Gurdwara Bangla Sahib Sikh Temple, Delhi

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  • Sikh devotees inside Gurdwara Bangla Sahib
    Sikh devotees inside Gurdwara Bangla...
    by vinod-bhojak
  • Gurdwara Bangla Sahib
    Gurdwara Bangla Sahib
    by vinod-bhojak
  • Sunset View from Gurdwara Bangla Sahib
    Sunset View from Gurdwara Bangla Sahib
    by vinod-bhojak
  • vinod-bhojak's Profile Photo

    Gurdwara Bangla Sahib: A sikh Temple in Delhi

    by vinod-bhojak Written Dec 18, 2013

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Gurdwara Bangla Sahib
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    Gurdwara Bangla Sahib is the most prominent Sikh gurdwara, or Sikh house of worship, in Delhi, known for its association with the eighth Sikh Guru, Guru Har Krishan, and the pond inside its complex, known as the "Sarovar", whose water is considered holy by Sikhs and is known as "Amrit". It was first built as a small temple by Sikh General, Sardar Bhagel Singh in 1783, who supervised the construction of nine Sikh shrines in Delhi in the same year, during the reign of Mughal Emperor, Shah Alam II.It is situated near Connaught Place, New Delhi and is instantly recognise by its stunning golden dome and tall flagpole, Nishan Sahi
    Gurdwara Bangla Sahib was originally a bungalow belonging to Raja Jai Singh, an Indian ruler in the seventeenth century, and was known as Jaisinghpura Palace, in Jaisingh Pura, an historic neighbourhood demolished to make way for the Connaught Place, shopping district

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    Gurudwara Sis Ganj Sahib

    by goutammitra Written Sep 3, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    We at Gurudwara Sis Ganj Sahib.
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    Gurdwara Sri Guru Sis Ganj Sahib The Gurdwara Sis Ganj Sahib is built at the site in the Chandni Chowk area of Old Delhi, where the ninth Sikh Guru, Guru Tegh Bahadur was beheaded on the orders of the Mughal emperor in 1675 AD, Aurangzeb, for refusing to convert to Islam. Before his body could be quartered and exposed to public view, it was stolen under the cover of darkness by one of his disciples, Lakhi Shah Vanjara, who then burnt his house to cremate the Guru's body. This place is marked by another Gurdwara, Gurdwara Rakab Ganj Sahib. The severed head ("Sis") of Guru Tegh Bahadur was brought to Anandpur Sahib by Bhai Jaita, another disciple of the Guru. It was cremated by the Guru's son, Gobind Rai, who would later become Guru Gobind Singh, the tenth and last Guru of the Sikhs.

    This also when Sri Guru Govind Singh took the pledge to fight back Aurngzeb's forces and established The Khalsa Panth( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Khalsa; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guru_Gobind_Singh), to save the Hindus from the atrocities of Aurangzeb and his force.

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    Gurudwara Sisganj

    by diageva Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Sisganj Gurudwara

    Guru Teg Bahadur was beheaded under the trunk of a Banyan tree.
    As we came here we saw that the building's stairs where with running water, so we looked where we could leave our shoes. As we asked they took us to the information office. There a sikh man guide us through the temple and explain us all about sikh traditions.
    About the not cuting their hair, about the equal of men and woman, and about the simbol of nife they wear.
    After a time he asked us if you wanted to eat, and we accept. He took us to a building near where lots of people where waiting, he explain us that all that people came here for eat free and that here also they could had a free place to rest or medicine.
    So we sit down at the floor with lots of people for eat.
    He asked us after for a donative that we gave with pleasure.

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  • Rupanworld's Profile Photo

    Gurdwara Sisganj

    by Rupanworld Updated Jan 30, 2009
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    Gurdwara Sisganj is a sacred place for Sikh people. It is built on the site where, the ninth guru of the Sikhs, Guru Tegh Bahadur, was killed (beheaded) on 11th november, 1675 AD under a banyan tree on the orders of Mughal Emperor Aurangzeb. He had objected to emperor Aurangzeb's use of force against the Hindus and compulsion to people to turn into islam religion. It is possible to visit the Gurdwara and on request, people from the 'Information Office' just outside the main entrance would also accompany a visitor and show around. Before entering, one has to leave shoes outside and cover the head with a cloth. After prayers, Karah, a consecrated food made of wheat and ghee as 'prasad' is received by the visitors from the gurdwara. One can also watch a huge queque of poor people waiting outside the gurdwara from early morning for the karah. The community kitchen of the gurdwara (that believes in the concept of equality of all people) cooks and feeds around 4000 people everyday and it is cooked under very good hygienic conditions.

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    Gurdwara Bangla Sahib Sikh Temple Kitchen

    by Willettsworld Written Apr 9, 2007
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    Part of the Sikh religion dictates that everyone is welcome to visit and also to eat. This means that many hundreds (if not thousands) of meals are prepared every day for however requires one. Volunteers make chapati's and cook them on large open hot plates whilst others stir up vegetable dahl in huge vats.

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    Gurdwara Bangla Sahib Sikh Temple

    by Willettsworld Written Apr 9, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    Gurdwara Bangla Sahib is the ‘Haveli’ or palace, where Guru Hari Krishan, the eighth Sikh Guru stayed during his tour to Delhi in 1664. The Guru was entertained as a royal guest by Mirza Raja Jai Singh in this ‘bangla’ (palace), which was built on the model of the existing palace of Raja Jai Singh in Jaipur.

    The large main hall has an open central shrine, where a sculpted bronze cupola hangs over a smaller golden dome under which silk sheets are spread out and covered with flowers. This is where the Guru Granth Sahib, the holy book of the Sikhs, is placed. Devotional music is played continuously and relayed through the complex. The Gurdwara complex has a higher secondary school, a museum, a bookstall, a library and a hospital. There is also a holy pond in the complex where people take holy dips and pray to the Guru. Large Koy carp swim around in it and the whole pond is surrounded by book stalls. There is also a large dinning hall which was empty when I visited as it was mid morning but they were preparing food in the kitchen with chappatis being made and curry boiling away in large vats.

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    Bangla Sahib Gurudwara New Delhi

    by RAJASTHANBYCAR Updated Feb 22, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Bangla Sahib Gurudwara
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    Bangla Sahib Gurudwara is a magnificent and spacious bungalow in Delhi owned by Raja Jai Singh Amber (Jaipur) who commanded great respect and honour in the court of Mughal Emperor Aurangzeb now enjoys the status of a holy shrine called Gurdwara Bangla Sahib. The eighth Guru Sri Harkishan had stayed here for a few months as guest of Raja Jai Singh. Since then it has become a place of pilgrimage for both, Hindus and Sikhs. They pay their respect to the memory of Guru Harkrishan, nominated as successor by the seventh Guru, Sri Har Rai. He passed away on October 6, 1661 A.D. When only a little over five year old, he had been tried and tested as a perfect fearless and fully illuminated soul.

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