Jodhpur Things to Do

  • View from Mehrangarh fort.
    View from Mehrangarh fort.
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  • Things to Do
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  • Fresco at the entrance of Jaipol.
    Fresco at the entrance of Jaipol.
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Most Recent Things to Do in Jodhpur

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    Jaswant Thada

    by lynnehamman Written Jan 28, 2009

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    Jaswant Thada

    Jaswant Thada, located half way up the long road that climbs onwards to the fort, is the traditional cremation ground of the rulers of Jodhpur. Taking pride of place amongst the ornamental gardens and chattris is the fabulous white marble memorial to Jaswant Singh II, built in 1899. The cenotaphs of other rulers , in the same neighborhood , are relatively simpler.

    Inside the main hall are royal portraits and other possessions.

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    Umaid Garden & Zoo

    by abi_maha Written Jan 9, 2009

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    Entry to the zoo 7 aviary
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    One of the popular gardens of Jodhpur is the Jodhpur Umed garden. It is spread on an area of 82 acres. The famous Umed garden of Jodhpur, Rajasthan was developed by Maharaja Umed Singh. It is named after him only. The garden has five separate gates around it to facilitate entry to the garden from different directions. It has lush green lawns with beautiful roses and other seasoned flowers. Also inside the garden, is a museum, towering Ashoka trees, artistically designed fountains, a library and a zoo.

    A 'Walk-in Aviary' in the zoo was constructed in the garden in 1978. The aviary houses different types of birds, local, African and Australian parrots, ducks, rabbits etc. All the birds and animals are kept in their natural environment. However this is very poorly maintained!

    Also in the Umed garden, is a large cage for bears opposite the aviary. Also there are pigeons, crocodiles, foxes, deer, lions, leopards, etc. Children as well as adults very often visit the garden with equal interest. The garden is known for mesmerize people with the nature's beauty in which it abounds. Also, it is a good place to educate children in relation to nature.

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    Umaid Bhavan Palace

    by abi_maha Updated Jan 9, 2009

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    At the palace
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    A quaint palace that is easily visible from most places in Jodhpur. Interesting piece of trivia shared by the auto driver who took us there was that this palace was built by the then King Umaid by hiring brahmins in the times of famine by paying them with 2 square meals a day only!! It was built in the 20th century only and is built of sandstone. The Cupola rises to a 105 feet!! There is a museum inside that is quite interesting
    A vintage car collection- mostly American makes- is also on display here. Only a portion of the palace is open to the public for an entry fee of Rs 15 pp. (for Indians)
    Don't expect to have much to eat here, better to visit the same between meals.

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    Mahamandir Vidhyalay

    by abi_maha Written Dec 29, 2008

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    Serene marvel
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    This temple is now also a place of education. Hardly popular it is a structure that is beautiful and yet uncrowded! Must see in our opinion for the peace and the birds! We sighted parrots by the hoards! :) Dont miss the yoga asanas on the walls of the temple!

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    Mandore- Litter galore!

    by abi_maha Written Dec 29, 2008

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    Beautiful structures within
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    A visit to the mandore gardens may well have been worth braving the sun and heat if not for the fact that the garden is horribly littered and ill maintained! The cenotaphs are beautiful and it really is such a crime for them to exist in such a pathetic condition! More plastic than grass in this garden really!

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    A day out at Mehrangarh

    by abi_maha Written Dec 29, 2008

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    View of the fort from our hotel :)
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    We spent the entire afternoon at the Mehrangarh fort, this is the best plce to visit in Jodhpur, the intricate carvings of the chambers in the fort were awesome!
    There is so much to see and absorb in this fort that time is never enough! Couple of nice cafes and restaurants within where you can have a good meal and some delicious lassi! Cheers! :)
    A chamber full of armoury, another showcasing the palanquins of the queens of Jodhpur, a picturesque temple and a terrace full of canons- all in all an enthralling experience.
    We waitied on the terrace for the sun to set before walking down to the Clock tower for some shopping and AJ feasted on some omelette :)

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    All around the Clocktower

    by satchmo1963 Updated Dec 21, 2008

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    Clocktower
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    The best way to absorb the essence of Jodhpur is to indulge in a relaxed walk-around in the proximity of Clocktower. It gave me a true feel of the riot of colours, noises, commodities, the air and warmth that Jodhpur brings to the table. I suggest you commence your walk from one end of the straight Nai Sadak (near Janta Sweets) with the Clocktower ahead, and finish somewhere around the tower; a one km stretch all included. An amazing array of spices, leather goods, woolies, sarees, trinkets, fresh vegetables and what-have-you's uplift your spirits.

    You may knock off your tiredness after the walk with a double helping of Mishrilal's malai lassi under the clocktower.

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    Meandering at Mandore

    by satchmo1963 Updated Dec 21, 2008

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    Sitting on a park bench, eyeing little girls.....
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    Mandore was the capital of the Marwars before Jodhpur was established.

    What remains at Mandore today is a large, ill-kept garden, within which one can observe some decrepit, run-down temples and cenotaphs, but having amazing architecture.

    After you make your way in, you will encounter a large gang of black-faced monkeys. They couldn't care less about your existence, unless you decide to step on their tails!

    One can gather that the Jodhpur locals largely utilise Mandore Gardens as a picnic spot. I observed such a school bunch littering the place, in between their game of makeshift cricket.

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    A sense of history at Mehrangarh Fort

    by satchmo1963 Updated Dec 21, 2008

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    Cannons stand guard over ramparts of Mehrangarh
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    A detailed tour of Mehrangarh Fort is the high point of one's Jodhpur visit. Built on a hill at a height of 125 metres, Mehrangarh is majestic and formidable. It is witness to the saga of centuries of successful defence of its citadel, and consolidation of Rathore rule. Seven imposing gates (you will find cannon marks on some these to bear testimony to the attacks that the fort survived) surround the fort. The sheer drop from the fort provides a magnificent panoramic view of entire Jodhpur. You may even hear the sounds from the city drift to your ears.
    For those who are weak-legged, an elevator takes you directly to the highest point of the fort (charge : INR 15), from where you may work your way down. The pass for the elevator ride mentions "Elevator at User's Risk"!! Don't get psyched by that message; it's the usual disclaimer that governmental bodies apply to everything under the sun. The contraption in question is quite new, and well maintained.

    I recommend you opt for the audio tour (charge : INR 150), which would give you a true sense of history, and the importance of each place / item in the fort. Superb samples of howdah (which royalty used to ride on elephants), palkis (palanquins), intricate architectural work on rocks and castles, armoury, artwork and dresses form part of the overall experience. But none beats the sheer grandeur, size and atmosphere of the Fort.
    Inside the fort are also some quaint shops, offering samples of local handicraft wares. Whether you purchase some or not, stop by to admire `dhurrie' work that's woven in front of your eyes at one of the outlets there.

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    Sati Shrine

    by lynnehamman Written Dec 13, 2008

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    HANDPRINTS- SATI SHRINE

    Just near Loha Pol gate, on entry, is a monument set into the wall, which displays handprints,covered in gold leaf. According to legend, when their husband, the ruler Maharajah Man Singh died in 1843, all his wives emolliated themselves on his funeral pyre. These are their hand-prints. This practice, called SATI , was banned in the 19th Century, but still apparently happens in the remote rural areas of Rajasthan.
    Even today, women pray at this Sati shrine , believing that it strengthen and enrich their lives.

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    Meherangarh Fort

    by lynnehamman Updated Dec 13, 2008

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    Mehrangarh Fort at Night
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    This magnificent fort- standing on a 125m high hilltop in the centre of Jodhpur, is one of the largest in Rajasthan. The walls are 36 metres high, and 21 metreswide.
    The ruler Rao Jodha laid the foundations in the mid 15th Century, but it was fortified and expanded in 17th century by Jaswant Singh, ruler at that time.The Fort has seven huge entry gates, and the main gate entering the Fort is called Loha Pol.
    Inside the Fort are numerous Palaces containing magnificent sandstone carvings,lattice-work, mosaic & goldleaf, and opulent chambers.
    The Fort Museum houses displays of Rajput weaponry, Howdahs, Jewellery, and antiques of every kind that were used over the centuries.

    I recommend that you use the Audio Guide, which you can get at the entrance to the Fort. It explains, in many languages, what you are seeing.

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    MUSEUM- MEHERANGARH FORT

    by lynnehamman Updated Dec 13, 2008

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    BABY CRADLE
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    Elephant's Howdahs
    The howdahs were wooden seats covered with gold and silver cloth, which were fastened on to the elephant back. The front compartments had more leg space and raised protective metal sheet was meant for kings or royalty and rear smaller ones for a bodyguard .

    Palanquins
    Palanquins were used by ladies of the nobility until 1920's. They were also used by royal men on occasions of importance

    Armour
    A rare collection of Armour from every period in Jodhpur. On display are sword hilts in jade, silver, rhino horn, ivory, shields studded with rubies, emeralds and pearls, guns with gold and silver work on barrels. The gallery also has on display personal swords of many an emperor, among them are outstanding historical piece like the Khanda of Rao Jodha, weighing over 7 pounds, the sword of Akbar the Great and The sword of Timurlane.

    Paintings
    This Gallery displays colours of Marwar-Jodhpur, the finest example of Marwar paintings.

    Baby Cradles
    A collection of baby cradles & rockers can be seen. Handpainted and embellished with birds & flowers.

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    Umaid Bhawan Palace & Museum

    by satchmo1963 Written Dec 8, 2008

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    Umaid Bhawan Palace
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    A grand piece of architecture in marble and pink stone, Umaid Bhawan is perhaps the latest of the grand Rajput palaces to be constructed. Construction commenced in 1929 as a fallout of a famine relief employment generation programme of Maharaja Umaid Singh. The palace was opened in 1945, just 2 years prior to India's independence.
    Majority of the palace is out of bounds for the general tourist. Umaid Bhawan may be segmented into three parts. In one, the royal family of Jodhpur maintains their residence. The second portion is run as a luxury hotel, whilst the third part houses an interesting museum that's open to the general public.
    The well-maintained museum, with friendly accompanying palace guards, contain worthwhile exhibits. I found the sections on clocks / watches and the armoury of special interest.

    Outside the museum, one can admire some well-maintained vintage cars that are part of the royal stable.

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    Jaswant Thada

    by satchmo1963 Written Dec 7, 2008
    Jaswant Thada
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    Less than half a km from Mehrangarh Fort lies Jaswant Thada. This is the final resting place of Maharaja Jaswant Singh II, as also of a few others from the royal family. Built in 1899, this structure contains some amazing lattice work on marble, and also offers great views of the fort and other suroundings. A peaceful place, to say the least.......

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    Visit the Markets

    by lynnehamman Written Nov 4, 2008

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    Market
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    The markets around the Clock Tower come alive at night. There are stalls and small shops selling everything imaginable. Colorful turbans, Bangles, textiles, Jooties (shoes) and Rajasthani crafts. The Sabzi Market (veg market) is colourful, and the spice market has hundreds of types of spices for sale. We never bought any edibles, but I did pick up some glass bangles, which I managed to get home to Australia, without breaking them.
    A stroll around this area at night is really fun and entertaining. The locals love to chat.

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Jodhpur Things to Do

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