Udaipur Off The Beaten Path

  • Off The Beaten Path
    by pfsmalo
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by pfsmalo
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by pfsmalo

Best Rated Off The Beaten Path in Udaipur

  • lynnehamman's Profile Photo

    Jaisamand Lake & Sanctuary

    by lynnehamman Written Dec 13, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Jaisamand Lake
    is located 52km south east of Udaipur and was built by Maharaja Jai Singh in 1685.It is one of the largest lakes in Asia
    On the banks of lake are elegant marble steps descending to the water and a small temple dedicated to Shiva.

    The forests around Jaisamand, which once were the hunting grounds of maharanas of Mewar, have now been converted into a game sanctuary.

    The Jaisamand Sanctuary built in 1957 covering an area of 62sqkm welcomes a wide variety of resident and migratory birds and animals.

    Island Attractions

    There are seven islands on this lake and the Bhil Minas (tribe of Rajasthan) inhabits all. Two bigger islands are known as Babaka Bhagra and a smaller is called Piari.

    Shiva Temple

    On the dam are six exotic cenotaphs and a Shiva temple in the centre. The northern end of the lake has a palace with a courtyard while its southern end has a pavilion of 12 pillars. The hills to its south have grand palaces that have an excellent view of the lake.

    Jaisamand Sanctuary

    This sanctuary built in 1957 lies just beside the Jaisamand Lake and has an area of 62sq km. The lake has a wide variety of resident and migratory birds and is also home to crocodiles. The surrounding forest has leopard, cheetal (spotted deer), chinkara (Indian Gazelle) and wild boar. Tourist bungalows, a forest rest house and a hotel provide accommodation. The best time to visit the sanctuary is between November and June.

    Eagle Jaisamand Lake
    Related to:
    • Photography
    • National/State Park
    • Eco-Tourism

    Was this review helpful?

  • atufft's Profile Photo

    Ranakpur Overview and Architectural Exterior Views

    by atufft Written Apr 7, 2007

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Built sometime between the 14th and 15th century, the Jain temple represents one of the finest buildings devoted to religious purpose anywhere in the world. There are 1400 columns holding up several domes and a multiple of stories, each column uniquely chiseled marble. The lay out is generally around a central patio area, but visitors will have a hard time determining just what the orlginal floor plan was intended to be. The images here complement the general view found on my introduction to Udaipur, and I have for you a multiple of tips that include more images...

    General View from the Road Exterior Corner of Ranakpur Roofline Detail of Ranakpur Exterior Foundation Wall of Ranakpur General View of Ranakpur
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • atufft's Profile Photo

    The Art of Column Detail at Ranakpur

    by atufft Updated Apr 7, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I couldn't photograph all 1400 columns, but I wish I had had the time to do so. Each is so uniquely interesting, and would certainly occupy the interest of the Jain faithful for a lifetime. Symbolism is everywhere. The Chaturmukh Jain Temple of Rishabhadev or The Ranakpur Jain Temple, was reportedly constructed beginning in 1446, and took fifty years to complete. The building has some 40,000 square feet, and three floors. It is indeed a labyrinth of columns. There are several shrines nearby from which the main building can also be viewed through a frame of column detail.

    Central Column at Ranakpur One of 1400 Columns at Ranakpur Columns Surround a Courtyard at Ranakpur Central Courtyard and Colonnade View of Main Building from Shrine of Columns
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Religious Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Luchonda's Profile Photo

    Saheliyon ki Bari

    by Luchonda Updated Aug 16, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Gardens of the Maids of Honor - beautiful gardens were laid out in the 18th century for a retinue of 48 young ladies - sent to Udaipur as part of a princess dowry.The garden has unique lotus pools - marble pavillions and marble elephant shaped fountains !

    Garden of maids

    Was this review helpful?

  • atufft's Profile Photo

    Ruins of Nagda Temple in Landscape

    by atufft Updated Apr 28, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Located 23km from Udaipur, Nagda was the ancient capital of Mewar. Earlier known as Nagahrida or Nagadraha, this town was found by Nagaditya of Guhilot in the 6th century AD. Nagda was the ancient capital of Mewar, and the rulers of Mewar had ruled from Nagda for seven generations until the time of Bappa Rawal (728AD). Nagada was plundered by Muslim raiders under Altamash between 1222 and 1229 AD. Today, the town is in ruins and only partially restored for visitors. There are Vishnu, Shiva and Jain temples with wonderful architectural details. Sas-Bahu Temple, them most extensive temple complex was built in the tenth century. What struck me at first was the variety of landscapes images the ruins could offer. Later, I explored the exterior details and searched for interiors of interest.

    Sas Bahu Temple at Nagda Sas Bahu Temple Complex at Nagda Unrestored Ruins at Nagda Remaining Columns Standing at Nagda Lonely Unrestored Temple in Lake Nagda
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • inuit's Profile Photo

    The temple in Nathdwara

    by inuit Written Sep 6, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    48 Km from Udaipur is the city of Nathdwara. A center of the Krishna followers from Gujarat. The temple has a black image of Krishna and many pilgrims arrive there. A very happy and nice athmosphere out side the temple. I took the photo of a young nice woman out side the temple.

    Was this review helpful?

  • travelmad478's Profile Photo

    Ranakpur Jain Temples

    by travelmad478 Written Mar 10, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If you have time, definitely fit in a day trip to the Jain temple complex at Ranakpur, about two hours by car from Udaipur. The trip alone is very interesting and picturesque, and the temples themselves are absolutely spectacular. See the travelogue for more photos.

    Chaturmurkha Jain Temple
    Related to:
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • travelmad478's Profile Photo

    Kumbalgarh Fort

    by travelmad478 Written Mar 10, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Another excellent day trip (this can easily be combined with a visit to Ranakpur) is the Kumbalgarh Fort, about 85 km north of Udaipur. This fort is actually a huge area surrounded by a wall similar to the Great Wall of China. Inside the enclosure are a deserted palace, dozens of temples that date as far back as the second century AD, and an entire farming village. You can take anywhere from two hours to half a day to wander around this place. For more photos, please see the travelogue.

    Was this review helpful?

  • atufft's Profile Photo

    Eklingi Temple Near the Lake

    by atufft Updated Apr 28, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Built in 734 AD, Eklingi is the beautifully sculpted temple complex with 108 temples within its high walls. The temples are dedicated to Lord Shiva, the presiding deity of Mewar rulers. The walled complex encloses and elaborately pillared hall or ‘mandap’ under a large pyramidal roof and has four-faced image of Lord Shiva in black marble. The wonderful access that the temple has to the lake provides a place for ghats, or baths, used by the local villagers to clean their laundry and themselves. The surrounding dry hills of the Aravalli Range provide and lovely contrast reminiscent of my home in California.

    View of Lake Eklingi and Portion of Temple Entrance to Temple at Eklingi Another Overview of the Temple at Eklingi The Black Krishna at Eklingi The Ghats at Eklingi
    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • atufft's Profile Photo

    Decorated Dome and Details at Ranakpur

    by atufft Updated May 4, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    In the central part of the main building, the three floors and upper dome can be seen. On the exterior, the window details are a constant wonder of detailed workmanship. In a side alcove, the tirthankers are symbolized in statue form for the appreciation of believers. There is also several other sacred artwork of considerable detail, and of course there's always another incredible column to appreciate as art. Outside, monkey agressively solicit food donations from tourists. Unaware of their speed, Belinda lost her sandwich to a monkey that surprised and snatched her lunch.

    Central Dome of Ranakpur Tirthanker Alcove Ranakpur Dome Details Ranakpur Column Capitol Art Ranakpur Dome and Capitol Art
    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • atufft's Profile Photo

    Art and Statue Details at Ranakpur

    by atufft Updated Apr 7, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    There are a wide number of statues of elephants and Tirthankers, the prophets of the Jain religion. Each is a worthy piece of art in its own respect. Some appear to express details of the history of the Jain religion or it's ceremonial calendar. During our visit there, we noticed a practice of celebrating the holidays of certain deities by decorating the image relief with foil or flowers.

    Decorated Diety at Ranakpur Decorated Diety at Ranakpur Elephant Statue at Ranakpur Jain Calendar? at Ranakpur Sacred Jain Art at Ranakpur
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Religious Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • atufft's Profile Photo

    Local Family Portraits Near Nagda Lake

    by atufft Updated Apr 29, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    During our drive into the Nagda Lake area, I asked the driver to stop so that I could take a short hike up a hill to visit some peasant houses that I saw. My first family wasn't so receptive and grudgingly agreed to take a photo. They didn't really understand what I was doing, I think. A second family though invited me into their home, which has a rustic slate roof, through which I could see daylight. The home was very simple and crude, but the husband was handsome and his wife rather beautiful. At that time, my portrait taking skills with such people with whom I could not communicate were rudimentary, but I managed to get a great shot of this handsome if underfed family. Just as I put a coin into the palm of the woman, the car horn honked and I waved goodbye. The woman and I had struck up a bond of sorts, as she tearfully ran after me pleading me to stay longer. I would like to visit this family again sometime, but chances are I will never have the opportunity.

    Hindu Woman in the Countryside Near Udaipur A Peasant Family and Home Near Udaipur Hindu Man and His House Near Udaipur First Family Portrait Near Udaipure Two Curious Boys Near Home Outside Udaipur
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • atufft's Profile Photo

    Ranakpur Entrance and More Architectural Details

    by atufft Updated May 4, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Ranakpurs Entrance is actually pretty unassuming considering the grandeur of the architecture as was seen in the distance. As with any Jain temple, there is no entrance fee. I should relate that along the road leading to Ranakpur, we passed Jain faithful dress in white cotton pajamas with what appear to be surgical masks on their faces. Our driver told us that these believers held life so sacred that they didn't want to accidentally swallow any insects, and so the masks to screen their mouths. Another thing to notice is the excellent foundation details and outstanding solid construction of this building. The placement must be on firm soil, but there are also gardens as shown in subsequent tips. There are also a number of outbuildings, some of which may be older than the main Ranakpur temple. The one shown in this series of tips appears to have a roof protecting a much more ancient sacred monument.

    Ranakpur Detail on Foundation Ranakpur Window Detail Ranakpur Main Entrance General View of Ranakpur Unknown Ranakpur Sacred Monument
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Religious Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • atufft's Profile Photo

    Lake Nagda Ghats

    by atufft Updated May 5, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    There are of course many lakes in the regions, most of them reservoirs of sorts that retain the water through the dry season. During our visit, we were often captivated by the ordinary duties of bathing and laundry on the lake. In this series of images, not the related cropping of an elderly woman whose grey hair is long. These Indians did not appear unhealthy or underfed. What's remarkable to me is the connectedness of the village Indians to the water. There are similar lakes in California, but the access to them is over gravelly or mud beaches, whereas the ghats provide a wonderful marble shelf from which to reach into the water. I've always loved to swim and bathe in the alpine lakes of California, but the water isn't near so warm as in the region around Udaipur. Probably, these villagers see no advantage nor romance in such natural methods of bathing and laundry, and certainly over time I would tire of it, but the open air and seemingly fresh water was very nice at Nagda and Eklingi.

    Ghats at Nagda Lake Close-up of Activity at Nagda Lake Ghats Old Woman Bathing at Nagda The Ghats at Nagda Lake Nagda Lake and its Ghats
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Religious Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • atufft's Profile Photo

    Garden Views from Inside Ranakpur

    by atufft Updated May 4, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    There are second and third floor balconies where one can peer out across the lovely surrounding countryside. Ranakpur is an active temple with gardens to feed those that live there, and there are several minor temples that can also be seen in the distance. Here also are other memorable images from the exterior and artistic interior of the great Ranakpur Temple. This tip deserves a rating just for the effort of bringing them to you. Now, it's your turn to visit and photograph this highly photogenic monument:-)

    View from Ranakpur Temple to Countryside Interior Art of Ranakpur Balcony with Monkeys General View of Ranakpur Gardens at Ranakpur
    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Farm Stay

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Udaipur

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

26 travelers online now

Comments

Udaipur Off The Beaten Path

Reviews and photos of Udaipur off the beaten path posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Udaipur sightseeing.

View all Udaipur hotels