Firoz Shah Kotla, Delhi

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  • Firoz Shah Kotla
    by smirnofforiginal
  • Firoz Shah Kotla
    by smirnofforiginal
  • Firoz Shah Kotla
    by smirnofforiginal
  • smirnofforiginal's Profile Photo

    Kotla Firoz Shah

    by smirnofforiginal Written May 4, 2010

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    The citadel of Firozabad was the 5th city of Delhi. Emperor Firoz Shah Tughlaq built Firozabad and its citadel in 1354.

    Once a beautiful palace little remains here now. A pparently a lot of the remains were used in the construction of otherbuilding around Delhi.

    The ticket office is to the left as you face the entrance (mind your head on the low entrance gate!).
    There is a fee for photography - this was one place that I objected paying for my camera as I was rather untaken with the grum py man on the entrance and was unimpressed with the ruins - I did not feel they warranted an additional cost!

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Archeology

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    Firoz Shah Kotla – Jami Masjid

    by Willettsworld Written Apr 5, 2007
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    This mosque built by Firoz Shah Tughlaq in 1354 is among the few surviving buildings inside the citadel. This was the largest of the seven mosques built in Delhi during Tughlaq's reign. The main entrance to the mosque is to the north on account of the proximity of the river to its eastern wall. The cloisters on the sides of its courtyard and its prayer hall have disappeared with only a rear wall standing on the western side. This mosque was visited by Sultan Timur towards the end of 1398 to say his prayers and he was so impressed by the design of this building that he took some masons and artisans along with him to Samarkand where he built a mosque on the same pattern.

    Open: Sunrise to Sunset everyday. Admission: Rs100 for foreigners.

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    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

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    Firoz Shah Kotla – Ashokan Pillar

    by Willettsworld Written Apr 5, 2007
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    Located north of Jami Masjid in the citadel stands the 13 meter high sandstone Ashokan Pillar dating from the 3rd century B.C. on a rubble-built three-tired pyramidal structure. Firoz Shah Tughlaq brought this 27 tonne pillar to Delhi from Topar in Ambala, where the great Emperor Ashoka erected it.

    The pillar has seven main inscriptions or edicts of Emperor Ashoka, apart from some figures and many minor inscriptions. Written in Brahmi script in the Pali language, James Prinsep first deciphered the edicts in 1837. Like all Ashokan Pillars, this pillar also served the purpose of spreading Buddhism and its doctrines among the people. Though made of sandstone, the pillar was so polished that even today it looks as if it is made of some metal.

    Open: Sunrise to Sunset everyday. Admission: Rs100 for foreigners.

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel

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  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Firoz Shah Kotla

    by Willettsworld Written Apr 5, 2007
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    The great builder and Emperor Firoz Shah Tughlaq (1351-88), nephew of Ghiyasuddin Tughlaq and successor of Muhammad Tughlaq built the city of Ferozabad with its citadel in 1354. He built it along the banks of the River Yamuna in Firozabad, the fifth city of Delhi, which entended from Hauz-Khas to Pir-Ghaib near Hindu Rao Hospital. The citadel contained palaces, pillared halls, mosques, a pigeon tower and a baoli. Among these was the famed tall pyramidal structure supporting the Ashokan Pillar and the Jami Masjid (mosque). Most of the building material from Firoz Shah's city was robbed to build Shahjahanabad (1638-48) where the Red Fort is located today. Firoz Shah Tughlaq was a renowned builder whose reign is credited with the construction of several mosques, hunting lodges, reservoirs for irrigation, embankments and colleges in and around delhi. The site was virtually deserted when I visited and I was the only foreigner there.

    Open: Sunrise to Sunset everyday. Admission: Rs100 for foreigners.

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    • Archeology
    • Castles and Palaces

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    Firozshah Kotla/ Ashoka Pillar

    by husain Written Oct 22, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Ashokan Pillar at Firoz Shah Kotla
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    Built by Firoz Shah Tughlaq in 1354, Firozabad, is also known as `the fifth city of Delhi'.
    Firoz Shah was a great builder and his capital was said to be full of impressive palaces, gardens and mosques. Much of the city was destroyed during the civil wars that followed his death, and especially during the Mongol conqueror Timur`s invasion of Delhi- after which the city was reduced to rubble...
    Inside the fortress-palace of Firoz Shah, there is an Ashoka pillar with Ashoka's edicts- about the ten commandments of the Buddha. The 13 metre high column was found at a location a fair diatance away from Delhi, but was transported carefully from there and mounted on a pyramidical structure built specifically for the pillar. The fact that the pillar was put up at a high pedestal signifies that firoz Shah attached great value to this find, even though he may not have fully understood its revelance.
    The ruins of an old mosque and a well can also be seen in the area.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology
    • Castles and Palaces

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