Safety Tips in Bali

  • Warnings and Dangers
    by machomikemd
  • Warnings and Dangers
    by machomikemd
  • Warnings and Dangers
    by machomikemd

Most Viewed Warnings and Dangers in Bali

  • Rinjani's Profile Photo

    A Mystique Place?

    by Rinjani Written Nov 10, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Bali is rich in cultural and custom. There are rituals or customs giving eery impression. But they are still amazing though. There are few things that I am curious, for example what happen if women in menstruation period entering Pura? I am pretty sure that there are many women prefer to stay silent, so that they can still enter Pura. Some friends told me that usually there is light to heavy consequences for not following the request. The light one is health symptomps, such as headache, etc. The heavy one varies.
    My wise friends told me that I don’t have to believe things that difficult to accept in my own faith, but they gently remind me that be a good guest and respect a holy place of other religion followers.
    Another time, one of the guards in Pura told us about several trance has caused. He told us that sometimes the overjoy tourist forgot to respect the Pura. For example a girl who copy a pose of one of the statues in Pura and asked her friend to take her picture. Later in the night, the same girl came back with her group looking for the priest to cure her from the trance. The non-Balinese girl suddenly is very fluent speaking in a higher caste of Balinese language. Again, as my friend told me, you don’t have to believe stories you have heard. But, just keep your respect to the local people and their custom.

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  • bryINpoland's Profile Photo

    Temples, Sarongs and Waist Sash.

    by bryINpoland Written May 27, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Traveling throughout Bali, you will find that at some of the temples it is necessary to wear a sarong and waist sash if you wish to enter the temple. Though some temples provide them for free, others do not. This now leaves you with two options.

    The first option, is having your own sarongs and sash. We bought our own before going to the temples for about 30,000 Rp. ( A fair price for both you, and the merchant ) By having your own, it can eliminate having to buy or rent sarongs at each temple, and in the end can save you a lot of money.

    Your second option is ofcourse to rent a sarong or buy one at each temple. This can be stressful sometimes, since you end up renting one, for the price you can by one. You can sometimes rent them for about 10,000 Rp, but some places drive a hard bargain, and you may pay 20,000 Rp.

    In the end, i suggest buying some yourself, which can make great gifts later, or great souvenirs for yourself. It will save you money, and the time of having to bargain at every other temple.

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  • Ubudian's Profile Photo

    Money Changers

    by Ubudian Written Apr 9, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Money changers can be found all over Bali. Unfortunately, not all of them are honest, and some can be down right crooks.

    PT Central Kuta, which has offices all throughout Bali is the most highly recommended and consistently honest money changing business in Bali. Most expats I know will only use PT Central Kuta. Expect slight daily fluctuations in the rupiah conversion rates, but over the past few years, this generally hovers within a few percentage points of 9,100 IDR to the US dollar.

    Additional tips:

    US Currency...bring only new, unfolded crisp bills. Series 1997 $100 notes are not accepted in Bali anywhere, or by anybody. They are highly counterfeited and thus not accepted here. If your cash is to be US, bring only the most recent series notes.

    ALWAYS count your money BEFORE leaving the counter of any money changer. Anyone can make an honest miscount error, but for the dishonest money changer, this is what they are counting on...no pun intended.

    Try not to refer to your home currency as “real money.” In Bali, Indonesia rupiah is the “real” money.

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  • Wild_Orchid's Profile Photo

    The old Bait and Switch trick!

    by Wild_Orchid Updated Nov 28, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Street vendors who hang around at car-parks near major tourist attractions may tempt you with wood carvings or batik cloth or pencils or whatever at such cheap prices that you are simply amazed. In fact, they "attach" themselves to you as soon as you get out of the car! You sometimes you may just make a purchase to avoid being hassled any further or out of goodwill, especially when the vendor is a little girl of boy. (If you know what you're doing, and why, then it's fine. That's your good deed for the day.)

    However, be careful when offered an ivory carving or wood carving or something more valuable than a bunch of pencils when you have little time to examine the merchandise. At Kintamani, outside a major touristy restaurant, my husband was tempted to buy a small wooden carving, and when he handed over the money, the guy gave him the carving in a black plastic bag just as we were about to drive off. When he looked into the bag, it was not only completely different from the one that he had been shown, but also much poorer in quality and finish.
    To our alarm when we protested, the guy walked off with our money, leaving us with the inferior carving, but later returned with another one, which we also turned down and finally, we got our money back and left without making a purchase.

    Caveat Emptor!

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  • bryINpoland's Profile Photo

    Temple Guides, Uluwatu Temple, and Others...

    by bryINpoland Written May 27, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is a warning about Uluwatu temple, and can also apply to other temples around Bali.

    Uluwatu temple, is one of the more famous temples throughout Bali. Because of the heavy flow of visitors coming thru, this brings the oppertunity for people to make money, and Uluwatu temple is a perfect example of that.

    Upon entrance (which is around 4,000 Rp per person, and well worth it) you will be issued a guide. The reason for the guide, which if half true, is to not only show you the temple, but to keep the overly aggressive monkeys away from you. The monkeys are in fact aggressive (due to tourist feeding them) and its actually better to have someone with you to keep them back, so they dont climb all over you, and steal any loose item you possess. The guides carry sticks, which seems a little mean. Though they dont hit the monkeys, the monkeys are obviously scared of the sticks, suggesting they have been wacked before. To provent this, i suggest tourist stop feeding them, simple as that.

    At the end of your tour, the guide will now ask for a donation for his organization that runs the park. This is the tricky part. Do not let them suggest you a price, becuase it will come out to 20 or 30 bucks. On the other hand, the guides do show you the best angles to see the temples at, and save you from a lot of time wondering around the area. They also give some great info about the temple. Feel free to give them what you are happy giving, but i suggest about 20,000 to 30,000 Rp. If you want to give more, thats fine, but dont let them guilt you into it. Trust me they are good at it.

    In the end, Uluwatu temple is well worth paying a visit to. Its just better when you are aware of the situation. It can make things a lot more pleasant, eliminating some of the stress. Have a great time.

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  • luv2tango's Profile Photo

    Money Changers

    by luv2tango Updated Oct 16, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Be very careful when you exchange your money, especially at small storefront
    exchangers. My husband and I were ripped
    off even though my husband counted the money more than once.They distracted him by giving the wrong amount of smaller denomination bills and when he noticed they appeared to correct it but in the end cheated us out of even more. We met other people who this happened to at different moneychangers so it seems to be a popular scam.

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  • kenyneo's Profile Photo

    Mosquitos ? Lizards ?

    by kenyneo Written Mar 26, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Well i have heard alot about mosquitos and lizards from a number of VT pages , but thank god the place we stay ..I didnt even have a mosquito bite or see any lizards, perhaps it all depends on which hotel / resort you are staying .

    ( I guess non encounter with such creature can be a blessing , coz you will never know a single kiss by them can land you in hospital for a week either for Malaria or Dengue fever ...dont take chances ...you dont wanna spoil your vacation do you ?

    2 thumbs up for Kuta Beach Club !

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  • Linda_T's Profile Photo

    Money Changers

    by Linda_T Written Nov 3, 2004

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Always change your money at reputable money changers - Banks or Kodak shops are advisable. Ensure that a receipt will be given and make sure YOU are the last person who counts/touches your money as many moneychangers will try to short change you after they have counted it for you.

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  • diageva's Profile Photo

    Maybe they don't understand you

    by diageva Written Nov 28, 2003

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    Sometimes you speak and they don't understand you ... but the go on smiling and dont tell you that they dont understand, and if you ask them if the have understood they will go on smiling and saying yes with the head... but ... at last ... you will see that they haven't undertand you at all. TERIMA KASIH

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  • Beware of timeshare scam

    by picknick Written Apr 4, 2005

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    There will be many people on the streets offering you an instant lucky draw, after which they will exclaim that you have won some wonderful prizes, and to go back to their office to claim the prize. Then when you are in thier office, they will pressure you into buying a hotel timeshare scheme for lots of $. Beware, and refuse to accept any of such "lucky draws". This is not uncommon in asia, we have the same thing in Singapore some time ago.

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  • diageva's Profile Photo

    Trafic policemen

    by diageva Written Nov 16, 2003

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If your drive your own car be carefull because you will be surely stoped by a trafic policemen telling you that you have done something wrong and asking you money so that you dont have to go to the police station. With 20 rupias (the same price at wich you can buy a sharon) they will be conform and let you go.
    So, if you pass near a policeman this will send a sms to the mobil of other a in your way, then he stop you and tell you that you have advance another car without putting the lights for do it ... or something like that.
    A hot point of this kind of performance is the famouses bat cave.

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  • bryINpoland's Profile Photo

    Public Bathrooms

    by bryINpoland Written May 31, 2005

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    As a member of the male species, public bathrooms really dont present much of a problem for me in Bali, or in really in any part of the world. But if you are a female, well then this is a whole different story.

    When it comes to the restrooms in Hotels and most restaurants in Bali, you can pretty much find suitable facilities. But the farther you ventur into the country, tot he more remote locations, the more harder it is to find a restroom up to your standards.

    The picture to the left is typical example of the toilets throughout Bali's country sides, and around temples. This picture is actually of one of the better bathrooms. Unfortunatly i was to discustedby the other ones to take a picture, and didnt think to take one until i got to this one.

    I recommend bringing a spare role of tissue paper with you when touring around Bali, becuase at most facilities it is not provided. You would think the donation boxes at the bathrooms would go towards some toilet rolls. Guess not...

    Also you should know that the sink to the lest of the toilets, and the scooper within it, is to flush the toilets with. Simply scoop a cup full of water once you are finished with your business, and pour it down the toilet. Simply as that. I can also recommend carrying around maybe a small bottle of hand sanitizer, because soap is also not provided at most public toilets.

    Anyways, its all part of the adventure, and not so bad. Well if you are a guy...

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  • cadzand's Profile Photo

    Count the Rupiah's

    by cadzand Written Nov 2, 2003

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    1. Exchange :
    If you change USD or EUR, always count the Rupiah you get in exchange more than once. It is not unusual the employee counts the money upon the desk, hide it for a second or two and when he/she finally hands it over to you, some banknotes are missing.

    2. Airport taxe :
    When paying at the taxe-desk, do count the banknotes you pay. It happened to us, the lady asked for 100.000 Rupiah missing. Afterwards, she apologized for making a mistake, though we saw clearly she folded a banknote and hided it.

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  • cadzand's Profile Photo

    White or tanned ?

    by cadzand Written Nov 27, 2003

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Better be some tanned when you arrive...
    The whiter you skin is, the more you are considered as a newbe. Which means, you don't know anything about usual prices of the different goods and you're maybe not good in bargaining. First thing local people ask " when did you arrive" ? and "how long do you stay" ?

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  • Rinjani's Profile Photo

    Wannabe Guides

    by Rinjani Written Nov 10, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    In almost every tourism spot in Bali, there will be someone approaching you offer their service to be your guide. Some guides are very good. Information is useful. But there are also some people offer to be your guide although later they simply be your walking companion. The wannabe guide also can be a jackpot. Some are trying hard to show and explain to you about the place. But some have less clue. It is your option to use guide in a local spot. Nego the price first and stick with it. But if you are satisfied, tip is appreciated.

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