Humayun Tomb, Delhi

4.5 out of 5 stars 4.5 Stars - 63 Reviews

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • Isa Khan's Tomb
    Isa Khan's Tomb
    by vinod-bhojak
  • Entrance gate of Isa Khan's Tomb
    Entrance gate of Isa Khan's Tomb
    by vinod-bhojak
  • Isa Khan's Tomb
    Isa Khan's Tomb
    by vinod-bhojak
  • vinod-bhojak's Profile Photo

    Humayun Tomb:Mosque of Isa Khan

    by vinod-bhojak Written Dec 7, 2013

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Mosque of Isa Khan
    2 more images

    At the edge of the complex, across from the tomb, lies a mosque with noticeable mehrabs. It is known as Isa Khan's Mosque, and was built along with the tomb in 1547-48 AD. Many of the architectural details present in these structures can be seen further evolved in the main Humayun's tomb, though on a much grander scale, such as the tomb being placed in a walled garden enclosure

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • vinod-bhojak's Profile Photo

    Humayun's Tomb:Isa Khan's Tomb

    by vinod-bhojak Written Dec 7, 2013

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Isa Khan's Tomb
    4 more images

    Isa Khan's tomb was built during his lifetime ca 1547-48 AD, is situated near the Mughal Emperor Humayun's Tomb complex in Delhi which was built later, between 1562-1571 AD. Built within an enclosed octagonal garden, it bears a striking resemblance to other tombs of Sur dynasty monuments in the Lodhi Gardens. This octagonal tomb has distinct ornamentation in the form of canopies, glazed tiles and lattice screens and a deep veranda, around it supported by pillars. It stand south of the Bu Halima garden just as visitors enter the complex. An inscription on a red sandstone slab indicated that the tomb is of Masnad Ali Isa Khan, son of Niyaz Aghwan, the Chief chamberlain, and was built during the reign of Islam Shah Suri, son of Sher Shah, in 1547-48 A.D. On 5 August 2011 the restoration work on this tomb in New Delhi led to the discovery of the India's oldest sunken garden. Isa Khan’s garden tomb in the enclosed area of Humayun’s Tomb World Heritage Site in the Capital of India can now be considered the earliest example of a sunken garden in India – attached to a tomb – a concept later developed at Akbar’s Tomb and at the Taj Mahal

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • vinod-bhojak's Profile Photo

    Humayun's Tomb: Arab Sarai gate

    by vinod-bhojak Updated Dec 6, 2013

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Arab Sarai gate-Humayun Tomb new Delhi
    2 more images

    The 16th century monumental Arab Sarai gateway is standing at the prime location of the World Heritage Site on the main axis leading to Humayun’s Tomb. The gateway leads to Arab Sarai, a walled enclosure erected by Hamida Banu Begum, the mother of Emperor Akbar, supposedly as a settlement for 200 Arabs whom she had brought from Mecca to help in the construction of Humayun’s Tomb.
    The gate stand 12.2 meters high fromits pilinth and its built of quartzite with redstone dressing and marbel inlay

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • vinod-bhojak's Profile Photo

    Humayun’s Tomb-Bu Halima Gate

    by vinod-bhojak Written Dec 6, 2013

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Bu Halima Gate
    3 more images

    The cream colored Bu Halima Gate comes just before the entrance to Humayun’s Tomb. This 16th century gate leads to the tomb garden of Bu Halima. Unfortunately, not much is known about Bu Halima. but it is said that she was part of Babur's entourage to India and occupied an important place in his harem. Probably a Mughal noble woman, she was also a wet nurse of Humayun

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

    Was this review helpful?

  • vinod-bhojak's Profile Photo

    Humayun's Tomb

    by vinod-bhojak Written Dec 6, 2013

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Humayun's Tomb
    4 more images

    It is amazing to see. It is known as the finest Mogul garden tomb in India and deserves its reputation.Humayun's Tomb is a World Heritage site. This place is a must see for its architecture,styles,gardens etc. This tomb was built by Humayun's first wife Bega Begum (widow) in 1573 .The tomb is in middle surrounded by beutiful gardens and water channels.The site was chosen on the banks of Yamuna river, due to its proximity to Nizamuddin Dargah, the mausoleum of the celebrated Sufi saint of Delhi, Nizamuddin Auliya, who was much revered by the rulers of Delhi, and whose residence
    It is located near the Nizamudhin Police Station. Approach road is narrow and limited parking is available. The tomb is an architectural marvel. Mughals indeed took time to construct. They built buildings with passion. Their carvings are very impressive. It is well laid out and the lawns are very nicely maintained. The first thing that hits you is the serene atmosphere. Very peaceful. If you have not studied Mughal history, then it is recommend that you hire a guide for better understanding and significance of the tomb. You need a minimum of 2 hrs. to see it.

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • goutammitra's Profile Photo

    Humayun's Tomb:Nasir ud-din Muhammad Humayun

    by goutammitra Written Aug 27, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    We in front of Humayun' s tomb

    He was second in line of The Mughal Dynasty. After Zahir-ud-din Muhammad Babur his son Nasir ud-din Muhammad Humayun became the Emperor.

    The tomb was commissioned by Humayun's wife Hamida Banu Begum in 1562 CE, and designed by Mirak Mirza Ghiyath, a Persian architect.It was the first garden-tomb on the Indian subcontinent, and is located in Nizamuddin East, Delhi, India, close to the Dina-panah citadel also known as Purana Qila, that Humayun founded in 1533.

    I am not able to locate the other pictures taken there , so I am putting one picture now.

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

    Was this review helpful?

  • husain's Profile Photo

    Humayun's Tomb

    by husain Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Humayun's tomb: the entrance
    4 more images

    The 16th century tomb of Humayun, the second of the great Mughal emperors, is a magnificent example of `Indo-Islamic' architecture. The tomb is of special significance since it was the first garden-tomb on the Indian subcontinent and it went on to inspire the designs of several major monuments, culminating in the Taj Mahal.

    It was built by Humayun's widow, nine years after his death. The architect was reportedly brought from Herat in Afghanistan, and the design was based on the description of the `gardens of paradise', as portrayed in the Quran. The design is also said to have inspired the design of the Taj Mahal, which was built by Humayun's grandson- Shah Jahan.
    It is a `World Heritage Monument' and has been recently rennovated by the Aga Khan trust(AKTC)/ Intach/ Archeological Survey of India.
    The tomb area is has several other smaller and lesser known monuments/ tombs, some that pre-date the main structure. Also, it was from here that in 1857 A.D, lieutenant Hudson had captured the last Mughal emperor Bahadur Shah II, who was subsequently exiled to Rangoon.
    I visited it recently after a gap of several years, and the rennovations have lent it a great ambience. Also, there dosent seem to be a huge crowd here, unlike some of the other popular monuments, so its a pretty serene place.
    Budget a couple of hours at least to get a real feel of this place, since there is a lot to see.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • uglyscot's Profile Photo

    Visit the Humayun Tomb

    by uglyscot Updated Aug 25, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Humayun's tomb
    4 more images

    The Tomb of Humayun was built by Bega Begum the last surviving wife of Humayun, the second emperor of the Moghul empire, in 1565. The typical Moghul garden is divided into 4 large squares, which are divided again into smaller squares by pathways. The mausoleum is in the centre and rises from a podium faced with a series of cells with arched openings. the central octagonal chamber contains the cenotaph. There are octagonal chambers at the diagonals, and arched lobbies at the sides. the openings are closed with perforated screens.
    The roof is 425 metres high with a double dome, the first, of marble with pillared kiosks around it. It is built of red sandstone.
    Several unidentified rulers are buried nearby , as well as Bega Begum, Hamida Bani Begum [a junior wife], Shah Jehan's son , later Moghuls and Bahadur Shah Ii, the last Moghul emperor of India [1857].
    To the south east is an impressive square tomb called the Barber's Tomb.

    This was my first visit to a typical Moghul building where symmetery is the keyword. The steps are steep howvever. It was also the last chance I had to really see anything close up in Delhi.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • MM212's Profile Photo

    Tomb & Mosque of Isa Khan

    by MM212 Updated Jul 29, 2010
    Isa Khan's Tomb - Feb 09
    4 more images

    Located within the Humayun complex, the Isa Khan tomb lies in a separate enclosure. It consists of the octagonal, multi-domed mausoleum and a mosque, all surrounded by an also octagonal fortress-like wall. The little complex was constructed in 1548 AD and thus predates the grander nearby Humayun's Tomb. Isa Khan Niyazi was an official under the Suri dynasty which had defeated the Delhi Sultanate and conquered their capital city for only a few decades in the 16th century, long enough for Isa Khan to build himself this beautiful mausoleum and mosque. Although fairly well-preserved, the structures are missing many of the colourful tiles that once decorated much of the exterior. The octagonal mausoleum is quite similar to some of the Sayyid-period structures found at Lodi Gardens.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • MM212's Profile Photo

    Humayun's Tomb

    by MM212 Updated May 25, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Humayun's Tomb - Feb 2009
    4 more images

    Delhi's most beautiful monument is this grand mausoleum for the second Mughal Emperor Humayun and his family. It was built in 1565 by his Persian wife Haji Begum after his death. She employed the Persian architect, Mirak Mirza Ghiyas, who created the Empire's first great monumental Mughal mausoleum. His design - an elaborate square structure topped by a bulbous dome and standing over a raised platform in the centre of a spacious square garden with a charbagh layout - became the standard for numerous later-period Mughal mausoleums, which culminated with the construction of the Taj Mahal in Agra. Humayun's Tomb was added to the list of World Heritage Sites by the UNESCO in 1993.

    For more photos of this magnificent monument, check out my travelogue: "Humayun's Tomb".

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • MM212's Profile Photo

    Asfarwala Tomb & Mosque

    by MM212 Updated May 25, 2010
    Decorative medallion in Asfarwala Mosque - Feb 09
    3 more images

    Yet another funerary complex within Humayun's Tomb complex, Asfarwala contains an octagonal, domed mausoleum and a small mosque, both within their own walled enclosure. The mausoleum known to have been built in 1567 AD by a government official under the Mughal Emperor, Akbar the Great, but the exact name of the person is unknown. The adjacent mosque predates the mausoleum by 25 years.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • MM212's Profile Photo

    Arab Serai

    by MM212 Updated May 24, 2010
    Arab Serai Gate - Feb 2009
    2 more images

    Built in 1561 by Haji Begum, the widow of Sultan Humayun, next to her late husband's mausoleum, the Arab Serai is believed to have hosted Arab priests she brought back from her pilgrimage to Mecca. Other historians believe that it was used to house the Persian artisans who worked on Humayun's Tomb. Was it perhaps both? Little of the actual Arab Serai is left, but its monumental gate is fairly well preserved (seen in the attached photos).

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • MM212's Profile Photo

    Nai ka Gumbad (Barber's Tomb)

    by MM212 Updated May 24, 2010
    Barber's Tomb - Feb 09
    2 more images

    Completed in 1591 AD, this mausoleum is known as the Barber's Tomb (Nai ka Gumbad in Hindi) and is located on the grounds of Humayun's Tomb. Although the true identity of the person buried within is unknown, it is commonly thought to belong to the barber of Humayun, the Mughal Sultan. The Barber's Tomb is a square structure constructed with red sandstone and topped by a flat central dome.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • MM212's Profile Photo

    Humayun's Tomb - Interior

    by MM212 Updated May 22, 2010
    Humayun's sarcophagus - Feb 09
    3 more images

    The interior of Humayun's Tomb consists of a domed central chamber, surrounded by eight vaulted chambers. The central chamber, where the Emperor's sarcophagus lies, has four entrances, each accessed through a lofty iwan (half dome portico). The sarcophagi of members of the Emperor's family, along with a few later-period Emperors, are located in the surrounding chambers.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • MM212's Profile Photo

    Humayun's Tomb - Western Gate

    by MM212 Written May 22, 2010
    Western Gate, Humayun's Tomb - Feb 09
    2 more images

    A monument in itself, the Western Gate of the Humayun complex is nowadays its main entrance. Originally, however, it was secondary to the larger Southern Gate, which is now closed. The Western Gate follows the same architectural lines as the mausoleum, built from red sandstone and decorated with white marble.

    Related to:
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Delhi

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

67 travelers online now

Comments

Hotels Near Humayun Tomb
2.5 out of 5 stars
25 Opinions
0 miles away
3.0 out of 5 stars
54 Opinions
0.1 miles away
3.0 out of 5 stars
28 Opinions
0.1 miles away
Show Prices

View all Delhi hotels