Nagoya Castle, Nagoya

4 out of 5 stars 4 Stars - 46 Reviews

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • Rebuilding Honmaru Palace
    Rebuilding Honmaru Palace
    by Rabbityama
  • Inside Nagoya Castle
    Inside Nagoya Castle
    by Rabbityama
  • And a Palace
    And a Palace
    by taigaa001
  • woef's Profile Photo

    Kinshachi-jo

    by woef Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    nagoya

    In 1610 Tokugawa Ieyasu ordered the construction of Nagoya-jo to solidify the Tokugawa authority in Owari (Nagoya and vicinity). The castle was completed in 1612 and Tokugawa's ninth son Yoshinao entered the castle in 1616 from which he governed over Owari.

    Nagoya-jo is famous for the 2 golden shachihoko that adorn the top of its donjon. That is why it is also known as "Kinshachi-jo." Kin means "gold" and shachi refers to the killer whale type mythical creatures that sit atop the donjon and other castle structures.

    Related to:
    • Theme Park Trips
    • Family Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • elcbw's Profile Photo

    Nagoya Castle

    by elcbw Updated Jul 19, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Nagoya Castle

    Nagoya Castle was built in the beginning of the Edo Period for one of the three Tokugawa family branches, the Owari. Consequently, Nagoya developed into an important castle town and ultimately Japan's fourth largest city.

    The castle was almost completely destroyed in the air raids of World War II. The current ferro-concrete reconstruction dates from 1959.

    The interior of the castle is now a modern museum displaying the castle's history. The castle park becomes a popular hanami spot during the cherry blossom season.

    Was this review helpful?

  • TexasDave's Profile Photo

    Impressive Castle

    by TexasDave Updated Oct 26, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1 more image

    The original was built in 1612 but destroyed in WW II. What you see now is a faithful reproduction done in concrete. You can take an elevator up to the top and you work your way down while viewing many antique painted screens and sliding doors, which were hidden away before the attacks. There is also a short movie showing the way it looked after the attack and how it was restored.
    Admission is 500 Yen.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • taigaa001's Profile Photo

    Tenshu-kaku(Castle Keep, Donjon)

    by taigaa001 Written Sep 12, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Nagoya Castle Keep from Honmaru Plaza
    3 more images

    Tenshu(kaku) is the Japanese castle fixture which draws huge number of tourists from all over the world. It is a main castle keep originally developed from watchtower of Central Enclosure(Honmaru). The first Tenshu for the castle was built by Nobunaga Oda in 1576, a seven-storied Azuchi Castle main keep. As time goes by Tenshu became more of the demonstration of power and wealth than for defensive function. Nagoya castle tenshu was built by the order of Iyeyasu Tokugawa in 1612. The original castle used to be the grandeur wooden castle even designated as National Treasure but it was burned down during the second world war. Current tenshu 48.27m in total height(35.85m from the castle base top) was rebuilt with reinforced-concrete in 1959. The newer tenshu is seven-storied and tries to keep the exterior of the original castle as much as they can. Tenshu of Nagoya castle is categorized as Renketsu style, joining with minor tenshu to enhance the defence. So you enter the castle from minor castle then you cross the joint corridor with a lot of defensive tricks to enter the larger tenshu.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • salisbury3933's Profile Photo

    Nagoya Castle

    by salisbury3933 Written Jan 27, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    2 more images

    I only had a couple of hours in Nagoya on my way to Tokyo, so I got on the subway from Nagoya station and got off at station 'Shiyakusho'.

    The castle itself is well worth visiting, it's one of the better castles in Japan, although it doesn't compare with the great Himeji, although what can?

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • arianne_1504's Profile Photo

    Nagoya Castle

    by arianne_1504 Updated Jun 12, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    3 more images

    Beautiful grounds, especially in Spring. Definitely a must visit whilst in Nagoya.

    Open 9:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Entrance to the donjon until 4:10 p.m
    Closed December 29 - January 1

    Cost:
    Adult: Individual 500yen
    Child: Individual 100yen

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • Rabbityama's Profile Photo

    Nagoya Castle

    by Rabbityama Written Oct 26, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Nagoya Castle
    4 more images

    Nagoya Castle is one of the former Tokugawa Castles. The original castle was actually built prior to the Tokugawa in 1518 by the Imagawa. It was conquered by Oda Nobuhiga but the castle was left to fall into disrepair until Tokugawa Ieyasu built a new Nagoya Castle here. The castle and the surrounding castle town grew considerably under Tokugawa rule. Nagoya Castle was the most important of the Tokugawa Castles (the other two were Wakayama Castle and Mito Castle).

    Unfortunately, the honmaru was destroyed in WWII however, three of the gates and many of the castle's treasures were spared, so remnants of the original still exist. The honmaru was rebuilt in 1959. When I went, they were rebuilding the Honmaru Palace so I could see how they built parts of the castle.

    Entrance is 500 yen.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • taigaa001's Profile Photo

    Foundation Stones of Original Donjon

    by taigaa001 Updated Sep 2, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The original donjon was burned down

    In Ofukemaru area, there are foundation stones of original donjon which was lost by the fire during the second world war. When the donjon was being rebuilt, the foundation stones of the original donjon was moved to the present place. Current donjon built with reinforced concrete was completed in 1959.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • taigaa001's Profile Photo

    Inside the Castle Keep

    by taigaa001 Written Sep 5, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Shachihoko for Memorial Photo
    2 more images

    The castle keep of Nagoya castle is seven-storied but since this is the third visit to the donjon there weren't so much particular things to see for me. What I found interesting is film-set like old Nagoya town on the third floor and the section to experience the pulling of large stone on the fifth floor. Also there is a mock shachihoko for memorial photo. On the first floor you can have a short 3D promotional film about Honmaru Palace a part of which will be opened on May 29, 2013.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Hewer's Profile Photo

    Nagoya Castle

    by Hewer Updated Jul 13, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Nagoya Castle and Moat

    Entry costs 500 yen for adults and 100 yen for children under 15.

    It's open from 9am - 4:30pm every day. Closed December 29th to January 1st.

    It was built in 1612 by a Shogun named Tokugawa Ieyasu and was largely destroyed by bombing in World War II. The restored exterior is a replica of the original but inside it's very different - they have elevators and closed circuit TV! There is plenty of information in English there and it's worth checking out.

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • kiwigal_1's Profile Photo

    Nagoya Castle

    by kiwigal_1 Updated Apr 4, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Nagoya-jo

    Nagoya-jo or Nagoya Castle was originally built in the 1600's by Tokugawa Ieyasu. The castle that stands now was re-built using concrete in 1959.

    The website link below is the official site of Nagoya Castle. Sorry it is only available in Japanese.

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel
    • Trains

    Was this review helpful?

  • PartyRambo's Profile Photo

    Nagoya Castle

    by PartyRambo Updated Mar 23, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Construction on the castle was completed in 1612, on the orders of Ieyasu Tokugawa, for protection against invaders from Osaka, and as an important location on the Tokaido highway.
    One of the Tokugawa families lived there for about 250 years.
    Air raids in May 1945 destoyed most of the buildings.
    Fortunately, 3 corner towers & gates, and most of the fancy sliding door paintings in the Hommaru Palace building survived.
    On top of the peak are the best-known features of this castle - the Golden Dolphons (kinshachi).
    it is said that the 1st dolphins (shachi) appeared in the Muromachi Ear (1334-1400) as a symbol of a feudal lord's authority.
    The original dolphins were destroyed by the air raid, but rebuilding was completed in 1959.
    A few statistics on the current dolphins:
    -1 male, 1 female
    -Each about 9 feet long
    -Each about 2,650 lbs
    -Each has about 95 lbs of 18k gold (worth roughly $500,000 USD at current market value).

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • wathy's Profile Photo

    Nagoya Castle

    by wathy Written Feb 28, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Nagoya Castle

    There are many castles in Japan, and for me, they all look alike......
    The way for me to differ this castle is - the golden dolphin on the roof ^^;

    You can found the replica of the dolphin inside castle and you also can take a picture with it.

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • taigaa001's Profile Photo

    The Remains of Ancient Nagoya Castle

    by taigaa001 Updated Aug 29, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The nameplace Nagoya came from Nagoya clan, one of the illegitimate family clans of Imagawa Clan who governed Owari province during 15th to early 16th century. The area current Nagoya castle stands at that time belonged to Nagoya clan. Ujichika Imagawa first built a fort called Yanaginomaru during 1521-28. In 1532 Nobuhide Oda, father of Nobunaga took over the castle feigning sickness and with his private warriors. It is said the Nobunaga was born in this castle and later was made to a lord of the castle until Nobunaga moved to Kiyosu in 1555. After Nobunaga moved to Kiyosu the castle lords changed after another and gradually became less important and consequently abandoned. Old castle ruins near the Ninomaru Teahouse only has a monument and the guideboard and compared to the grandeur of current castle it remains neglected. Only history buffs ever care about this place.

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • taigaa001's Profile Photo

    Outer Moat(Soto-bori, Mizubori)

    by taigaa001 Updated Aug 29, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Nagoya Castle Donjon Viewed from the Water Moat
    4 more images

    Nagoya castle has three-tiered moat structure. The moat with immence body of water is called Outer Moat(Soto-bori) but it is structually the second moat. To differentiate the Sannomaru Outer Moat also carrying Sotobori name which is dry, Nagoya people simply call it MIZUBORI(watered moat). On the north side of the castle there is no need to build another moat because north of the watered moat there used to lie marsh land and Hori river which served as the natural defence. That's why the northside of this second moat is really wide and it is also for making the attacks by the gun fires very difficult. This watered moat provodes a walking course and a running circuit for joggers. The most popular viewpoint of this moat is near the Northwest Tower nicknamed as Kiyosu Tower close to the Westin Nagoya Castle Hotel. It is believed that the tower was reconstructed with the building materials used for Kiyosu Castle. Northeast and South part of the moat is dry. I have no idea if it has always been that way.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Nagoya

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

89 travelers online now

Comments

Hotels Near Nagoya Castle
4.0 out of 5 stars
1 Opinions
0.6 miles away
5.0 out of 5 stars
3 Opinions
0.7 miles away
Show Prices
3.5 out of 5 stars
3 Opinions
0.8 miles away
Show Prices

View all Nagoya hotels