New Delhi Things to Do

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Most Recent Things to Do in New Delhi

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    Visit Lotus Temple - The Bahai House of Worship!!

    by udtaparindaa Updated Jun 9, 2014

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    just after sunset
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    To begin with I am not a spiritual person neither do I practice any religion although I am Hindu by birth. But I do crave for peace and the perfect place in Delhi to find some is Lotus Temple. This 30 year old structure constructed by the Bahai house of worshippers is open to all religions and is located very close to Delhi Metro.

    One should leave their footwear outside (free provision for their storage is available) and has to maintain pin drop silence once inside. It's up to one's wish on how long he wishes to stay inside and there are many including me who like to sit in silence for a longer period.

    If one is to believe the reports, it's said that Lotus temple is the most visited building in India surpassing even Taj Mahal. It also has the following recognition "The most visited religious building in the world" by Guinness World Records, 2001.

    Following are the timings of the temple:-
    Sunday: 9:30 am – 5:30 pm
    Monday: Closed
    Tuesday: 9:30 am – 5:30 pm
    Wednesday: 9:30 am – 5:30 pm
    Thursday: 9:30 am – 5:30 pm
    Friday: 9:30 am – 5:30 pm
    Saturday 9:30 am – 5:30 pm

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    Agrasen Ki Baoli - a Photographers's treat!!

    by udtaparindaa Written May 23, 2014

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    Another weekend came and I had this urge to visit some place in Delhi which is not so famous and yet holds some significant history. A little help from Google directed me and my roomie (who had recently bought a nice DSLR) to "Agrasen Ki Baoli" which is a protected monument by the Archeological Survey of India (ASI) under the Ancient Monuments and Archeological Sites and Remains Act of 1958.

    "Baoli" is a Hindi word which means "Well" and that's what this is, a stepped well which is 16 meters long and 15 meters wide. Such wells were made in ancient India to conserve water and also acted as reservoir. It was built by a wealthy merchant from Agrawal community during Tomar Dynasty.

    It is now inhabited by a huge flock of wild Pigeons as well as hell lot of bats who take shelter into the dark alleys of the lower/deeper sections of the well. We as beginners to DSLR (I have usually been a point and shoot fan so far) tried to get some good snaps but on reaching home we could see why it's so tough to use these DSLR's and so easy with Point and Shoot :P (no doubt DSLR's have their own big advantage too).

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    Gurudwara Bangla Sahib

    by udtaparindaa Updated May 21, 2014

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    The largest Gurudwara (Sikh house of worship) of Delhi is not only one of the important places for Sikhs but also a place to offer your prayers in silence (not during weekends though which sees a huge rush of devotees). The compound has a 'Sarovar' whose water is considered Holy by the Sikhs. The water is considered to have healing powers and is taken back by devotees with them even from far away places.

    The structure has a Golden Dome while the rest is made up of white marble which beholds you during the day and shines during the night. The night view from across the Sarovar is magnificent. Just outside the main entry one can see "Nishan Sahib" which is a Sikh holy triangular flag made of cotton or silk cloth, with a tassel at its end. The word, Nishan means symbol, and the flag is hoisted on a tall flagpole, outside most Gurdwaras.

    One would require to cover its head while inside the compound and enter the same only after washing their hands and legs for which free provision is made just outside the main entrance. There's a community kitchen which serves food to one and all for free (and believe me it's quite tasty). Anyone can take up volunteer work in Kitchen or for cleaning up the premises or shoe-minding (there's a counter which shall take care of your shoes while you offer your prayers inside and yes this service is free too).

    After offering prayers don't forget to take the "Prasad" (a material substance of food that is a religious offering and consumed by worshipers). The compound also has a small school and an Art Gallery.

    It is located about 1.3 kms from Connaught Place which is a prime location of interest in Delhi. For more information pls refer to the following link
    Bangla Sahib

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    Uttara Guruvayurappan Temple - A must visit

    by udtaparindaa Updated May 21, 2014
    The main entrance

    I had never known about it and how could I have after all there are thousands of gods in Hinduism but then to quote it in a more apt manner would be to say that God is supposed to have different forms in different times and ages. It is dedicated to Lord Krishna (an avatar of the god Vishnu).

    The main Guruvayrappan Temple is situated at Guruvayur in the Thrissur District of Kerala. This temple is one of the main Guruvayurappan temples situated on the eastern banks of Yamuna, Mayur Vihar, East Delhi, has been a major pilgrimage center and has been serving the residents of the capital city and the neighboring areas from its very inception in the year 1983. True to the age-old traditions of Hindu Temples, this Temple has not only promoted religious activities but also worked as a center to cater to the socio-cultural needs of the society. During its existence for over 25 Years, this abode of the Lord Guruvayurappan has worked for the betterment of all sections of the society through multifaceted activities.

    I was lucky to have a colleague from Kerala who visits it very often and hence I got the chance to visit and know about its existence and history. It's one of it's kind temple in Delhi. The temple gives "prasad" in the form of "Payasam" which is like one of the tastiest ever I have had and I literally got high eating it. Right in front of the temple there is a small tent/counter selling hot Idlis, Vadas, Dosas etc of authentic Kerala recipe. I surely had as much as I could of all of it and just to add - "it was pretty cheap" :D

    Temple Timings:
    SUMMERS:-
    Morning - 5.30 AM to 11 AM
    Evening - 6.00 PM to 9.00 PM

    WINTERS
    Morning - 6.00 AM to 11 AM
    Evening - 5.30 PM to 8.30 PM

    To know more about it's history and the main temple in Kerala pls go through the following link
    Guruvayur Temple

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    Gurdwara Bangla Sahib

    by solopes Updated May 13, 2014

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    Gurdwara Bangla Sahib - Delhi
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    Very impressive this visit to a Sikh temple.

    I was rather uncomfortable, wandering with a camera amidst so many people concentrated in their prayers, but they seemed used to it, and no one complained or had a less amicable sign or word.

    The pure white of the walls, the reflexions in the wide pond, the bright colors of the kerchief we were demanded to use, what a show!

    And inside, peace and tolerance in a very crowded space surrounded a beautiful altar.

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  • udtaparindaa's Profile Photo

    Raj Ghat

    by udtaparindaa Written Apr 27, 2014

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    The spot where Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi, the Father of our Nation was cremated after a day he was shot by Nathuram Godse. It is a black marble platform with a flame burning continuously.

    There are several other cremation spots of big leaders of India around Raj Ghat.

    Vijay Ghat for Lal Bahadur Shastri, Kisan Ghat for Choudhary Charan Singh and several others are the key ones and can be paid a visit to pay tribute.

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    Laxminarayan Temple

    by udtaparindaa Updated Apr 7, 2014

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    rear view of the temple
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    Or more famously known as Birla temple was built in pre-independence era and Inaugrated by Mahatma Gandhi (on the condition that no untouchability shall be practiced here and people from all castes and religion will be allowed to enter the temple and offer their prayers).

    It is a major tourist spot as well as a key religious spot for Hindus specially during Diwali and Janmashtmi when Lord Laxminarayan is worshiped. The temple has several small temples within its premises and a huge compound with small lawns and chariots and fountains laid all over which gives it a captivating look apart form the peace at offer there. I last visited it in Jan'2009 with my family.

    It's very close to Connaught Place, the heart of Delhi and the nearest metro station is R.K.Ashram Marg, located about 2 km away.

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    Cathedral Church of the Redemption

    by MM212 Updated Apr 5, 2014
    Main fa��ade of the Cathedral, Jan 2014
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    Inspired by and named after Palladio's Chiesa del Redentore in Venice, the Cathedral Church of the Redemption was designed by Henry Alexander Medd and consecrated in 1931. It was the church used by the British rulers of India. The church continues to serve the small Anglican Christian community in New Delhi and is the diocese of the Bishop of the Church of Northern India.

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    Rajpath

    by MM212 Updated Mar 15, 2014

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    Rajpath - Feb 2009
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    The most important avenue in New Delhi and perhaps all of India, Rajpath runs from India Gate all the way to Rashtrapati Bhavan, the President's House. The vast monumental avenue, whose name translates to "King's Way," hosts the annual Republic Day Parade on 26th January (which I witness on my second visit to New Delhi in 2014 - see travelogue). It is flanked by beautifully landscaped parks containing lawns, trees and ponds, which have remained since New Delhi was planned out by the British in the 1920s as the new capital of India under the British Empire. Landmark buildings around Rajpath that once served the ruling Brits, namely the Secretariat Buildings and Parliament House, are now the headquarters of the Indian government. Other nearby buildings include the National Archives, the National Museum and the Indira Gandhi National Centre for Arts.

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    Firoz Shah Kotla

    by MM212 Updated Feb 23, 2014

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    Ruins of Firoz Shah Kotla, Jan 2014
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    Delhi's fifth city, Firozabad (sometimes spelt Ferozabad), was built by Firoz Shah Tughlaq in 1354 as the capital city of the Delhi Sultanate. The grand city extended from Haus Khas in South Delhi all the way to this citadel, which is one of the few remains from this iteration of Delhi. The citadel, known as Firoz Shah Kotla, contained an imperial palace, the city's grand mosque, and a few other structures. Among them is an unusual red-brick pyramidal structure topped by a lone pillar, known as the Askan Pillar. It was brought here from Punjab in 1356 by Firoz Shah and is one of many Mauryan pillars with Brahmi inscriptions created by King Ashoka in the 3rd century BC. Nowadays, Firoz Shah Kotla is a nicely landscaped park enclosed within the original ramparts of the citadel and surrounded by the modern streets of New Delhi. The surviving ruins include the imperial palace, the Jami Masjid (grand mosque), the pyramidal structure with the Askan Pillar, and a circular baoli (step well). Most of the structures' original decorations were removed in the 17th century and reused in the construction of Shahjahanabad (today's Old Delhi) .

    For more photos, take a look at the Travelogue: "Firoz Shah Kotla."

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    Gurdwara Rakab Ganj Sahib

    by MM212 Written Feb 22, 2014
    Dome of Rakab Ganj Sahib Gurdwara, Jan 2014

    One of the more important Sikh temples in New Delhi, Rakab Ganj Sahib Gurdwara marks the site where the ninth Guru of the Sikhs cremated in 1675 after his beheading. The first temple was built here in 1783 during the brief takeover of Delhi by Sikh forces, but the existing white marble building is a modern structure. I only saw it from a distance and took the attached photo of the central dome.

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    India,,, must say..one of best place on earth

    by ShivDGadekar Written Jul 21, 2013
    Red Fort of India
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    Traveling in India is easy and safe. Information is easily available and people of India are very helpful. There might be some language barrier due to diversity in India with dialects but that doesn't stop you roaming around India. Some how across the web I found team of Ultimate Travel Jockey and now I am one of from them...and I am loving it.

    I cannot imagine the trip with out his- Travel Jockey expertise - guidance and explanation
    of daily activities that we saw that were so foreign to us but very common
    to the India Nationals . ( the explanation of Hindu temple / the sandals
    that we saw on the side of the road / the pilgrims that we saw ) We would
    not have had the understanding or appreciation of so many sites that we saw
    with out the guidance of Ultimate travel jockeys .

    its awesome

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    National Museum

    by albaaust Written Mar 12, 2013

    This is well worth a visit. There are a number of galleries tracing India’s history from the Stone Age through to the Bronze etc. It did not seem to have a section devoted to India’s recent history and move towards independence against the British. The miniature painting section is excellent and the Naval history section although quite small was also interesting and this gallery does include a section devoted to acknowledging recent heroes in the past naval battles with India’s near neighbours. There is a cafeteria on the 2nd floor where you can grab a meal or cup of tea.

    Cost: 300 rupees

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    Visit a huge memorial Humayun Tomb

    by albaaust Updated Mar 12, 2013
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    Humayun Tomb: This is quite a famous monument in Delhi. The complex itself has other tombs so make sure that you go to the main one first. As we went in we turned to the left and spent considerable time at the smaller..which was still interesting especially walking the small wall surrounding it.

    The straight through path in fact leads directly to Humayuan’s tomb which is rather a majestic building surrounded by beautiful gardens. The interior is sparse in keeping with other tombs.
    Cost: 250 rupees.

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    The Qutb Minar Complex.

    by lynnehamman Updated Oct 26, 2012

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    Iron Pillar in front of Mosque Ruins
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    This ancient complex houses the famous Qtub Minar, which is the tallest brick minaret in the world.Decorated with carvings from the Koran, it stands 73m high, and has five stories. The lower two were erected by Qutb-ud-din,ruler after the defeat of the last Hindu Kindgom in Delhi.Various successors after him added the upper stories, and the fifth story was added in 1368. It was, however, destroyed by an earthquake in 1803. An English patron replaced it and the cupola..
    The Minaret is a fine example of Indo-Islamic architecture.It may be climbed, to give a view of Delhi, but was closed the day we visited.
    In the complex also stands the ruins of the very first mosque to be built in Delhi (Quwwat-ul-Islam) It was constructed in 1190's , from marble pieces that had been taken from Jain Temples that were destroyed to make way for the mosque complex. All that remains today are the ruins of the mosque, and some pillars from the Jain temples.
    The famous IRON PILLAR is also a remnant from the Jain temple- it remains a mystery to many experts, who have not yet understood why it has never rusted, despite standing open to the elements for centuries. Metallurgists have tried for many years to find an answer.

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