Nagoya Local Customs

  • Local Customs
    by machomikemd
  • Local Customs
    by machomikemd
  • Local Customs
    by machomikemd

Most Recent Local Customs in Nagoya

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    Nagoya and Japanese Keychains

    by machomikemd Written Nov 26, 2013
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    Keychains are one of the most common souvenir items. They are very inexpensive and small to store both while traveling home and don't take up much room in a home. Keychains can act as a reminder of the trip since they can be carried around during everyday life. They also are gender and age neutral and can appeal to many types of vacation shoppers like me. Well Keychains in Japan are expensive and these bronze ones cost 350 yen each while plastic ones costs 300 yen each and the keychains are available in souvenir shops and airport shops. in other areas of the world, bronze keychains only costs 150 yen each!

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    Nagoya Shot Glasses

    by machomikemd Written Nov 26, 2013
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    a nice souvenir of Nagoya as I'm a collector of shot glasses. I bought one since i'm an avid shot glass collector besides being an equal avid refrigerator magnet collector. I have lots of shot glass collection in my study table and buying a Nagoya shot glass is a must to bolster my collection. shot glasses here in japan comes in different designs and kinds of glasses like the frosted glass, tempered glass, regular glass, etc. and the prices starts at 400 yen for a simple frosted shot glass and goes up to 1,000 yen for a larger tempered glass shot glass, you can try to haggle but haggling is difficult in japan as it is not in the culture.

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    Nagoya Fridge Magnets

    by machomikemd Written Nov 26, 2013
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    another cool collection from Nagoya as I'm also a refrigerator magnet collector too. Refrigerator Magnets are nice stuffs for a souvenir, I have been an avid collector of refrigerator magnets since i've started travelling and has tons of the stuff at my refrigerator that some are just stored to my cabinet due to lack of space hehehe. here in Nagoya, i must buy one and the choices are endless and the prices start from 400 yen for a simple plastic ref magnet and 700 yen for the porcelain heavy ref magnet. the ref magnets are available in souvenir shops, at the centrair airport, so for the ref magnets enthusiasts, buy one now!

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    Atsuta Shrine, a real Japanese treasure

    by cvilla007 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    A centuries old tree in Atsuta

    Some people think that there's not any good traditional Japanese culture in Nagoya. I thought so too until I visited Atsuta. You must check it out. The forest has 500-hundred year old trees. This is probably the most important Shinto shrine in Japan. Check out the website link for more info.

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    O-hanami

    by cvilla007 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Cherry blossoms in Aratama, Nagoya

    O-hanami means 'flower-viewing'. It happens around the end of every April. This is the time when the Japanese purge themselves of the past year and prepare for the challenges of a new year (May to April represents a year for most businesses and schools in Japan).

    If you're in Japan during this time, you won't miss hanami. It's going on everywhere there's a cherry blossom tree. There are great times all around. Older people usually break out the karaoke machine. Young people gather with their schoolmates. Everybody eating and drinking sake. Some people just walking. Truly the most beautiful time of the year. Please plan your visit during o-hanami.

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    Smoker's Dilemma

    by Hewer Written Jul 12, 2005
    Errr.. what should I do?

    Not so much a local custom - moreso a wacky local regulation. I saw this at a pedestrian crossing and just had to take a picture. The information on the right advises "No Smoking", whilst the information on the left tells us not to drop our cigarette butts. What should I do if I'm in the middle of a smoke when I see this? Eat it?

    Unlike most Japanese cities, Nagoya restricts smoking in public places. Pedestrian crossings are one such example. Something to bear in mind if you are a smoker.

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    Osu Kannon Temple

    by cvilla007 Written Apr 30, 2005

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    This temple is a 20th-century reconstruction, but worth the visit. You can see Buddhist monks praying and also put a 5-yen coin into a big pot for good luck. They have a flea market here on the 18th and 28th every month, and lots of festivals. The temple is really close to Osu Kannon shopping arcade, another place you must see.

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    Elections!!!

    by manuelEB Written Jul 24, 2004

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    poster

    A democracy is a form of government in which the people, either directly or indirectly, take part in governing. However, the term is also sometimes used as a measurement of how much influence a people has over their government, as in how much democracy exists. The word democracy originates from the Greek "demos" meaning "the people" and "kratein" meaning "to rule" or "the people to rule" which meant literally: "Rule by the People."

    A modern democracy implies certain rights for citizens:

    * right to elect government through free and fair elections
    * freedom of speech
    * the rule of law
    * human rights
    * freedom of assembly
    * freedom from discrimination

    Verbatim form the web. But at least, i say it!!!. (-;

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    Blaming others for own faults. Not in Japan

    by manuelEB Written Oct 12, 2003

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    Bring me a scape goat!!!

    I am asked or almost on daily basis about how is like to live in Japan? "Two extremes!" I 've been told, regarding my "Latin culture" and the Japanese ways.

    Well , it is not that different if you pay attention to the details and forget a little bit about the many times digested predjuices you could have about Far East and "Latin Culture". But there is, indeed, a big difference in how the regular Japanese citizen tackles certain problems. In case of failure or accident, the Japanese would never automatically blaim others to save face and responsability. Perhaps, very innocently, it will make an introspective analysis of his/her faults and will come up with a more balanced view. If it has to accept a degree of responability, or the whole responsability, it will.

    I have learned a lot in this in 20 years, but I do recognize that I still get very upset when I have to deal with western people that automatically blaim others, and happily call name others, when failure and/or accidents occurred because their own faults.

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    Here are a few points of...

    by flyingkiwi Written Sep 7, 2002

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    Here are a few points of Japanese etiquette that will make your trip go more smoothly.

    Bowing: Japanese don't shake hands, the bow. The angle of the bow depends on the relationship between the two people. Friends may merely nod their heads while greeting the emperor necessitates a deep bow with your head down to your needs (be warned - this takes some doing but unless you plan to have an auduence with the emperor, don't worry about it too much!). Japanese who have some knowledge of the West will often put out their hands to shake. The best advice is to follow the lead of the person you are greeting.

    Name cards: Everyone in Japan has a name card called meishi and business people exchange them as soon as they meet. You won't need them while travelling for pleasure but the are mandatory for business.

    Names: Japanese traditionally write the family name first, followed by the given name. Usually Japanese are addressed by their family name; followed by a 'san', an all-purpose honorific meaning Mr., Mrs., or Ms. Don't call Japanese by their given names unless they specifically request you to.

    Footwear: Japanese exchange shoes for slippers when they enter houses and remove the slippers when walking on tatami (straw) mats. You will also have to remove your footwear when entering a Buddhist temple. Wearing slip-on shoes will make your life easier.

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    There are lots of foreigners...

    by palmesian Written Sep 7, 2002

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    There are lots of foreigners living in Nagoya.Some of the foreigners have been living in Nagoya for more than 10 years and they consider this place as their second home. Nagoya is a nice place to live and work....I really miss Nagoya and my friends there.

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    If you are interested in the...

    by Hotboy_san Written Aug 26, 2002

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    If you are interested in the Japanese culture and writing, necessarily go on an exhibition of hieroglyphs. It is very interesting and cognitive. The spelling of hieroglyphs in Japan is considered art.

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    Some public restrooms don't...

    by selenium Written Aug 26, 2002

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    Some public restrooms don't have any toilet paper. Never refuse free tissues when they're being handed out.

    For some reason it's frowned upon to walk and eat at the same time; no one will scold you, but some people will stare.

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  • sczabeti's Profile Photo

    Scattered throughout Japan are...

    by sczabeti Written Aug 25, 2002

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    Scattered throughout Japan are shrines, temples, and other places of worship. The Toshogu shrine pictured here is just another example of the detailed architecture and beautiful trees and gardens which surround them. I can't help but feel at peace here.

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    Not sure if this is a custom...

    by Logan575 Written Jun 25, 2003
    Something in the coffee?

    At the JR train station, out in the strong sun, several of the people were basking in the heat after weeks of rain and grey skies.

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Nagoya Local Customs

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