Jodhpur Things to Do

  • Entry gate of Sadar Market
    Entry gate of Sadar Market
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  • colourful Market
    colourful Market
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  • A bangles seller
    A bangles seller
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Most Recent Things to Do in Jodhpur

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    Clock tower of Jodpur

    by vinod-bhojak Written Feb 19, 2014

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    Clock tower of Jodpur
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    The imposing Clock Tower in Sadar market was built by Maharaja Sardar Singh (1880-1911) from whom the market takes it name. In fact, the tower dominates the entire scenario. The sights and sounds of the market must be experienced, even if you don’t intend to buy anything as it is a stupendous cornucopia of a mix of the human species, a spectacle where you can casually look around and see what generally transpires in a busy and noisy Indian market in a city on the run. Locals hawk virtually everything like bangles, imitation jewellery, fruit & veg, spices, pottery, baskets, clothes, etc You can find most of hotels and guest houses also near by clock tower

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    Sardar Market, Girdikot

    by vinod-bhojak Written Feb 19, 2014

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    Entry gate of Sadar Market
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    This is one of oldest markets of Jodhpur. It is noisy, dirty yet colourful and may well have close to 7,000 match-box sized shops. Be prepared to muscle your way through the narrow lanes, with others brushing past you as this market is a shopper’s delight. The exquisite bangles and beautiful scarves, lovely handmade bags and Jooties (slip on shoes with a pointed front) are a visual delight. Bargaining is expected, but don’t try to hammer down prices as a lot of manual work goes into the making of these intricate items and objects. Remember that the tourist season in Jodhpur is just four months, and shopkeepers do depend on tourists for their living. If you look up, you will see a frightening number of electricity and phone lines in a tangled skein. This is a common sight in ALL Indian markets and nothing to worry about. Forget about them.
    Narrow alleys suddenly dart into exotic bazaars selling anything from textiles, antiques, silverware to handicrafts. Each bye-lane has its own specialty. Bangles are very popular. The main entrance to Sardar Market is from the opposite side, coming up Nai Sadak, through a gate which named Girdikot (crowded gate). Nai Sadak has always been lined with sari and shoe shops. The range of items seen in this bazaar varies from its specialty, tie & dye textiles and hand embroidered leather shoes, to lacquerware, genuine and ‘just-made’ antiques, carpets and rugs, quilts and blankets in winter, puppets dressed in typical Rajasthani styles to exquisite Rajasthani textiles, filigreed miniature beasts of burden, marble inlay work and old-age silver jewellery. It is a vivid example of 19th century town planning gone awry. The planners didn’t expect India to cross all limits in birth rate and population!

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    Mehrangarh Fort - Audio Tour

    by al2401 Written Feb 2, 2014

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    Mehrangarh Fort - Jodhpur

    This tour takes you back in time as you wander through galleries full of rich history.

    It is in various languages including Hindi, English, French and German and is well worthwhile. The commentary is excellent and informative and there are also tales and reminiscences from the Royal Family.

    As well as the audio equipment the tour includes a map and you can start or leave it at any stage.

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    Mehrangarh Fort

    by al2401 Updated Feb 2, 2014

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    Scale model - Mehrangarh Fort
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    The Mehrangarh Fort is one of the largest in India and sits some 400 feet high above the city of Jodhpur.

    During his rule Rao Jodha (1438-1488) decided to move his capital from Mandore for the sake of security. A new fort was built on a rocky hill about 9 kilometres to the south and the city of Jodhpur grew up around it. This hill was known as Bhaurcheeria, the mountain of birds, and legend states that a hermit known as Cheeris Nathji or Lord of the Birds was removed to build the fort. As he left he cursed the fort to always suffer a shortage of water. To this day the region suffers drought every 3 - 4 years.

    Although work on the fort was begun by Rao Jodha in 1459 the majority still standing was built during the reign of Jaswant Singh (1638-1678). The bronze model shows the massive walls and fortifications surrounding the various palaces.

    The forts of Rajasthan each have a special feature. For me the feature of the Mehrangarh Fort is the wonderful museum rooms and the fact that photography is welcome. The best way to visit this fort is to hire an audio unit and wander about at will.

    The fort is open daily from 9am - 5pm.

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    Mehrangarh Fort - Period Rooms

    by al2401 Updated Feb 2, 2014

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    Mehrangarh Fort - Phool Mahal
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    The Mehrangarh Fort has some of the most luxurious royal apartments in India. Built over many years they include many styles including Rajput and Mughal.

    The most magnificent of the rooms is the Phool Mahal or Palace of Flowers featuring a ceiling of rich gold filigree. The room was the work of Maharaja Abhaya Singh (1724-1749) and the gold was a prize of war with the Mughal governor, Sarbuland Khan. The paintings were added at a later stage by Jaswant Singh II. It is believed to have been a private pleasure chamber where girls danced for the Raja.

    The Moti Mahal or Pearl Palace is the largest of the fort's period rooms. It is located within the Zenana (ladies section) and was most likely used as a private audience hall for those very close to the ruler. There are hidden balconies from which the queens could observe the proceedings. It was built by Raja Sur Singh (1595-1619) and features pearlescent white plaster walls and brilliant coloured glass panels. The ceiling is covered with gold leaf and mirrors.

    Takhat Vilas was built for the use of Maharaja Takhat Singh (1843-1873) who was the last ruler to live in the fort. The room shows a variety of styles from traditional to modern - the glass balls suspended from the ceiling suggest the modern age of the British rule. The floor is painted to look like a carpet.

    Another modern room is the Sheesh Mahal or Hall of Mirrors. It is a good example of the Rajput style using larger squares of mirror rather than the mosaics of smaller pieces of the Mughal style. While most Mughal Sheesh Mahals were believed to be pleasure chambers it is thought that the Mehrangarh Sheesh Mahal was a private temple.

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    Mehrangarh Fort - Museum

    by al2401 Written Feb 2, 2014

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    Mahadol - Palanquin, Mehrangarh Fort - Jodhpur
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    The museum at the Mehrangarh Fort has one of the most comprehensive collections in India and in most cases photography is permitted.

    There are displays showcasing nearly every facet of life in historic Jodhpur including -

    Elephant's howdahs and Palanquins - howdahs were designed to be strapped to the back of the elephant with the king sitting higher in the front and his bodyguard/servant in the rear. A palanquin is carried by bearers and was the favoured form of transport for the royal women.

    Armoury - here is a magnificent display of swords and armour from all through historic Jodhpur. Some of the sword hilts are works of art in precious metals and gems.

    Paintings - there is a fine selection of traditional Marwar art.

    Lifestyle - this gallery holds pieces that reflect the general life style from Shisha (water) Pipes, carved ivory cosmetic boxes and carpet weights.

    Baby cradles - these beautiful cradles show that nothing was thought too grand for a royal infant.

    There also displays of turbans and musical instruments

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    Sardar Markets

    by al2401 Updated Jan 22, 2014

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    Sardar Markets - Jodhpur
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    The Main shopping street of Jodhpur is Nai Sadak. If you follow this street towards the clock tower and through the Girdikot (crowded) Gate you will enter into the Sardar Market - named after Maharaja Sardar Singh (1880-1911).

    The market sells everything you can imagine an Indian householder would want. It is busy, loud and can be a bit 'on the nose'. Here you will find the 'local people's shops' and a reduced pressure to buy. You can get anything from handicrafts, clothes and accessories, to spices, fruits and vegetables. Some bargaining is expected but don't try to beat the price down too much as much of the stock is hand made.

    If you don't like crowds maybe it is not for you but it was great to wander around the inside market. The tourist shops are on the outside and in the square around the clock tower.

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    Gulab Sagar

    by al2401 Written Dec 18, 2013

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    Gulab Sagar
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    Gulab Sagar is a man made lake in the old city area adjacent to Sardar Markets. It was constructed on the site of the original water source called "Bawr' and took 8 years to build. It was built in 1788 by Gulab Rai who was the mistress of Maharaja Vijay Singh. Water flows into Gulab Sagar from another lake - Bal Samand Lake - by means of a canal.

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    The Clock Tower

    by al2401 Written Dec 17, 2013

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    Jodhpur Clock Tower
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    The old Clock Tower is in the older part of town. It was built by Maharaja Sardar Singh (1880-1911) and is right next to the markets of the same name. The tower stands in an open square and can be seen for quite a distance. It stands out when viewed from the Mehrangarh Fort. The clock is still working.

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    Mehrangarh Fort

    by Liatris1 Updated Sep 3, 2011

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    Mehrangarh Fort and Jodhpur, the Blue city
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    The Fort looks really impressive from town, placed as it is on a 122 m hill, and with really highand thick walls. From Jaswant Thada you'll get even more imposing views with the city, fort and the surroundings.

    From the Fort walls you'll get stunning views of the "blue city" and scenery. I really recommend to take a walk inside the Fort and palace. It was an amazing experience to walk through the different rooms in the palace, with beautiful, intricate carvings. And learning about the Maharaja and family who lived there in 1500 and 1700-century... Picturing them there on the balcony, on the throne, lying on the cushions...

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    Mandore Gardens,Chattris & Cenotaphs

    by lynnehamman Updated Apr 8, 2009

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    Mandore, which is situated about 10kms from Jodhpur, is a great place to visit if you are in Jodhpur. This place was originally the capital of the Rathore royalty and kings of Marwar. In the 15th century, Rao Jodha built a new city, Jodhpur, for reasons of safety. The mighty Mehrangarh Fort with its immense fortifications , was built as the new stronghold.
    The remnants of the old capital have been very well preserved, and are set in well kept gardens.
    The gardens are set on terraces, on a hillside, filled with bougainvilla and shady trees.Red sand-stone chattris are scattered on the hillside-they are built in Hindu fashion, with a slightly different style to normal chattris.
    The most impressive chattri is that of Ajit Singh-It is Rajput architecture at its finest. It has a tall spire which towers above the other chattris.
    The history of Ajit Singh is quite interesting. After his death in 1724, his 6 wives and 60 concubines commited sati (which was practiced at the time in Rajasthan).
    Higher up on the hill are cenotaphs dedicated to various queens.
    Mandore can be reached by Taxi or Auto-rickshaw. The driver will wait.

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    Takhat vilas Palace

    by RAJASTHANBYCAR Updated Feb 13, 2009

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    Paintings
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    This beautiful room was the private sanctuary of Maharaja Takhat Singh he rould in1843 to 1873.It was during Takhat Singh’s reign that the British came to dominate India.This bedroom, which was also used dancing to entertain.On hot breezeless nights an attendant, the ubiquitous ‘Punkah-Wallah’ pulled the hand-drawn fan above the bed.The Christmas balls hanging from the wooden rafters are a wonderfully fitting variation to traditionally mirrored Indian ceilings.Unrelated images cover every inch of the walls. Paintings of European women mingle with traditional love stories, of Dhola and Maru,Krishna Lila and dancing girls, Hindu Gods and Goddesses… Even the floor is painted.

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    Jaswant Thada

    by lynnehamman Written Jan 28, 2009

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    Jaswant Thada

    Jaswant Thada, located half way up the long road that climbs onwards to the fort, is the traditional cremation ground of the rulers of Jodhpur. Taking pride of place amongst the ornamental gardens and chattris is the fabulous white marble memorial to Jaswant Singh II, built in 1899. The cenotaphs of other rulers , in the same neighborhood , are relatively simpler.

    Inside the main hall are royal portraits and other possessions.

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    Umaid Garden & Zoo

    by abi_maha Written Jan 9, 2009

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    Entry to the zoo 7 aviary
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    One of the popular gardens of Jodhpur is the Jodhpur Umed garden. It is spread on an area of 82 acres. The famous Umed garden of Jodhpur, Rajasthan was developed by Maharaja Umed Singh. It is named after him only. The garden has five separate gates around it to facilitate entry to the garden from different directions. It has lush green lawns with beautiful roses and other seasoned flowers. Also inside the garden, is a museum, towering Ashoka trees, artistically designed fountains, a library and a zoo.

    A 'Walk-in Aviary' in the zoo was constructed in the garden in 1978. The aviary houses different types of birds, local, African and Australian parrots, ducks, rabbits etc. All the birds and animals are kept in their natural environment. However this is very poorly maintained!

    Also in the Umed garden, is a large cage for bears opposite the aviary. Also there are pigeons, crocodiles, foxes, deer, lions, leopards, etc. Children as well as adults very often visit the garden with equal interest. The garden is known for mesmerize people with the nature's beauty in which it abounds. Also, it is a good place to educate children in relation to nature.

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    Umaid Bhavan Palace

    by abi_maha Updated Jan 9, 2009

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    At the palace
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    A quaint palace that is easily visible from most places in Jodhpur. Interesting piece of trivia shared by the auto driver who took us there was that this palace was built by the then King Umaid by hiring brahmins in the times of famine by paying them with 2 square meals a day only!! It was built in the 20th century only and is built of sandstone. The Cupola rises to a 105 feet!! There is a museum inside that is quite interesting
    A vintage car collection- mostly American makes- is also on display here. Only a portion of the palace is open to the public for an entry fee of Rs 15 pp. (for Indians)
    Don't expect to have much to eat here, better to visit the same between meals.

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