Red Fort, Delhi

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  • Public Audience Hall. (Diwan-I-Am)
    Public Audience Hall. (Diwan-I-Am)
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  • Red Fort
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  • Private Audience Hall (Diwan-I-Khas).
    Private Audience Hall (Diwan-I-Khas).
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  • ukirsari's Profile Photo

    Lal Qila

    by ukirsari Updated Aug 23, 2004

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    Lal Qila [sometimes pronounced as 'Quila'] is taken from Urdu, means Red Fort. The red sanstones castle which remains the gorgeous Mughal emperor Shah Jahan.
    Built in 1639 and finished about 1648. And Mughal power lead from this place 'till 1857, when Bahadur Shah Zafar exiled.
    Several features inside;
    ~ Moti Masjid added by Emperor Aurangzeb, 1659
    ~ Diwan-i-Khas, the legendary Peacock Throne
    ~ Diwan-i-Aam, 60 pillared hall
    ~ Khas Mahal, the royal apartments, facing to Yamuna River
    ~ Rang Mahal, with marble fountain

    Lal Qila of Delhi (c) ukirsari
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    Red Fort (Chatta Chowk)

    by diageva Updated Jul 25, 2004

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    Once you entrance to the Red Fort you will get through a long street, a covered gallery full of souvenir, photograph, jewel ... shops. Here I bought a new memory stick for my sony camera ( 4540 R. 560MB). Be prepared for thousands of pic at this imperial city.
    Here things are much more expensive than outside :))
    In old times here use to be the best Delhi's craftsmen

    Chatta Chowk

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    Red Fort (Lahore Gate)

    by diageva Updated Jul 25, 2004

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    The beautiful entrance to Red Fort has lots of importance for India, here is the place where the Indian flag was hoisted for first time when India get its independence in 1947.

    Like other Indian Monuments, Red Fort is not a Monument but a group of Monuments, palaces, a imperial city protected by gorgeous red walls.

    Tourist Entrance 100 R.

    Red Fort

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    Red Fort (Diwan-I Amm)

    by diageva Written Jul 25, 2004

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    After Chatta Chowk, you will walk through a patio and get to an expectacual place, a large pavilion for imperial audiences. In the centre of the Imperial City, after it all the private parts of the fortress. All of red sandstone full of columns. In the centre, the marble white throne.
    The light here is incredible.

    Diwan-I Amm

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    Lahore Gate

    by ukirsari Updated Sep 1, 2004

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    The main entrance to Lal Qila [the Red Fort]. Also the place where the Prime Minister of India proclaimed the Independence Day, August 15, 1947 [2 years - 2 days after my own country's Independence Day: 17-08-1945] .
    Named based the location which is directly facing to Lahore, Pakistan.

    Lahore Gate (c) ukirsari
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    RED FORT

    by zumodemango Updated Nov 1, 2004

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    Last time, 3 years ago, i was in Delhi on the 15th of August so we couln't visit the Red Fort inside.
    Impressed because it's very big, almost 2 km, the walls are very big giving the impression of a hard fort. It was build following the model of Agra. In spite of the sackings.

    Red Fort

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    Red Fort (Naubhat Khana)

    by diageva Updated Jul 25, 2004

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    Walking from the commercial gallery you will get to a 3 floor building, of a really beautiful red facade, where musicians used to live and play ceremonial music or announcing the arrival or exit of important guests. Here also was the place from where guest had to leave their elephants or other transport and go on walking inside the city.
    Look at its facade near. Beautiful indeed

    Naqqar Khana

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    The masterpiece of the Great Mogul

    by kokoryko Updated Mar 10, 2008

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    The Red Fort , like Chandni Chowk, in another register is an emblematic place of Delhi; missing a visit to the Red For is like not having been to Delhi! Since I am a kid, am able to read stories, I was fascinated by the Great Mogul. Moguls disappeared but some of their works and achievements are still on this planet. I am as competent in architecture and Islamic art as a dog for biking, but I discovered Islamic long time ago in Algeria, in Andalusia, later in south East Asia, and more recently in Central Asia; it is every time a discovery! And here, in Lal Qila, it is so new to me, and different, this Mogul art, so much majesty! I had visited the Red Fort a few years ago, my camera did not work, and revisiting this marvel was just giving me an idea of what paradise on Earth (for the Moguls at least!) could be!
    The Red Fort has been constructed by Shah Jahan, great great great grandson of Timur of Samarqand in 1639; he built a 2.5 km long wall around his palace. What we see today is a very small part of what existed in times of splendour, as during the British rule, it was used as an army cantonment and it is estimated that the four fifth of the palace have been destroyed. . . . . the fate of those who loose. . . . . Long walls and gates; Lahore gate(on the two first pictures) is the most impressive, and it is there where most visitors enter. Picture 3 shows it as seen from the minaret of Jama Mosque. At Lahore Gate, you can have a look at the high walls and the ditches (picture 4).
    Be prepared for a security check when entering the fort: you will pass under a detection device and be searched on the body; this explains the queues at the entrance (picture 5).
    Entrance fees: 150 Rs, (10Rs for Indian citizen); about the fees, I was witness of really stupid appalling behaviour of some “tourists”; a couple looking like Indian queued at the local tickets shelter, but were then asked to pay the foreigner fee, and they made almost a scandal about the fees they had to pay! They were in fact irked, not having managed to save. . . (3.7 – 0.25) 3.5 U.S.$. Hell ! ! What are 3.5 Dollars when you can afford to travel overseas. . .? And this money is used (well, in theory!) for maintenance and renovation of the historical place, for the Archaeological Survey, or in the government expenses for “development” of India! Stupid games. . . . .

    Ticket to the Fort gives entrance to all museums or buildings in the Red Fort.
    Open: 10 a m -- 6 p m
    The Archeological Survey of India gives historical and construction information about the Red Fort and the little palaces inside (click on the links).

    Arrivibg at Lahore Gate Lahore Gate Lahore Gate seen from the minaret of Jama Masjid Walls and ditch Security check
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    Red Fort

    by Folbi Updated Mar 12, 2005

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    Nice from outside. I can't confirm the inside was worth the visit as I had to renounce to it due to some VIP movements.

    We took a cycle rickshaw to spend the time we had planned to allocate to the visit of the red fort.. The photo is blurry as i took it from the rickshaw in full motion...

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    Lal Qil'ah: The Red Fort

    by illumina Updated Feb 20, 2010

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    The Red Fort, situated in Old Delhi, was built between 1638-48 by the Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan, the builder of the Taj Mahal, as a royal residence in his new capital, Shahjahanabad. It was used as the Mughal capital until 1857 when Bahadur Shah Zafar was exiled by the British following the Mutiny / War of Indepence. It was then a British miliary camp until Independence in 1947, when the Indian Army took over the fort as a military garrison. They vacated it in 2003 to facilitate restoration work. It is now a UNESCO World Heritage site.

    The entry fee for western tourists was 250r in Feb 2009

    The main entrance is the Lahore Gate (2nd photo), which leads through the Chatta Chowk, a covered bazaar street.

    For the buildings within the Fort, see following tips.

    Red Fort Lahore Gate Kites over the Red Fort
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    And here you meet the Great Mogul. . .

    by kokoryko Written Mar 10, 2008

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    From far Diwan I Am is not very impressive (Picture 3); only one storey, surrounded by arcades with typical mogul arches, but when you arrive, the arcades are in every direction, you are in a geometrical pillar forest, and the long alleys with the cusped arches and the double pillars have a beautiful perspective (picture 2), and arriving where the Mogul awaits you on his marble throne (the Kursi, main picture), you cannot do else than admiring, (despite the throne is protected by a net from birds and. . . tourists). If you have an audience with the Great Mogul, take your time and walk under the arcades and look at the perspectives and the fine mogul style cusped arches before meeting him at the throne.

    Entrance fees: 150 Rs, (10Rs for Indian citizen).
    Ticket to the Fort gives entrance to all museums or buildings in the Red Fort.
    Open: 10 a m -- 6 p m

    The Archeological Survey of India gives historical and construction information about the Red Fort and the little palaces inside (click on the links).

    The Kursi (the marble throne) Pillars, arches, perspectives. . . View from Naqqar Khana Another perspective Cuspate arches
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    Naqqar Khana and Military Museum

    by kokoryko Written Mar 10, 2008

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    Naqqar Khana is also called Hathipol, meaning it was the place where visitors dismounted from the elephants. . . . must have been impressive to see important people and their escort arriving on elephants here. . . . Recent studies of the flowers (Main picture, pictures 4 and 5)carved on the walls revealed they were once covered with gold. . . . I only try to imagine. . . The main and last pictures show the exquisite carvings in the red sandstone, and even without gold they are so beautiful.

    The entrance ticket to the Red Fort allows you to visit the three museums which are inside the perimeter of the Fort. Militaries, weapons, uniforms are not exactly my cup of tea, but after visiting the palaces and marvels, my curiosity could not leave me without having a look! But I was more impressed by the carvings on the red sandstone like on the main picture; there are signs indicating where to enter this museum, on the eastern side of Chatta chowk, walk up the stairs and enter the museum; there are a few rooms where you will find, in more or less chronological order, weapons, from all sorts of swords - beautiful examples of what local blacksmiths created- to rifles or machine guns – beginning of mass death technology (picture 2)- passing in front of the famous Jodhpur pants, pride of the British colonial army (picture 3), paints, displays of battlefields; a few explanations in the show windows. . . . When I walked out, I was happy to see again the flowers of Naqqar Khana . . . .

    It is a small museum, but interested people may find a lot of examples of Indian and British colonial military items and how they were used.

    Entrance fees: 150 Rs, (10Rs for Indian citizen).
    Ticket to the Fort gives entrance to all museums or buildings in the Red Fort.
    Open: 10 a m -- 6 p m

    The Archeological Survey of India gives historical and construction information about the Red Fort and the little palaces inside (click on the links).

    A beautiful sandstone flower Death machine The famous Jodhpur pant, pride of the British army Another sandstone flower Wonderful carving work!
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    Indian War Memorial Museum

    by kokoryko Written Mar 10, 2008

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    Before leaving the Red Fort through Lahore Gate, take an alley to the North (right when you go out), follow the signs leading to the Indian War memorial Museum. A visit there can be moving, and, well, with a bit exacerbate nationalism, it tells about the resistance of Indian against the colonial forces and the struggle for independence. There are no real pieces of art, paintings and sculptures a bit too “nationalist-realistic”, but there are also quotes of great Indian people, and it gives historical perspective to what we (me, at least) only know out of context and a bit from “far”.
    There are of course evocations of the massacre of Amritsar, evocations of battles, and lots of statues of Indian heroes and politicians; when the visit finishes of course, the chains are broken (picture4), and Gandhi (but also Nehru) are well shown; I learned there were an amazing number of parties, legalist or not who fought for independence or autonomy, not only the Congress, by far. . . !

    Entrance fees: 150 Rs, (10Rs for Indian citizen).
    Ticket to the Fort gives entrance to all museums or buildings in the Red Fort.
    Open: 10 a m -- 6 p m

    The Archeological Survey of India gives historical and construction information about the Red Fort and the little palaces inside (click on the links).

    The spirit of this museum Paint Paints, stauties, souvenir weapons. . . Breaking the chains
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    Khas Mahal and the scale of justice

    by kokoryko Written Mar 10, 2008

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    Here are the private apartments of the Great Mogul, where he slept, welcomed his close friends, and took some time to think about his empire. White marble, I almost would write “as usual”, well, white marble, engravings, beautifully carved ceilings, (all pavilions of the Red Fort are more or less in the same style, but all have really their own personality!), and decoration subjects. . . . This scale on the screen of a door, on the moon, above the clouds, with the stars. . . . it is not exactly modest but is really a sumptuous work of art. You cannot stop looking at the ceilings, beautifully inlaid, but also the walls, niches, windows with their grids (picture3), and the Mogul also liked western sculpture as this chapiter and pillar suggest. It is not possible to go inside the pavilion, but there is so much that catches the eye, . . . and I show again (last picture) the scale in its general setting: the Mogul had a good taste.

    Entrance fees: 150 Rs, (10Rs for Indian citizen).
    Ticket to the Fort gives entrance to all museums or buildings in the Red Fort.
    Open: 10 a m -- 6 p m

    The Archeological Survey of India gives historical and construction information about the Red Fort and the little palaces inside (click on the links).

    The scale of justice Ceiling in Khas Mahal All is beautiful: arches, ceiling, doors, walls. . Chapiter The scale of justice from the other side.
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    Diwan-i-Khas

    by illumina Written Jan 23, 2010

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    The Diwan-i-Khas, or Hall of Private Audiences, is where the Emperor held private meetings. This hall is made of marble, and has arches pierced through all four walls. Inside, the pillars are decorated with delicate floral carving and inlays.

    Over the marble pedestal in its centre stood the famous Peacock Throne which was removed to Iran in 1739 by Nadir Shah. Through the centre of the hall ran the Nahr-i-Bihisht (Stream of Paradise) which connected all the private apartments of the fort.

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