Makassar Local Customs

  • Signage & Direction to cave
    Signage & Direction to cave
    by wondersF
  • Trail head - half hidden, seen when approached
    Trail head - half hidden, seen when...
    by wondersF
  • The stairs itself
    The stairs itself
    by wondersF

Most Recent Local Customs in Makassar

  • wondersF's Profile Photo

    Make your dreams come true - Go Bantimurung

    by wondersF Written Jan 15, 2011

    I had an interest in exploring caves, and that was in the early 1990s. I had since stopped caving as the hobby was called.
    Recently the media reported and also showed a documentary of a large cave in central Vietnam. This newly found cave took over the title of the world's largest cave away from previous title holder Rajah Caves of Mulu, Sarawak, Malaysia.

    Why that short introduction on Caves? In the anxious search for birds in Bantimurung, I overlooked the fact that there were reports of caves there. Not until I was prompted by the signs when I was already in the Park.

    The 2 notable caves could only be reached by a level paved walkway following the river's bank on top of the waterfall in the park. That day, heavy rainfall got the river to overflow its bank earlier in the day and though the water level by the time we arrived had dropped. This walkway to the cave entrance, it was quite a task to walk on the coating of silt. But trotting slowly we made that 800 meters. Then upon arrival, we could only see the cave's formations without chances of doing recording. Something that I normally would not miss. That is the main reason that I am going back in mid-march with some sort of flash to assist in harvesting some pictures.

    There are 2 notable caves in Bantimurung National Park. Gua Batu and Gua Mimpi. Not many local residents in Makasaar had got drag into this hobby of exploring caves or photographing caves scene. So little is knwon about these caves.

    Then, the local visitor to the caves, were all attracted by a legend relating to the Love cave in Gua Mimpi. As the name shows "Cave of Dreams."
    In this Gua Mimpi, there is small chamber also with a small stalactite. Following a passage to enter this chamber, one part of the passage way was low and virtually go on your knees to pass through. Visitors would come to this point to tie a string on it onto the this stalactites. Legend has it that the action could assist to reinforced their dreams. In that chamber, devotees should also wash your face with water dropping from the stalactite.

    Gua Batu, on the other hand had a wooden plank walk to avoid having to step on pools of water on the cave floor. The passage was impressively 500 meters long, I also read that it could even be 800 meters. I must try to measure it. Whereas in Gua Mimipi, have to use caution walking in the floor itself.

    There were vendors renting out torch lights at Rp10 per piece. Or hurricane oil lamp which has better coverage at Rp 50 per piece.
    I will be planning to get some pictures of the cave in my next trip

    Signage & Direction to cave Trail head - half hidden, seen when approached The stairs itself walkway of silt entrance - Gua Mimpi
    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Adventure Travel
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • RoyJava's Profile Photo

    Currency

    by RoyJava Updated Aug 6, 2008

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    To change your money in Indonesia could be a problem when you are in the country. They just can not change when you want to change a lot of money at once.

    Better change your money in the airport (not so good rate) or in the hotel. You could look for an ATM to get money with credit-card ( in the Makassar Hotel and others ).

    Indonesia's currency is the Rupiah with banknotes of 1000, 5000, 10000, 20000, 50000 and 100000 Rupiah.

    Last rate:
    100.000 Indonesian Rupiah = 0.007094 Euro

    100.000 Euro (EUR) = 1,409,618 Indonesian Rupiah (IDR)

    1 US Dollar = 9,099.00 Indonesian Rupiah

    indonesian-money
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Road Trip
    • Luxury Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • RoyJava's Profile Photo

    Local Belief

    by RoyJava Updated Jul 7, 2005

    People of all races do want to believe in rejuvenation. All sort of legends they behold as true and, the licence to the "make-me-young-again". Included the wish to keep beautiful, too!

    So there still are places all over the Indonesian islands, mostly lakes or places along the kali/river, where you could get back some "beauty". A lot of young girls love to wash their faces 3 times with particular water, like in Bantimurung, Ujung Pandang, people told me. To me it must be a redemption (nothing for nothing...).

    I used to be a make-up artist, you know!

    kali-bantimurung-ujungpandang
    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • RoyJava's Profile Photo

    Terima Kasih Banyak - Thanks A Lot

    by RoyJava Updated Jul 7, 2005

    No, no restaurant around, and so hungry! Sailing to one of the coral island offshore of Ujung Pandang our Makassarese companion immediately stopped a fisherman's prahu and "ordered" some fresh fishes. Locals on the island made a fire and roasted our food-to-be. This was so neat, and so well-known of the Indonesians,...

    terima kasih banyak
    thanks a lot guys

    fresh-fish-food-ujungpandang
    Related to:
    • Beaches
    • Sailing and Boating
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • ukirsari's Profile Photo

    tania, inge, mi .....

    by ukirsari Updated Sep 3, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    That's not women names I want to mention, but it's part of Bugis lingo for conversation :)
    There are several local lingo and dialects using in daily activities in Makassar. From Mandar, Bajo, also Bugis as the main local lingo. I remember several of the words. Nice to be pronounced, normally ended with 'a'. Like to say 'makassar' becomes 'mangkassara', to say 'not' [english] is 'tania' or 'nose' [english] becomes 'inge' >> which are these additional 'a' or several word remind me of women names :D
    And if talking using Indonesian, local accent ended with 'toh' or 'mi'. For example, "Nyanda bisa gitu, Mi." or in Indonesia, "Tidak bisa begitulah." or in English, "Can not be like that, Man."

    Makassar Sky 32,000 feet (c) ukirsari
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Backpacking
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Makassar

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

39 travelers online now

Comments

Makassar Local Customs

Reviews and photos of Makassar local customs posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Makassar sightseeing.

View all Makassar hotels