India Gate, Delhi

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    India Gate
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    At India Gate
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    The National Monument: India Gate

    by Donna_in_India Written Oct 27, 2011

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    India Gate is a war memorial that commemorates the 90,000+ Indian soldiers that died in World War I. India Gate is at the eastern end of Rajpat facing - a long way down the road - Rashtrapati Bhavan, the official resident of the president of India.

    India Gate was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens and built in 1931. The red sandstone arch is 42m high and stands on a base of Bharatpur stone. It rises in stages and is a striking monument. It bears the name of thousands of British and Indian soldiers who lost their lives on the Northwest frontier and in the Afghan War of 1919.

    Under the arch is a memorial - Amar Jawan Jyoti - the tomb of the unknown soldier. And an eternal flame burns here in memory of the Indian soldiers who died in the Indo-Pakistan War of 1971.

    Facing India Gate is the empty sandstone canopy which once housed a statue of King George V (photo 3). The statue has been moved to Coronation Park.

    At night India Gate is illuminated by floodlights. But day or night you'll find couples and families hanging out or enjoying a snack from one of the vendors. The atmosphere did seem quite a contrast from the solemness of the memorial. Still, it's definitely a must see when in Delhi.

    India Gate At India Gate Eternal Flame and Empty Sandstone Canopy India Gate India Gate
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    Delhi, Old and New...

    by MM212 Updated Jun 13, 2010

    Since the construction of Lal Kot, the Rajput citadel in 1060, which later became the Moslem capital of Qutb al-Din Aibak, Delhi has been built and rebuilt eight times, each at a different location within the vast modern city that it is today. Many of these former iterations have perished, but have survived only in the form of a ruined fortress or a religious complex, such as Tughlaqabad Fort or Qutb Minar, respectively. Others, however, are now thriving neighbourhoods of the city, such as Shahjahanabad, which is nowadays referred to as Old Delhi, the area around the Red Fort. The final iteration of the city was built in the early 20th century under British Rule as the capital of the Raj, named New Delhi. This new city, with spacious streets and British-influenced architecture, was drawn out over the hills and fields between the seven older versions of the city, thus connecting all of them into one large metropolis, and was later made the capital of independent India. Crossing from orderly New Delhi into messy Old Delhi is similar to walking through the looking glass, worlds apart. With a clear delineation between the two, this Delhi page focuses on all of the historic monuments that are located outside New Delhi. For the rest, such as the Tomb of Safdarjung or Lodi Gardens, please refer to my New Delhi page.

    India Gate in New Delhi

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    India Gate

    by RAJASTHANBYCAR Updated Apr 23, 2009

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    India Gate is a war memorial , it is a majestic high arch 42 meters high, was built in honour of 90,000 Indian soldiers who lost their lives in World War First.Below it burns the Amar Jawan Jyoti, the eternal flame in tribute to all martyred soldiers of India. From the base of the arch one can get a good view of the Rashtrapati Bhavan.

    Amar Jawan Joyti Details India Gate India Gate Night View
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    Amar Jawan Jyoti

    by Rupanworld Written Jan 17, 2009

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    There is a shrine burning under the arch of India Gate since 1971. It is the Amar Jawan Jyoti (the flame of the immortal warrior), signifying the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. It is a black marble cenotaph placed on an edifice with a rifle placed on its barrel, crested by a soldier's helmet. At four corners of the edifice, there are four torches that are perpetually kept burning. It was unveiled on Republic day of India, January 26, 1972 by the then Prime Minister of India Indira Gandhi, closely after the 1971 India Pakistan War. Even today, during national ceremonies, homage is paid at this site by the President, Prime Minister or high officials.

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    India Gate

    by Rupanworld Written Jan 17, 2009

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    The India Gate is situated at one end of the Rajpath avenue that leads straight to the Presidential palace. It is a Gate in honour of all Indian soldiers of the British Indian army who died during the Afghan wars and World War I. The pathway through it has a rifle placed on its barrel, crested by a soldier's helmet, depicting the tribute to a dead soldier. The area is very touristy with loads of tourists visiting it every day. There is a beautiful grassy lawn on both sides of the little road approaching the India gate, a nice place to relax.

    Group of school children posing for a photo

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  • A Walk Around India Gate and the Secretariats

    by Stubbsn Written Nov 25, 2008

    Sometimes the hustle and grime of the city gets too much. A nice, relaxing walk around New Delhi can be just the thing. Get a tuc-tuc to India Gate and join the local and foreign tourists enjoying the sun in one of the green places in Delhi.

    As soon as we got out of the vehicle, we fell in step with three local school boys, out on a field-trip. Out of the blue, one asked me to take a picture of him. By the time I'd raised the camera to my eye, he was joined by what seemed like the whole of his school, waving and cheering - a group of 30 lads beaming smiles into the lens of this big, bald, white foreigner - one of the most memorable parts of my holiday.

    As we walked around the monument, we were approached by a number of Indians holding their cameras - not for us to take a picture of their group for them but so they could have their picture taken with us! I don't think they were confusing us with anyone famous - I mean we don't look (much) like Brad and Angelina - it was just an expression of the friendliness and lack of inhibitions Indian people have.

    Anyway, from the Gate, walk along the road-side park south to the Secretariat taking care not to step on the picnickers and get hit by a ball from the inpromptu games of cricket. On your left is the National Museum. At the end of the road are the Secretariats of, I think, the Defence Ministry and Home Affairs and the Presidential residence. A very grand mixture of european and indian arctitecture, once symbolising the rule of the Raj but now the greatness of India. Four columns topped by sailing boats represent the British dominions of South Africa, Australia etc. and look down upon the sentry guards drawn from the police and army, smartly attired in white putties and, in the case of the Sikh soldiers, splendid purple turbans.

    Lie in the small but perfectly manicured garden at the foot of the Secretariat building and doze-off sleepily in the shade of the tree for you are soon going to have to brave the Delhi traffic again.....

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    India Gate, Delhi

    by chizz Updated Jul 23, 2008

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    India Gate was built in 1931 in memory of the 90,000 Indian soldiers who died in World War I, whose names are inscribed in the gate. In 1971, a flame was lit in memory of the unknown soldiers who died in the 1970 Indo Pak War. It is lit up at night. During the day, especially on weekends you will find many families in the area playing cricket, having a picnic or hiring a rowing boat on the lake.
    There are many ice cream, food and drink sellers in the area. No charge to see the gate.

    India gate, Delhi Corn seller by India Gate Mobile telephone stand by India Gate Candy floss seller by India Gate

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    India Gate at dusk

    by PeteG Written Dec 6, 2007

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    Go to India Gate just as the sun starts to set. The arch is illuminated and it looks spectacular.

    The gate is engraved with the names of the soldiers from the Indian and British army who died in the Afghan Wars and 1st World War.

    A recent addition to it is the flames that are alight at the base which mark the end of the Indian and Pakistan war.

    India Gate
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    Best at sunset

    by PierreZA Updated Nov 4, 2007

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    When you visit India Gate, try to do it at sunset. It is very lively, with many families enjoying a almost festive atmosphere. Close by is a Park, mostly for families, which seems very popular. You can buy a variety of foods etc.
    This monument stands at the eastern end of the Rajpath. It is a war memorial with many thousands names of Indian Army soldiers (WWI).
    India Gate was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens and completed in 1931.

    India Gate at sunset
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    India Gate

    by Willettsworld Written Apr 9, 2007

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    Built in 1931 and designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens, this 42 m high stone arch of victory, universally known as India Gate, stands at the eastern end of Rajpath and is one of the symbols of India. It was previously officially known as the All India War Memorial. The names of the 90,000 Indian Army soldiers who died in the First World War, Afghan campaign of 1919 and the North-West Frontier operations are inscribed on the walls of this grand structure. An enternal flame burns in memory of the soldiers who died in the 1971 India-Pakistan War.

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    Boat Club

    by RAJASTHANBYCAR Updated Feb 28, 2007

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    India Gate a fascinating and wonderful monument. Enjoy the lush green lawns of India Gate, which house the famous boat club and a children's park. The lawns come alive in the evening with picnicking families and couples taking a stroll. Little children run about playing with balloons and eating ice-creams purchased from nearby vendors. The use of special lighting means that the monument looks even more striking at night than it does by day.

    Boat Club India Gate Rajpath
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    A memorial to the fallen soldiers

    by husain Updated Dec 24, 2006

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    India gate, a memorial to the fallen soldiers from the British Indian army, that died in battle, fighting for the British Empire during World War 1 and also the Afghan wars
    The foundation stone was laid in 1921 by the Duke of Connaught.
    The words - "To the dead of the Indian armies who fell honoured in France and Flanders Mesopotamia and Persia East Africa Gallipoli and elsewhere in the near and the far-east and in sacred memory also of those whose names are recorded and who fell in India or the north-west frontier and during the Third Afgan War" are inscribed at the top of the monument...
    India gate is the centre of 'Lutyens Delhi'. Edwin Lutyens was commissioned by the British to design an `imperial capital', ironically India became independent almost as soon as it was finished.

    the view at dusk... ceremony... Rajpath/ India Gate India Gate Inscription close up
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    The parksite of the Delhi Gate

    by tremendopunto Updated Sep 4, 2006

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    The India Gate is situated in New Delhi, a park-like area, circled by the central main roads. I went there on my first day in Delhi, waiting for my travel mate to arrive in the late evening. The street crossings really are a slaughter house here, not easy to get to the India Gate. I had crossed one of those 6-laned city roads, when I suddenly heard a loud break-noise of the blocked car tires, while turning around from a distance of maybe 100m I heard a loud crash - when I finally saw what was going on, there was a man flying over the streets, because of the car hit. He got up in his shock for one second, collapsing immediately again on the street asphalt. The driver just drew him on the side of the street, where people looked for the badly hurt person - just to go back into his car and carrying on with his ride as if nothing had happened..................now that really left a bad taste in my mouth, looking twice before doing any movement in the Delhi traffic.

    The India Gate dogs take a rest in the park of India Gate

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    A Family Area

    by keeweechic Written Jul 30, 2006

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    The area surrounding the India Gate is a gathering place for families and couples to enjoy the park like surrounds and have picnics. There are plenty of food stalls around as well as a large fountain with small lake with boats for hire. The fountain is lit up at night time.

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    The Royal Canopy

    by keeweechic Written Jul 30, 2006

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    The sandstone canopy facing the India Gate used to hold a statue of King George V which was put there in 1936. The statue was removed and placed in Coronation Park probably because that was the site where George, who was proclaimed King Emperor of India in 1911. The canopy which was also designed by Lutyens now stands empty.

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