Red fort, Delhi

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  • red fort structures
    red fort structures
    by husain
  • Barracks in the fort
    Barracks in the fort
    by husain
  • Diwan-e-aam: Red Fort
    Diwan-e-aam: Red Fort
    by husain
  • husain's Profile Photo

    Structures within the fort

    by husain Written Oct 22, 2006

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Barracks in the fort
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    Favorite thing: After the `First war of independence' in 1857, or as the British called it: `the sepoy mutiny', where there were several armed uprisings against the occupation of India by the British thru the `East India Company', much of the Red fort was occupied and destroyed by the British army.
    Many of the structures within were razed and Barracks were built in their place for British troops.
    The contrasting architecture within the fort still survives and the somewhat ugly barracks can still be seen right in the middle of some of the most elegant buildings from the Mughal era...
    Large parts of the fort were also used by the Indian Army in recent years to house soldiers, but the courts ordered them to vacate recently and the remaining part of the fort is due to be handed back to the Archeological Survey soon and opened to the public

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    The Red fort

    by husain Updated Oct 22, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Diwan-e-aam: Red Fort
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    Favorite thing: This 17th century Mughal fort, also known to the locals as Lal Quila was constructed by Shah Jahan (who also made the Taj mahal), when he shifted his empires capital from Agra to the newly planned city of Shahjahanabad in Delhi in 1638. It represents a period which was the peak of the Mughal era.
    The fort houses the Diwan-e-am, the hall for public audience with the emperor, where he would hear public grievances etc, and the Diwan-e-khas, the hall of private audiences with the emperor.
    These and other mughal era features are common to the Agra fort and the Lahore fort.

    The fort has political significance in todays India, since the Prime minister addresses the nation from here on Independence day, on August 15th every year.

    Take the underground metro service to Red Fort. The most central access points to the metro are probably Connaught Place and India Gate (Central Secretariat stations). Thats probably the best way to reach any of the Old Delhi areas these days.

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    Delhi Gate and the Walled City

    by husain Written Oct 21, 2006

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    A roadside barber outside Delhi Gate

    Favorite thing: In the early 17th century, when the Mughal emperor Shahjahan (who also built the Red Fort and the Taj Mahal) decided to build an `imperial city', the plan included a wall on all sides. Today, this part of Delhi is know as Old Delhi, and includes the Chandni Chowk, Red Fort, Jama Masjid areas... It is also referred to sometimes as `The walled City', though only fragments of the original wall are visible today.
    There were huge gates and smaller windows through which people could enter or exit the city.
    The city was said to have 14 gates, one of which was the Delhi Gate. This gate was often used, by the Emperor when he proceeded to the Jama Masjid for the Friday prayers.

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  • Absolutely see the redfort,the...

    by indyj001 Written Aug 25, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Absolutely see the redfort,the parliament buildings.. the whole city is worth seeing ..Best way to see is to join a tour that will not only take you around the city but will also show you the best places ..old but yet preserved.The kutub Minar in Delhi was one of the 7 wonders of the world..a must see !INDIA gate resembles the Arc de triumph in paris.

    Fondest memory: Food!Excellent food ..spicy and curry go well together in every resrtaurant.

    Sound and light show in Siri Fort.

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    Red Fort

    by SirRichard Written Aug 25, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: RED FORT
    The main attraction in Old Delhi. The outer walls are really impressive, all coloured in red.
    Built in 1639 by Shah Jahan (again!!), the work was completed in 1648. The fort housed halls of public and private audience, domed and arched marble palaces, plush private apartments, a mosque, and elaborately designed gardens. It was attacked by the British soldiers, during the war of independence in 1857.

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    Red Fort

    by Bjorgvin Written Aug 24, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Visit the Red Fort. Lal Qila (Red Fort) along the Yamuna River is built of red sandstone and surrounded by a wall of about 2.4km. The Mughal King Shah Jahan (the king who built the Taj Mahal of Agra) transferred his capital from Agra to Delhi in 1639 and the fort was completed in 1648. The fort has two main entrances, the Delhi Gate and the Lahori Gate. In this fort the king granted audiences to the public and to important persons. An interesting Light and Sound Show is held at the fort in the evenings.

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