane we walked, little shops were open for business but most owners were just relaxing and eyeing the intrusion into this little part of the world which still seemed to be existing on guidelines written decades ago.

    Location : Nimaj - 110kms east of Jodhpur

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