Jami Masjid, Delhi

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    Jama Masjid mosque.
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  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    Broad Stairs

    by keeweechic Written Jul 23, 2006

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    There is a broad flights of steps which lead up to the impressive gateways in the north and the south. In the heat of the day, this seems to be a popular place to sleep or at least rest. Ustad Khalil was the architect of the mosque. He was a great sculpture during his time.

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    "A View of the World"

    by keeweechic Written Jul 23, 2006

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    The name Masjid-i-Jahan Numa means “The mosque commanding a view of the world”. That might have almost been the case even back then being elevated high above the surrounding bustling congested streets.

    The design of Jama Masjid is very similar to the smaller and less imposing Moti Masjid in Agra and faces the west.

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    Minarets

    by keeweechic Written Jul 23, 2006

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    Soaring 40 metre high minarets can be seen from afar standing at each end of the façade of the mosque. There are 130 steps winding their way up the inside. Like the large roof domes, the smaller domes on the minarets also have stripes on the outside.

    At the back of the mosque there are also four small minarets with crowns like the bigger ones.

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    White Domes

    by keeweechic Written Jul 23, 2006

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    Three large bulbous white domes act as a cover over the mosque and these are decorated with thin vertical black stripes with a gold covering on the very top. Under these domes is a hall with seven arched entrances. These entrances face the west. Beyond these entrances are the prayer

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    Jama Masjid (1656)

    by RAJASTHANBYCAR Updated Jan 13, 2005

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    Jama Masjid Gate
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    Jama Masjid - One of the Architectural gift given by Shah Jahan, Jama Masjid is one of the largest mosques not only in Delhi but in India. Completed in 1658 this Mosque has three gateways, Four angle towers and two 40 m high minarets. You can enter the mosque but take precaution to take off your shoes and make sure that you are properly dressed before entering. One can also go to the top of minarets. From here you can have a birds eye view of Delhi.
    Entrans Free Camera Rs 150

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    JAMI MASJID

    by claree Written Aug 12, 2008

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    The Masjid-i-Jahan Numa, commonly known as the Jama Masjid of Delhi, is the principal mosque of Old Delhi in India. Commissioned by the Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan, builder of the Taj Mahal, and completed in the year 1656 AD, it is one of the largest and best-known mosques in India. It is also at the beginning of a very busy and popular street/center in Old Delhi, Chandni Chowk.

    Masjid-i-Jahan Numa means "the mosque commanding a view of the world", and the name Jama Masjid is a reference to the weekly congregation observed on Friday (the yaum al-jum`a) at the mosque. The courtyard of the mosque can hold up to twenty-five thousand worshippers. The mosque also houses several relics in a closet in the north gate, including a copy of the Qur'an written on deer skin.

    The courtyard of the mosque can be reached from the east, north and south by three flights of steps, all built of red sandstone. The northern gate of the mosque has 39 steps. The southern side of the mosque has 33 steps. The eastern gate of the mosque was the royal entrance and it has 35 steps. These steps used to house food stalls, shops and street entertainers. In the evening, the eastern side of the mosque used to be converted into a bazaar for poultry and birds in general. Prior to the 1857 War of Indian Independence, there was a madrassah near the southern side of the mosque, which was pulled down after the mutiny.

    The mosque faces west. Its three sides are covered with open arched colonnades, each having a lofty tower-like gateway in the centre. The mosque is about 261 feet (80 m) long and 90 feet (27 m) wide, and its roof is covered with three domes with alternate stripes of black and white marble, with its topmost parts covered with gold. Two lofty minarets, 130 feet (41 m) high, and containing 130 steps, longitudinally striped with white marble and red sandstone, flank the domes on either side. The minarets are divided by three projecting galleries and are surmounted by open twelve-sided domed pavilions. On the back of the mosque, there are four small minarets crowned like those in the front.
    nder the domes of the mosque, is a hall with seven arched entrances facing the west and the walls of the mosque, up to the height of the waist, are covered with marble. Beyond this is a prayer hall, which is about 61 meters X 27.5 meters, with eleven arched entrances, of which the centre arch is wide and lofty, and in the form of a massive gateway, with slim minarets in each corner, with the usual octagonal pavilion surmounting it. Over these arched entrances there are tablets of white marble, four feet (1.2 m) long and 2.5 feet (760 mm) wide, inlaid with inscriptions in black marble. These inscriptions give the history of the building of the mosque, and glorify the reign and virtues of Shah Jahan. The slab over the centre arch contains simply the words "The Guide!"

    The mosque stands on a platform of about five feet (1.5 m) from the pavement of the terrace, and three flight of steps lead to the interior of the mosque from the east, north, and the south. The floor of the mosque is covered with white and black marble ornamented to imitate the Muslim prayer mat; a thin black marble border is marked for the worshippers, which is three feet long and 1 ½ feet wide. In total there are 899 such spaces marked in the floor of the mosque. The back of the mosque is cased over to the height of the rock on which the mosque stands with large hewn stones.

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    Jama Masjid, Delhi

    by chizz Updated Jul 21, 2008

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    Jama Masjid, Delhi
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    This mosque was constructed by Shah Jahan and is one of the largest mosques in the country. It has 4 towers and two 40m monuments which give a great view of the city. Dress conservatively with covered shoulders and knees. Sarongs can be hired for 50 rupees if you forget. Leave your shoes at the entrance for 10 rupees or carry them with you. Entrance is free but a camera charge of 200 rupees is applicable. Non Muslims can enter the mosque from 8am until 30 mins before sunset. There is an extra small charge for going up the tower of the mosque.

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  • tremendopunto's Profile Photo

    The beautiful Jama Masjid - the great Mosque

    by tremendopunto Updated Sep 3, 2006

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    The Jama Masjid is a magnificent mosque, situated in the heart of Old Delhi. It is supposed to be the biggest mosque in India offering an incredible architecture of a mix of red sandstone and white marble. You can climb up a minarett to have a beautiful, maybe the best 360-degrees view over Old Delhi!

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    Jama Masjid

    by Rupanworld Written Jan 27, 2009

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    The Jama Masjid (also called the Masjid-I-Jahanuma or the 'mosque commanding view of the world') of Delhi, built by the Mughal emperor and architectural genius Shah Jahan in 1656 in his walled capital of Shahjahanabad, is the largest and most well known mosque in India. The design of the mosque is similar to many other mosques built by Shah Jahan but the beauty of it lies in the hugeness of the structure and at the same time the alternating stripes of red sandstone and white marble, makes it exceptionally beautiful and architecturally, a thing of wonder. The courtyard is built of red sandstone and there are three different set of stairs in three directions by which you can reach it. The complex outside the main mosque houses thoudands of temporary stalls selling articles starting from toys to blankets during the day time and quite impliedly the area is quite crowded. Inside the mosque, there are certain things to watch, like the Quran written on deer skin, a red beard-hair of Prophet Mohammad, his sandals and his footprint in a marble slab. The mosque was designed by Mughal architect Ostad Khalil and costed a very high amount of Rs. 10 crores, a huge figure for the 17th century. People of all religions are allowed to enter the mosque except during the prayer times and must take off shoes before entering.

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    Jama Masjid

    by Willettsworld Updated Mar 14, 2007

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    The Jama Masjid (or to give it its proper name, the Masjid-i-Jahan Numa meaning "the mosque commanding a view of the world"), is Old Delhi’s main mosque. It was built between 1644 and 1656 for Emperor Shah Jahan of Taj Mahal fame and is one of India’s largest. The mosque is about 261 feet (80 m) long and 90 feet (27 m) wide, and its roof is covered with three domes with alternate stripes of black and white marble, with its topmost parts covered with gold. Two minarets, 130 feet (40 m) high and containing 130 steps, flank the domes on either side.

    For me, the mosque was my first tourist sight on my 4-month tour around India so it was particularly interesting. My rickshaw driver dropped me off at the southern entrance and I entered through a security bag check and climbed up the large, wide set of steps and entered into the large courtyard through a gatehouse where I was asked by a chap sitting on a chair for a Rs200 entrance fee which I paid not knowing any better till later when I realised that its actually free to enter. So please bear this in mind. I got conned visiting my first Indian tourist sight! After taking a few photo’s, I sat on the edge of the courtyard to take it all in and watch the general goings on before climbing up the left minaret.

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    Jama Masjid

    by the_mostly_harmless Updated Dec 8, 2007

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    Crowded way leading to Jama Masjid
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    We took a rickshaw for the crowded way leading to Jama Masjid. All the shops and people around and the Jama Masjid in front - nice sight.
    We didn't paid an entrance fee. I don't know if this is the rule or they don't take entrance fee from muslims, because the guy at the front door asked us whether we want to pray or not.
    Anyway, you will have to pay 150 Rs to make photos inside.

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    JAMA MASJID

    by undisputed Updated Mar 3, 2005

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    Shahjahan built this mosque in 1658. Situated near the red fort in old Delhi, Jama Masjid is the largest mosque in India with a seating capacity of more than 20,000 people. This mosque with bulbous domes and tapering minarets those were built with marble and slate is an architectural beauty

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  • pfsmalo's Profile Photo

    Jama Masjid, Delhi.

    by pfsmalo Written May 29, 2014

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    Jama Masjid mosque.
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    The Jama Masjid is the largest mosque in India holding up to 25.000 persons. Built around 1650 there are two minarets and three large bulbous domes. When we were walking around the mosque it was prayer time so we weren't allowed in by the numerous police and army presence at the gates. Very close to Chandni Chowk bazaar and the Red Fort the nearest metro is Chawri market.

    Entrance is free, even for non-Muslims but photography costs 200 INR.

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    Jama Masjid:largest Mosque of India

    by vinod-bhojak Written Dec 12, 2013

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    Jama Masjid of Delhi
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    This great mosque of Old Delhi is the largest in India, with a courtyard capable of holding 25,000 devotees. It was begun in 1644 and ended up being the final architectural extravagance of Shah Jahan, the Mughal emperor who built the Taj Mahal and the Red Fort.Shah Jahan built several important mosques in Delhi, Agra, Ajmer and Lahore. The Jama Masjid's floor plan is very similar to the Jama Masjid, Fatehpur Sikri near Agra, but the Jama Masjid in Delhi is the bigger and more imposing of the two. Its Badshahi Mosque of Lahore built by Shah Jahan's son Aurangzeb in 1673 is closely related to the Jama Masjid at Raipur
    The highly decorative mosque has three great gates, four towers and two 40 m-high minarets constructed of strips of red sandstone and The mosque also houses several relics in a closet in the north gate, including an antique copy of the Qur'an written on deer skin

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  • zumodemango's Profile Photo

    JAMI MASJID.Visit the biggest...

    by zumodemango Updated Oct 31, 2004

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    JAMI MASJID.Visit the biggest mosque in India. Its name is Jami Masjid. It's really big, you can see in the picture that the minars aren't straigh because of the image effect. The walls and korans are really beautiful!

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