Pacitan Travel Guide

  • Hawksbill turtle (eretmochelys imbricata)
    Hawksbill turtle (eretmochelys...
    by theo1006
  • Taman Beach turtle conservation project
    Taman Beach turtle conservation project
    by theo1006
  • Basin with little turtles
    Basin with little turtles
    by theo1006

Pacitan Things to Do

  • theo1006's Profile Photo
    Hawksbill turtle (eretmochelys imbricata) 2 more images

    by theo1006 Updated Mar 4, 2014

    Turtle conservation seems to become en vogue. We discovered two places on East-Java's south coast where villagers initiated a conservation project with subsidy of the government. Where formerly the locals sold or consumed the eggs, they now actively try to aid the population of the turtles. We suspect that this is not pure love of nature; the villagers probably also have come to realize that a conservation project attracts visitors who spend money.

    We found the Taman Beach conservation project by accident, when we spotted a sign-board passing by on the road from Panggul to Pacitan. Like Taman Kili-kili the project was new.
    We visited Dusun Taman at the end of February after having seen turtles at Sukamade. But here that was out of season. The best month to come would be May, the season ending in August. If it is rainy season and you want to see egg-laying turtles, go to Sukamade.
    In the basins they had a few half-grown turtles, but also several small ones. The finest specimen was a penyu sisik (hawksbill turtle, eretmochelys imbricata), which is prized for its beautiful shell.

    Address: Taman beach on Damas bay, Hadiwarno village, Ngadirojo district, Pacitan regency.

    Directions: Coming from the north through Ngadirojo (also named Lorok), take the turnoff west just 400 before the bridge across Lorong river. After 2 km along this road find a sandy path to the beach, turn right when you have reached the beach.

    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism

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    by theo1006 Updated Nov 22, 2012

    If you happen to take the southern route from Solo to the east via Pacitan - not many foreigners actually do -, a stop at Goa Tabuhan (Tabuhan Cave) is a must.
    The half open cave is not so spectacular, the stalactites and stalagmites at Goa Gong are much more beautiful. The attraction is the gamelan music villagers make by hitting the stalactites. These have been selected for the exact notes as customary on the gamelan scale. As usual the rhythm is set by a drum and the orchestra accompanies one or more female singers.
    I do not remember what we paid last time. Probably a couple of 100,000 rupiah for a ten minute performance.
    If you feel like it, you can also enter deeper into the cave through a narrow corridor to an alcove where people sit to gain strength through meditation in the dark. See my 1974 pics in the travelogue..

    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism

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    Goa Gong - entrance 4 more images

    by theo1006 Updated Nov 22, 2012

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    Since the 1970ies Theo had been to Goa Tabuhan several times, but never yet to Goa Gong (als referred to as Goa Kalak). That stands to reason; when we finally went there in 2012 we learnt that the cave had only be opened to the public since 1995.
    Goa Gong was discovered in 1924 by two villagers, Mbah Noyosemito and Mbah Joyorejo, who were searching for water in a prolonged dry season. They spent seven home-made torches before finding the pools in the bottom of the cave.
    The cave takes its name from some stalactites which sound like a gong when hit. A tour in the cave takes you down through several chambers a distance of 250 m from the entrance. It is said to be the most beautiful cave in South-East Asia, which we cannot confirm as we have not seen them all. Yet the stalactites and stalagmites are impressive, some of marble, some of translucent crystal. Coloured lighting, which is evident on some pics we found on the internet, indeed enhances the attractiveness of Goa Gong. But that lighting was not functioning when we visited.
    Gong Cave lies under a private-owned limestone hill. The local government had the stairs and lighting installed, but the owner, now living in Solo, still cashes part of the proceeds from visitors. One pays Rp 5,000 for admission and Rp 2,000 for parking a car. You can rent a torchlight for Rp 3,000 and there are local guides available for Rp 20,000.
    We advise to take a guide, and to come in the rainy season. We came at the end of the dry season and found the pools at the bottom almost dry. Better also to avoid holidays when one has to await ones turn and the cave becomes stuffy. Our guide said that people have fainted from lack of fresh air. A couple of big fans does not seem to help much.

    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism

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