Governmental Palace, Delhi

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    Government Buildings
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    Government Buildings
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  • Government Buildings
    Government Buildings
    by Jim_Eliason
  • Rupanworld's Profile Photo

    Parliament House

    by Rupanworld Written Jan 18, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Sansad Bhavan is the Parliament of India. It has the President of India and two houses, the lower house, or the Lok Sabha and the upper house, the Rajya Sabha. It is situated on the Sansad Marg. The building is circular in shape and was designed by two British architects, viz., Sir Edwin Lutyens and Sir Herbert Baker in 1912–1913. However, the construction took place between 1921 and 1927. It is not open to access of tourist. The nearest you can go is upto the road in your car.

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    Indian Parliament and Moghul Architecture

    by Beefy_SAFC Updated Oct 28, 2007
    Poll at Indian Parliament
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    Poll the Parrot can be seen next to the Indian Parliament building, the heart of the largest democracy on earth, with over 1 billion eligible voters. Built originally by the British as they relocated the capital of India from Calcutta (now called Kolkota) to Delhi, this remained the seat of government when India gained independence in 1947.

    There is also much Moslem inspired architecture, dating from Mogul times before British rule - the Mosque above is very much in the Persian style I was surrounded by in Uzbekistan. The reason for all this Mogul architecture is simple - the founder of the Moguls (corruption of Mongols), Barbur, originated from Uzbekistan. Barbur, born in Samarkand and descended from both Genghis Khan and the Timurid ruler Tarmerlane (of which Babur was more proud), was kicked out of his homeland by the invading Uzbeks (not native to modern day Uzbekistan, by the way) and driven into exile in Afghanistan. After a few failed attempts to recapture Samarkand, he turned his attention east to the rich pickings on Northern India, usurping a previous Islamic regime. Most of the Mogul buildings in Delhi and Agra can be attributed to Barbur and descendents.

    Within feet of the Indian Parliament, an Egret plods away in a fountain totally unphased by the locals, traffic, tourists and hawkers pestering them with chess sets and postcards only a short distance away.

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    Parliament House

    by RAJASTHANBYCAR Updated Sep 25, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Sansad Bhavan where the constitution of India wasd
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    Very close to Rashtrapati Bhavan is situated the imposing Parliament House building another creation of the genius of Lutyens and Baker. It is a huge circular, colonnaded building where the sessions of Parliament are held.It has a dome-shaped circular Central Hall and three semi-circular structures, the Rajya Sabha, (Upper House), Lok Sabha( Lower House) and the library. A verandah with as many as 144 columns and the boundary wall has blocks of sandstone carved in geometrical patterns, that remind one of the Mughal jaalis.No one is allowed to enter the gates without a valid permit and to obtain a visitor's pass, Indian nationals need to apply to the Parliament Secretariat and foreign nationals through their embassies or high commissions.

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  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Parliament House

    by Willettsworld Written Apr 9, 2007

    A large country needs a large parliament building and India's is pretty big measuring 75 feet high and 570 feet in diameter. Known as the Sansad Bhavan, it was originally planned to be just an extension of the Viceroy's House (Rashtrapati Bhavan) but after the Montague-Chelmsford reforms of 1919, it was designated as a Parliament House or Legislative Assembly of the country.

    Designed by Herbert Baker, the Duke of Connaught laid the foundation stone of the building on 12th February 1921. Inaugurated by Lady and Lord Irwin in 1927, the building was designed in such a way that it houses a domed central hall and three semi-circular structures, originally meant to accommodate the Chamber of Princes, the Council of State and the Legislative Assembly. Presently they house the Chambers of the Lok Sabha (Lower House of Parliament), the Rajya Sabha (Upper House of Parliament) and the Parliament library. Today the Lok Sabha has 550 seats. Of these, 530 members are elected representatives of the Indian states and 20 elected members represent Union Territories (territories governed by the Central (Federal) government). The Rajya Sabha has 250 members, 238 of whom represent states and Union Territories and the 12 nominated members are nominated on the basis of eminence in the fields of arts, sciences, literature etc.

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  • schlumpf's Profile Photo

    Governament buildings

    by schlumpf Written Jan 11, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Very closed from India Gate, you will find few buildings that rae the governament buildings, you will detect is as there will be a lot of army on the entrances.
    As you cannot enter or even stop on the side of those buildings, you can just watch them from the car...so...

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  • ashishashar's Profile Photo

    The Parliament House

    by ashishashar Written Aug 24, 2002

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    Sansad Bhawan or the Parliament house is the supreme law making body in the country. It is the center of power and politicians decide the fate of the Indian Democracy here. Visitors are not allowed inside the house but when the house is in session, visitors may take permission to go inside and watch the proceedings of the house. The parliament consists of three halls- Lok Sabha, Rajya Sabha and the central hall. For the foreign visitors permits are given only after they obtain an introductory letter from the respective embassy.

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  • Jim_Eliason's Profile Photo

    Government Buildings

    by Jim_Eliason Updated Sep 8, 2013

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Government Buildings
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    At the end of Raj path are the colonial era building that now house the Indian government. They were built in the 1920's when the British transfered the capital to Delhi from Mumbai.

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    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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  • grets's Profile Photo

    Sansad Bhavan

    by grets Written May 30, 2005

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    The Parliament building.

    New Delhi was such a contrast to Old Delhi - wide tree-lined avenues and modern buildings. It was tourist-less and people-less due to a public holiday.

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  • sandravdp's Profile Photo

    In fornt of the governmental...

    by sandravdp Written Sep 7, 2002

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    In fornt of the governmental palace are the gate and some canons. The old canons look very pretty as well as the little elephant statues on the gate.

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  • sandravdp's Profile Photo

    Go and see the Governmental...

    by sandravdp Written Sep 7, 2002

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    Go and see the Governmental Palace in Delhi. You can't enter it, but also from the outside the view is very nice. My boyfriend has made this picture through the palacegate.

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