Kolkata (Calcutta) Warnings and Dangers

  • Warnings and Dangers
    by Donna_in_India
  • Warnings and Dangers
    by Donna_in_India
  • Warnings and Dangers
    by Donna_in_India

Most Recent Warnings and Dangers in Kolkata (Calcutta)

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    Money Matters

    by Donna_in_India Written Sep 8, 2013

    1. Double-check all hotel and restaurant bills for errors.

    2. Don't leave cash and valuables in your hotel room. Use room safes where available.

    3. Keep daily cash in separate pockets.

    4. Don't flash jewelry or large sums of money.

    5. Never pay for anything upfront - including drivers.

    6. Avoid touts!

    7. Don't exchange money on the black market.

    8. Get a receipt when changing money at an authorized establishment.

    9. Carry small bills (Rs 10, 20, 50, 100) for tips, public transportation, etc.

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    Traveling with Infants/Toddlers

    by Donna_in_India Written Sep 8, 2013

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    Indians adore children and you will see (and hear) children all over - at all times - of the day and night. So your children will be welcomed warmly. But if your infant/toddler is new to travelling or is not a good traveler, India may not be the best place to visit. As difficult as India may be for some first time visitors, it will be much more so for a very young child.

    My daughter spent the first 11 months of her life in India. While things were diffifult then, we were able to control alot of the situations. All baby items - formula, diapers, wipes, baby food, etc. were easily available, although formula in particular, was 3 times the price as in the U.S.

    When we returned to India when my daughter was 19 months old, things were different. Mostly because SHE was now much more mobile. It was a very toddler un-friendly place in that there are few or no facilities for children that age.

    With the exception of 5 star hotels and Western food chains (McDonalds, Pizza Hut, etc.) you won't find high chairs. Sometimes cribs are available - although once we got a hospital crib sent over to our hotel. Car seats are almost unheard of - even if you bring your own, most taxis don't even have seat belts to hold them in. Roads and sidewalks are full of cracks, potholes, etc. - and traffic is chaotic - making using a stroller a bad adventure. Short rides in rickshaws meant breathing in the pollution coming from cars, trucks, buses, and other rickshaws. The only changing table I came across was in Mumbai's domestic airport's new "family" room, making changing diapers anywhere else generally difficult. I had to continuously watch what she touched, what she walked in, etc. On top of all that, even with eating in good establishments, she got a stomach bug twice in 2 1/2 weeks. Hardly ideal for very young children.

    In addition, Western children attract alot of attention. You will have people wanting to take photos/videos, pinching cheeks, and physically trying to take the child from your arms to hold him/her. When trying to get the child's attention people will click and snap their fingers loudly
    wihin a few inches of the child's face (most annoying!!). All of it can be very overwhelming for both the parents and the child. I was never comfortable about the photos and if asked would politely decline. We were not always asked though and it was annoying to turn around and have a camera in her face. I was not comfortable with anyone touching my daughter either. She was once pinched so hard, she had a mark on her cheek for an hour afterwards!

    Although there are parks and some (mostly not so good) zoos, children this young are inevitably going to be bored with seeing temples, markets, and forts. Throw in heat and humidity (and any or all of the above issues) and you have all the makings for a miserable time for all.

    Of course, India is likely a fascinating place and totally different experience for older children. However, if you're bringing an infant/toddler to India, I'd recommend doing the following:

    Contact your child's pediatrician regarding necessary vaccinations. (You may need to contact the Center for Disease Control/whatever agency is appropriate in your country first.) In particular, find out about malaria prevention and mosquito repellent (as some are not appropriate for young children).

    Bring plenty of disinfectant hand wipes and/or hand gel. Wash your child's hands frequently.

    Eat safely (no street stall foods, no buffets, eat fruits/veg that can be peeled and well-cooked food, drink sealed bottled water).

    Use sun screen/mosquito repellent, put a hat and sunglasses on your child.

    Wear closed shoes, not sandals.

    Bring a first aid kit including (at least): Band-aids, antiseptic wipes/ointment, tweezers, thermometer, age-appropriate pain/fever medicine & stomach/anti diarrhea medicine (check with your doctor for perscription meds), appropriate antibiotics for common childhood infections (such as middle ear infections), diaper rash ointment.

    Bring a favorite blanket and stuffed animal.

    Keep your child very close in crowded places.

    Beware of stray dogs and monkeys!

    Most of all realize that your child needs to take breaks - for naps, a swim - so work around your child's schedule - including possible jetlag. Avoid hours on end on public transporation (buses, trains, even taxis). There are many budget airlines in India - no charge for children under 2.

    If your child does become sick, seek out a doctor immediately. Most hotels can recommend a doctor, medical clinic, or hospital.

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    Mischievous Monkeys...

    by Donna_in_India Written Sep 8, 2013

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    You will come across monkeys in many places in India - everywhere from temples to forts to jungles. The monkeys in the jungles are not used to interaction with humans and there is less chance they will bother you.

    The monkeys that have been fed by humans are more likely to become aggressive - especially when they want more food. While the monkeys may look really cute, you have to remember that even though they'll take food right from your hand, they are still WILD animals.

    You usually can purchase bananas, etc. near wherever there are monkeys. We've never had a problem feeding monkeys when there was a group of people around who were also feeding the monkeys. But we've had a few unpleasant encounters with monkeys when no one else was around.

    Some suggestions:

    Keep track of all the monkeys around you. If you get distracted with one monkey, another may run up to you and try to grab the food.

    Don't carry food in the open and don't carry any plastic bags.

    If you're walking through a wooded area/forest you may want to carry some kind of walking stick. Be vigilant about the monkeys overhead in trees.

    Hold tightly onto your purse, camera, etc. because they are very mischievous - and fast - and
    will grab your belongings and run.

    Monkey bites are very serious and diseases can be passed through their saliva. If you do get bitten, clean the wound and see a doctor immediately!!

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    Safety & Police

    by Donna_in_India Written Sep 8, 2013

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    1. Within India dial 100 or 108 for police.

    2. Within India dial 101 or 108 for medical or fire emergency.

    3. Be aware of your surroundings. Report any suspicious activity/packages, etc. to police.

    4. Although it is common in India, do not offer bribes. If anyone asks for a bribe tell them you will report them to the Anit-Corruption Bureau or the nearest police station.

    5. Always carry your passport with you. Put a sticky note inside with the local telephone number of your Consulate.

    6. Do not buy, sell, or use narcotics. You do NOT want to end up in an Indian prison!!

    7. Be aware of travel warnings. Some areas are considered unsafe for foreigners.

    8. Never accept a ride if there's someone accompanying the driver in a taxi or rickshaw.

    9. Chain-lock your door when inside your hotel room.

    10. Don't flash jewelry or large sums of money.

    12. Be particularly careful with your belongings (including wallets/purses) in crowds.

    11. See my separate Warnings for Women.

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    Respect & Common Courtesies

    by Donna_in_India Written Sep 8, 2013

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    1. Learn at least Hello, Thank you, Yes, No, and Goodbye in Hindi (at least).

    2. Turn your cell phones off inside churches, temples, museums, etc. If it rings and you must take the call, do it outside!

    3. If there’s a running commentary (live or recorded) or you're on a guided tour, be polite and be quiet.

    4. Dress appropriately and be respectful in temples, churches, mosques. ALWAYS remove your shoes (it's a good idea to carry or wear socks so you don't have to go barefoot). It's a good idea to carry a cover for your head as well.

    5. If you’re traveling with children, don’t let them disrupt others around you. If they cry or throw a tantrum, take them outside.

    6. If you have a complaint, do it reasonably without yelling and cursing.

    7. Please use dust bins/garbage pails!

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    Health & Eating

    by Donna_in_India Written Sep 8, 2013

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    1. Drink bottled water (check to confirm seal has not been broken). Do NOT drink tap water or any water served in a restaurant in a glass unless you saw it being poured from a sealed bottle.

    2. Mind what you eat. One of my great joys while travelling in India is eating street foods. If you're not used to the food or have a sensitive stomach, eat only food that is cooked (and hot), fruit that can be peeled, etc.

    3. Bring stomach medications from home that you know work, just in case.

    4. Contact the health center in your home country for information on vaccinations and medications. This should be done several weeks before your trip as some medications need to be started weeks before your trip.

    5. Avoid eating at buffets, even at 5-star hotels.

    6. Wash your hands before eating, after using the bathroom, and other times as necessary.

    7. Carry wet ones or hand sanitizers.

    8. Be careful of "duplicate" liquor.

    9. Don't eat in an empty restaurant. Food may not be fresh. Follow the locals to the good (and usually inexpensive) restaurants.

    10. Avoid ice.

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    Taking Photos

    by Donna_in_India Written Sep 8, 2013

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    1. If there are signs saying “No photos”, don’t take pictures! (Some airports & bridges, Military Bases, etc. are off-limits!)

    2. Learn how to use your camera before the trip. If there are signs saying “No flash”, make sure you know how to use the camera without it.

    3. If you see a couple or family where one person taking pictures of the other(s), offer to take a picture of both/all of them. Maybe they’ll reciprocate.

    4. Don't take pictures of worshippers.

    5. Ask BEFORE you take a photo of someone. (It's easy to gesture with your camera if someone doesn't understand English.) Most people will say yes. I've rarely come across anyone that doesn't want to have his/her photo taken. Share the photo in your playback screen - children especially love this and it's a good way to make new friends! I've had alot of fun with people and their reactions to being photographed and then seeing themselves.

    6. You'll be visiting a lot of caves, forts, temples, etc. that may be hard to identify when you return home. Before entering, take a photo of a sign with the name of the place (each! cave, etc.).

    7. Keep an eye on your camera equipment all the time!

    8. Bring more digital photo cards/film than you think you will need. Bring an extra battery.

    9. Charge your camera batteries every night.

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    Women Travlers

    by Donna_in_India Written Sep 8, 2013

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    1. Unless on the beaches of Goa, it's best to dress conservatively. No shorts, short skirts, or shirts displaying too much cleavage. You will have to endure uncomfortable stares, and sometimes comments and even "accidental" touching. (Capris & t-shrits are fine.)

    2. If someone does touch you or becomes aggressive, yell LOUDLY. They will likely run away and you will attract the attention of others who will come to your rescue.

    3. Avoid walking in deserted areas at night or odd hours.

    4. Avoid drinking alcohol in excess.

    5. Never accept food or drinks from strangers.

    6. Carry tissue/toilet paper. You never know when you'll need it!

    7. Where available, use women's only areas/compartments on public transportation. NEVER ride in the general men's compartment.

    8. If you do go out to clubs/bars, NEVER leave your drink unattended and always make sure you have transportation back to your hotel pre-arranged.

    9. If travelling alone on the train, request to be accommodated near other women travelers.

    10. Never accept a ride if there's someone accompanying the driver in a taxi or rickshaw.

    11. Chain-lock your door when inside your hotel room.

    12. If you happen to come across a street party or a festive procession, it is best not to take part. Crowds such as those will likely have agressive and/or drunk men. You can watch from a distance and move on when it has passed you.

    13. If travelling with a boyfriend/husband it's best to avoid public displays of affection, which can attract lewd remarks and gestures.

    14. Use common sense and trust your instincts.

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    Travel Within India

    by Donna_in_India Written Sep 8, 2013

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    Travel Within India:

    1. If not taking a prepaid taxi or a metered taxi/rickshaw, negotiate the fare before taking off.

    2. If spending a lot of time with a taxi driver (or any driver), it helps if he speaks and understands basic English.

    3. Don't drive on highways at night.

    4. When travelling by train, chain and lock your luggage under your berth. Don't keep anything valuable near the window. Carry plenty of water and fruit, and don't eat or drink anything offered by a stranger.

    5. Be aware of travel warnings. Some areas are considered unsafe for foreigners.

    6. Always carry your passport with you. Put a sticky note inside with the local telephone number of your Consulate.

    7. Keep a copy of your passport/visa separate from the original.

    8. For women, where available, use women's only areas/compartments on public transportation. NEVER ride in the general men's compartment.

    9. For women, if travelling alone on the train, request to be accommodated near other women travellers.

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    Begging Business!!!

    by mamtap Written Aug 29, 2011

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    Feels Bad...but no other option :(

    Kolkata is mostly full of beggars. You'll find every designs and patterns of beggar in Kolkata. You'll see them when you are in traffic, hanging out with friends, eating, walking on the roads. Mostly they are attracted to the foreigners. Please avoid them as much as you can so else they can spoil your peaceful visit to Kolkata. If you give money to one of them, the whole flock will come and chase you.

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  • Advance Booking with full payment at Bar b q

    by mayurbengani Written Jul 14, 2011

    Guys beware. Book Bar b q, kolkata in advance and paying full amount at your own risk. The managers at Barbq, thinks they have every right to mistreat such a person. I had one of the worst experiences of my life, today. My sister had lovingly booked a dinner for me and my wife on our first anniversary. One Mr. peter, who by his own admission is the God of Bar b q, treated us as if we had come uninvited. I had politely asked him to shift my seat to a different table to which his curt reply was that I have to take that table only and no other table can be allocated to me. When I argued that its illogical, his reply was that either I take that or leave. All this while even though I was talking politely, he was hell bent on making me leave the place without having my dinner. I said that I wanted another table and I am willing to wait. His first reaction was that then I have to wait for 45 mins. When I agreed , he told me that there are few other tables upstairs and I can go there. When I reached upstairs I was informed that this place is not for family. I still had my dinner since I was in noo mood to spoil my first anniversary.
    The experience had left me shaken about the quality of service offered in Bar b q. I would really like to narrate my tale to the owners of Bar b q (if there is any1 beyond Mr. Peter) and appreciate if anyone can lead me to him.

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    Howragh Train Station = HELL

    by global-drifter Written Nov 28, 2010

    I make my way to Howragh train station, to find out some facts about train travel to Varanasi the next day. It is incredibly daunting the first time around, there are people everywhere and upon first appearances, it resembles a refugee camp more than a train station. After spending some time here, I decide that it is in fact hell on Earth. The food options are limited, the ground is littered with rats and garbage. The smell of human waste is overpowering. This is a stifling and unforgiving environment, I figure to hell with it - the travel agent can get his commission fee of 50 rupees. I just want to get the hell out of here.

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    Cycle-Rickshaw Madness

    by global-drifter Written Nov 9, 2010

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    When you approach them, they are so happy to see you and for a chance to rip you off. I reason though that these men are poor (many don't even own their own rickshaws but rent them and make little to no money), and their prices are still remarkably cheap. For example, it costs just $1 to go from one suburb to another, definitely not breaking the bank! What annoys me though, is that in their pursuit of cash, they will say they know where they're going even when they don't. Sometimes they'll stop in the middle of nowhere, with your view undoubtedly obscured by trees or buildings, and tell you that your destination is just around the corner. I fell for this once, but from now on will not leave the rickshaw unless I'm certain.

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    Unprecedented Bund or Flash Strike in Bengal.

    by goutammitra Written May 27, 2010

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    Mamata Banerjee ( Trinamool Congress)
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    I never wanted to write this tip but I decided to write after four years of my Kolkata page as now it seems it does deserve a place here. Please be warned before coming to Kolkata, please check whether there is a Bund declared by any political party. Bund means all closure of activity , transport, airport, office, school etc, in one word it means to paralyze life in the city, district or state.They think , it's a very effective medium to protest their grievances to the Ruling Govt. But what happens the Ruling party calls for Bunds 3/4 times in a year! Every one knows it's a nuisance, all the political party denounce it but they themselves call Bund in the slightest of provocation or attack on their interest.

    The two major political parties Trinamool Congress led by Ms. Mamata Banerjee and Communist Party of India led by Biman Basu in West Bengal and their associates even Indian National Congress are in the habit calling Bund every now and then. They have really mastered the art of calling Bund. There are at least 5/6 Bunds in a year in West Bengal or in Kolkata city. Not only this , they are in the habit of programing it in such way that the day is clubbed with the weekend , so the Lazy/ Crooked people can three days a Paid holiday at a stretch! It is unbelievable and unheard of in the other parts of India. When a Bund is called it is always for 12 or 24 hrs, everything is closed or the goons from the political parties will ensure that you remain indoor. Once Bund is called, all running trains comes to halt, aircrafts do not fly, taxis do not ply, all shops, restaurants, business establishments are closed. They say hospitals are exempted but in almost all the Bunds declared by the these parties , ensured that the patients suffer and doctors do not go to the hospitals or do not attend the patients. On the recent Bund this month ( May2010)called CITU ( Trade union of Marxist govt of West Bengal) put a lock on the airport toilet. This was inhuman and this the real ugly face of West Bengal.

    Let us condemn them, this was not present before communist came in power in seventies.

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    The traffic in Kolkata is chaotic

    by georeiser Written May 16, 2010

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    The traffic in Kolkata
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    The traffic in Kolkata is chaotic and for me as a tourist it looks like the drivers disregard any traffic rules. There are no "zipper-method" when two cars want to drive at the same time. They use the horn all the time, or at least every 5 seconds. The more you use the horn, the stronger you look like. "OK, you win this time, but I shall win in the next crossroad." Forget about self-driving.

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