New Delhi Off The Beaten Path

  • Daryagunj Book Bazar On Sunday
    Daryagunj Book Bazar On Sunday
    by kmohandas
  • A Book Vendor
    A Book Vendor
    by kmohandas
  • Books on Display
    Books on Display
    by kmohandas

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in New Delhi

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    On the road out of Delhi

    by georeiser Written May 18, 2010

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    On the road out of Delhi
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    The main road from Delhi to Agra take you through different landscapes from the hectic city and densely populated areas to the countryside where shepherds walk along the road. Many domestic animals cross the street and slow vehicles are driving in the middle of the road. The road are good with two lanes in each direction. But be careful with the pedestrians, rickshaws, bicycles and cows.

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    Day trips from Delhi

    by lynnehamman Written Apr 4, 2009

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    Dhaba on the way to Agra

    Because Delhi, with its international airport,is often the starting point for many travellers, it is the ideal city from which to take some side-trips to surrounding places of interest.
    So begin you Indian adventure here- you can visit places by car or train,and all within a few hours.
    Agra,Fatehpur Sikri, Jaipur, Haridwar, Rishikesh, are all within driving distance, and the drive will be anywhere between 2-5 hours. Trains run frequently- the Shatabi express is an excellent train, and moves many passengers to these destinations in a very short while.
    Hiring a car and driver is also a good option. This can usually be arranged through your hotel travel desk, or any travel agent. The cost is not too exhorbitant. We paid R5000 for two for a FULL DAY tour to Agra and Fatehpur Sikri,and the driver was excellent. (see my Agra page for details)
    Agra CAN be done in one day, providing you leave VERY early from Delhi (like 5am) and you may also fit in a quick stop at Fatepur Sikri. Haridwar is a 4 hour drive away.
    We enjoyed all the drives, as we did the train trips. One gets to see the rural countryside,and there are many Dhaba stops (tea-stops), where one can stop and have a break.

    Closer to Delhi- the Tuglakabad Fort Complex is worth a visit, as is the Qutb Minar complex.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel
    • Backpacking

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    Meditation zone

    by bashboo Written Aug 20, 2008

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    It might feature in some guide books, but in central delhi there is a gurduara Bangla Sahib. it is a temple for people of the sikh religion but anyone can go here at any time of day or night. at certain times you can witness the holy book being tucked into bed - there is no translation for this, sorry! and being brought back out in the morning, i think the timings for this are 11pm and 4am or something similar. go any time you like and just sit by the water reservoir, it is a lovely place to contemplate, meditate or just watch...

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel

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    Cheap cheap clothes...

    by bashboo Written Aug 20, 2008

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    If you have some time and if you have a knack for finding a bargain, then this place is just what you should do if you want to get some really good deals on clothes while you are in india. the kind of stuff you will find here will be mostly stuff that has not made it to our export houses or abroad for whatever reason, it could be that it was an excess order or that the pieces have small or even major faults, stitching out of place, a bit dirty, a hole or wrongly labelled. to get the best of this market you will need a LOT OF PATIENCE to riffle through piles and piles of clothes, pick your favourite, find any major faults with the item (sometimes tiny stickers are put on next to the faults)...then you should haggle with the shop keeper unless you picked up from a pre-marked jumble sale pile (there will be a hanging sign above it). take the item home/to your hotel, launder it and trust me, i go to this market very often, the stuff looks as if it were bought in any good shop.
    The market is called Sarojini Nagar market.

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  • kmohandas's Profile Photo

    DARYAGUNJ SUNDAY BOOK BAZAR

    by kmohandas Updated Jun 20, 2008

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    Daryagunj Book Bazar On Sunday
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    For book lovers and students, Daryaganj is the most favorite place to spend a Sunday. This biggest secondhand book market in the world starts at 10 AM every Sunday. This old book market is a paradise for book lovers and students. There will be varieties of rare books on all topics such as art, science, commerce, mathematics, cosmology, classics, literature, management, computers, latest and old novels etc. to name a few. The books are available here at very affordable prices, sometimes even at throw-away prices. You must bargain to get the books at affordable price.
    The books are displayed on the foot paths of Daryagunj area starting from Delhi Stock Exchange Building extending almost up to Red Fort over a stretch of 3 kilo-meters. Total books on display may be around 80,000 to 100,000. Over 80% of books displayed are in English. If you are a collector of old books, you may come across a few books published over a century ago which may be priced from INR 50/- to 100/-.
    Daryagunj is approachable by bus from almost any part of Delhi. Buses proceeding to Red Fort or Old Delhi Railway Station pass through Daryagunj. Bus Stop- Delhi Gate. Nearest Metro station- Pragati Maidan
    Many of my best collection of books are purchased from here. Please do visit this place on a Sunday when you are in Delhi.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Study Abroad
    • School Holidays

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  • typhoidmary's Profile Photo

    Colonial Britian, Indian Style

    by typhoidmary Written Jan 5, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I am not sure how possible it is for tourists to go here. Our Guide (Aisha), whose husband is a member, invited us to tea. It is very, very old school British, but refreshingly occupied by Indians (the folks who should have been members in the first place). I can not say the food was great, since it was generally British circa 1913, but it was an interesting experience and atmosphereic in the right way. If all else fails, I have Aisha's contact info, so if you have her as a guide she might invite you too

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

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  • josephescu's Profile Photo

    Crafts Museum

    by josephescu Written Aug 19, 2007

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    Crafts Museum, Delhi
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    Just opposite the Purana Quila (the Old Fort), there is a crafts museum, containing a collection of traditional stalls displaying various crafts such as textiles, woodwork, ceramics, statues of animals, puppets, masks, paintings, tribal objects, terracotta figures, raj-time vehicles, etc from various cultures and tribes. The open air traditional houses from all around the subcontinent make it an impressive village life exhibition, together with the craft demonstrations and artisans who sell directly to the buyer.

    There was non entrance fee, and we were allowed to make pictures in the courtyards.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

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  • Applelyn's Profile Photo

    Markets

    by Applelyn Written Jul 1, 2007

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    It is nice to go into the little pockets of stalls set up by the roadside. They tell you the local's favourites. There you will see another side of the country. I found what the locals' favourite food and why they loved it. As for Indians, most of them loved mint.

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    Post a letter

    by Applelyn Written Jul 1, 2007

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    I love to post a postcard back home whenever I travel. Every post office is different in different countries. In addition, stamps depict the country in a unique way. Visit New Delhi post office at Dak Bhavan. You can also visit India's National Philatelic Museum for free; Mon to Fri from 9:30am-4:30pm(closed 12:30-2:30pm).

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  • Gandhi Pilgrimage

    by Nprawira Written Jan 30, 2006
    The cremation site

    There's no need for an introduction to Gandhi anymore but details of his life may be missing from people's knowledge of him as an individual. To redress that, go to Rajghat, the site of Mahatma Gandhi's cremation where there is also a museum dedicated to the man himself. The short script inscribed on the black granite spells He Ram! or Oh God, allegedly, Gandhi's last words after being shot.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

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  • India Gate

    by Nprawira Written Jan 30, 2006

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    India Gate

    Placed at the eastern end of the 2 mile long Rajpath avenue, the India Gate is a reminiscence of Paris' Triump de Arc. It was built to commemorate the Indian and British soldiers who died in WW I and there's an eternal flame in memory of the soldiers who died in the 1971 India-Pakistan War. You can actually stop at the other end of the gate and take quick pictures of it on the middle of the road.

    Related to:
    • Architecture

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  • Lodi Gardens

    by Nprawira Written Jan 30, 2006

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    Athpula bridge

    Lodi Gardens is like an oasis in the middle of a desert. Most of the who's who of New Delhi spent their jogging and yoga hours in this beautifully landscaped garden. Its pathways are nicely lined with trees with subpathways leading to some tombs and a mosque. In the northern end of the garden is a pool and a stone bridge called Athpula or 8 piers that dates back to the 17th century.

    Related to:
    • Adventure Travel

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  • Purana Qila (III)

    by Nprawira Written Jan 30, 2006

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    Qilai Kuhna Mosque

    The only structure that is still in good condition is this well-proportioned Qila i Kuhna Mosque. Unexpectedly this picture captures that exact aspect down to the number of tips on top of the arches on both sides.

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces

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  • Purana Qila (II)

    by Nprawira Written Jan 30, 2006
    Sher Mandal

    Humayun tragically lost his life after missing his footing while hurrying down the steps of this library upon hearing the prayer call. Known as Sher Mandal, this rather small and dilapidated structure could be a surprise to some for an imperial library but do remember that literacy was a rare skill 450 years ago and getting a book wasn't as easy as click and pay.

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces

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  • Purana Qila (I)

    by Nprawira Updated Jan 30, 2006

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    One of the 3 gateways

    I visited Purana Qila since it is just a small distance from Humayun's tomb and also because I saw a picture of its imposing gateway that I thought worth seeing. Unfortunately by the time I arrived there, my memory of the gateway was a little blurred and what I saw was definitely not awe-inspiring. I should have known better that I entered from the wrong entrance so don't make the same mistake but enter from the Bara Darwaza gateway on the western wall. The interior of this site is actually in ruins and there's not much standing buildings left apart from a library and a mosque. Indeed, acrcheological excavation is still being conducted as there are tons of artefacts waiting to be unearthed.

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces

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