Narita Things to Do

  • Can't get any fresher !!!!
    Can't get any fresher !!!!
    by jlanza29
  • Things to Do
    by rosequartzlover1
  • Things to Do
    by rosequartzlover1

Most Recent Things to Do in Narita

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    Gion Matsuri festival.

    by rosequartzlover1 Updated Jul 15, 2014

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    (part4 ) About people who join the festival.
    1.Young people will carry the rope in the front part,the rope is very long ..enough to let almost the whole village children to join.The very young one will come out to join the festival during the day time,I didn't see them at night,probably go back drink milk and sleep already : ) (The other kids which are older still join until late night.) Their parents can join and walk inside between the rope.Others can join too but has to walk along the road side which became very narrow,so sometimes I have to be very careful,I almost fell few times because of walking backward and busying take them pictures,and this time I used mobile phone instead of camera.
    During the walk ,they repeated some words that leader asked them to say,I didn't understand what the words were.
    2.You'll see that there were many people join the festival.There were police and security assisted around ,and they kept signalling to people to step aside when the float need to pass the slope area ,we have to be behind the barrier rope.
    3.The area that the float men has the meeting before and after each parade.It's kind of their smoking and drinking area too.
    4-5 Many people dressed in their traditional costume especially at night.It was so beautiful ,I love it. It couldn't help to ask them to take picture....lovely.
    ( I still have more pictures and little more story to share ..you can see in my travel logues Narita.)

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    Gion Matsuri festival.

    by rosequartzlover1 Updated Jul 13, 2014

    (part 3) The parade.
    1.Because of the strength that require to pull the huge float around the village, the organizer people mostly are young people (from 20-35 years old) but later during process the whole village become involved.
    You can see the float-carts are displayed with lanterns hanging on the sides to light them up for festival.
    2.Another team waiting for their turn to start.They did the loop ,starting near Naritasan Shinshoji temple area..along Omotesando road up to the train station and turn left ..loop back to the temple.
    At the side and the back of the cart ..always accompanied by some seniors in traditional costume .
    3The headmen standing or walking in front of the cart ,made a sound and rhythm through loudspeaker ,most of them with a whistle.The music and singing is describe by villagers as ‘ Kagura’ ,sacred music,traditionally perform to please god in Shinto festivals.
    On top of the float ,there are few men performing like dancing or cheer leader ,carrying in their hands a lantern and waving it along the rhythm or lets say ..they are a kind of conductor to let the team walk and pull the rope in the same rhythm.Some time they say something like "hoi-ya' ,some time other words, I don't know what does it mean.

    4.After passing temple area ,the road become a slope.Staff have to clear the road side ,asking people to give way ..prepare for the hard pulling and run.I had to stop walking for a while ,would like to see this moment.
    After the fun hard pulling and arriving the flat level again.Still can see their action of pulling with full force.
    5.People from upstair of the shops along the way giving money to the float .They just put the 1,000 yen bank note attached on the end tip of a long stick to be able to reach the float men.The way they do look like 'fishing' . I don't know if they just give the money with pleasure for fun ,or to buy some sacred sovounir from the float like in Gion festival in Kyoto.
    You'll see the cart was covered by plastic shade ,it's a pity that it was rain for whole day even not hard but showerring all day.But that didn't stop people from coming out to join the festival because in the evening till night there were thousand of people joining the festivity.

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    Gion Matsuri festival.

    by rosequartzlover1 Written Jul 13, 2014

    (part 2) About the cart (the float) ...
    1.The float is made entirely by wood ,with some elaborate carving on the wood.
    2.The cart are pulled by the ropes at the front (and the back ) which are held by group of village school children.The first part of the parade will lead by a group of about 10 young girls in traditional costume carrying a metal stick that keep knocking on the ground to make rhythm.Followed by the children who some accompanied by their parents(see pic on part 1) ,will pull the rope in the very front part and the stronger one will pull the rope near the cart itself.
    3.You'll see the white box ,it's the box of drinks,mostly alcohol drink like 'sake' or beer.Naturally the youngsters get more and more drunk as the journey proceeds ,but not only youngsters drank I saw the seniors drank too, to enjoy the festival.
    4.The next float prepare to move after the other float had finished their loop.The musician just climbing up to start the next show.
    5.Another float ,this one has a little bit metal decoration.

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  • rosequartzlover1's Profile Photo

    Gion Matsuri festival.

    by rosequartzlover1 Written Jul 12, 2014

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    (part 1)
    I was lucky to be in Narita at the time of this festival.I was there on the first of the three days.
    The Narita Gion Festival is a summer festival,held for 3 days in early July.(mostly the first weekend of July ,start from Friday to Sunday ,so this year 2014 it was held on 4-6 July) This festival has continued for over 300 years.It 's happening around Naritasan Shinshoji temple and the old town.It is celebrating from morning till night. Starting with the passage of a portable shrine on the first day. The parade composed of ‘Goshintai’ or Shinto object of worship, on a 'mikoshi' (portable shrine) and many decorated floats.There are about 10 different floats are drawn through the Omotesando Road( the road between train station and the temple) and around. With hundreds of dancers and musicians (sitting on each carts), all performing at the same time to different rhythms and steps. The greatest highlight is "Sobiki"on the third day. Young people standing on the floats encourage the runners to carry them up the steep slope of Nakamachi.

    This festival is dedicated to Dainichi-Nyorai (Dainichi Buddha). It is the mixing between Bhuddist and Shinto . It is the largest festival of Narita and more than 400,000 visitors come.

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    Omotesando

    by IreneMcKay Written Jun 1, 2014

    Omotesando is a picturesque street stretching from Narita's railway stations to the Naritsan Temple. This street is lined with wooden buildings housing shops and restaurants. For centuries pilgrims passed along this stall lined street on their way to the temple.

    Narita Town. Narita Town. Narita Town. Narita Town.
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    Naritasan Temple

    by IreneMcKay Written Jun 1, 2014

    Naritasan Shinshoji Temple is a Buddhist temple. It was built in 940. Its most sacred treasure is a statue of the Buddhist Fudo Myoo deity, one of the five kings of wisdom. This statue was carved by Kobo Daishi, a learned monk who founded the Shingon or True Word Sect of Buddhism.

    You enter the temple through a large gateway. There are ponds with turtles and stone tablets on either side of the stairs leading up to the temple buildings. Temple buildings include the great pagoda of peace, Shotoku Taishi Hall and a three storied pagoda.

    Naritasan Temple. Great Pagoda of Peace. Shotoku Taishi Hall. Naritasan Temple.
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    Naritasan Calligraphy Museum, Japan ...

    by TrendsetterME Written Feb 29, 2012

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    Naritasan Park is a large garden with a gross area of 165,000 m2, located behind the main building of the Naritasan Shinshoji Temple. Especially noteworthy are the flowering trees and shrubs around Monju pond and Ryuju pond, displaying exquisite colors through all seasons.

    Inside the park is also a calligraphy museum (fee charged), where many modern calligraphy masterworks are exhibited.

    It is located directly at the entrance of the exhibition hall, viewers are greeted by an enormous charcoal rubbing 'Gentaku Kitaizanmei', which is 13.3 meters in height and is 5.3 meters wide. This rubbing portrays the first emperor of China and has come to be a symbol for the museum. The museum houses a large number of famous calligraphy masterpieces dating from the late Edo period.

    Visiting to the Naritasan Calligraphy Museum is an eye-opening visit where you can experience beautiful writing art, strongly suggested ... :)

    Naritasan Calligraphy Museum, Japan Naritasan Calligraphy Museum, Japan Naritasan Calligraphy Museum, Japan
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  • Narita is Great City!

    by jmhorville Written Jun 22, 2011

    -Narita Airport is proclaimed “safe” by Delta Airlines after the radiation and earthquake crisis (just thought I would throw that in there for some of you doubtful travelers) :)

    -Narita Town is a great attraction that is close to the Narita Airport. Its a few minutes away from the airport by train. Narita town has a famous temple, dozens of restaurants, and lots of shopping places.

    -If we have a lot of time, we can take a train to Shinjuku, Ueno, or Akihabara (small wards in Tokyo.) The average time it takes to travel from Narita Airport to those places take around 1 hour & 45 minutes.

    -Shinjuku doesn’t sound like that much of a great place. It consists mostly of high class restaurants, bars, and places where Korean & Japanese musicians and actors like to hang out. People say that the only good thing there is in Shinjuku is the skyscrapers. You can get a really good view of Tokyo when you climb them.

    -Ueno is home to some of Tokyo’s finest cultural sites. There are many Buddhist temples that are located in this area. Ueno Park and Ueno Station are home to the largest homeless populations in Japan. It is not much of a “rich” area of Tokyo.

    -Akihabara is a major shopping area for electronic, computer, anime, otaku goods, and new and used items. This is a high-tech, neon-lit neighborhood. The Sony Plaza is one of the most famous shopping destinations in the district. You can get good bargains in the small shops. People say it’s a good place for “Americans” to shop for cheap electronic goods. Overall, the ratings for this place have been in between because this city is mainly known for selling their electronics and cartoon (anime) merchandise.

    -The food that Narita specializes in is unagi (eel). People say that the eel over there is so fresh, that they will grab the live eel, kill it, open it up, clean it, slice it for you, and put it over an open flame grill. The eel usually takes around 10 minutes to be fully prepared for you to eat. Its about 1000 yen for a skewer of eel. The Naritasan Shinsho Temple is a heavily visited tourist destination. Some people say that you should just take a straight walk down Narita Town. There are a few streets where it is very relaxing to walk down. On the way of your walk, you will see people’s houses, some shops, and numerous restaurants. They also have a lot of Fish Markets. There are also a lot of noodle shops that are there too.

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    Omotesando .. Narita main tourist street

    by jlanza29 Written May 21, 2011

    Part of the fun of visiting Narita City is its store lined approach, the Omotesando. Stretching over the entire one kilometer distance from the railway stations to the temple, Naritasan's Omotesando is a lively street lined by numerous restaurants and stores, that have been selling traditional crafts, foods and souvenirs to pilgrims and tourists for centuries.

    We ended up eating and buying some souvenirs here.

    We had the whole place to ourselves !!!!

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    Nartiasan Shinshoji Temple

    by jlanza29 Written May 21, 2011

    Naritasan (Naritasan Shinshoji Temple) is a large and highly popular Buddhist temple complex in Narita City, not far from Narita Airport. It is a great site to visit if you have three or more hours to spend around the airport and wish to catch a glimpse of historic Japan.

    Naritasan was built in the year 940 around its main sacred object of worship, a statue of the Buddhist Fudo Myoo deity. Kobo Daishi, the founder of the Shingon Sect and one of the most important figures in Japan's religious history, is said to have carved the statue.

    I'm not sure if this is a UNESCO World Hertiage site, but if it's not it should be !!!!

    Beautiful and peaceful !!!!

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    Unagi ... this is the place for it !!!!

    by jlanza29 Written May 21, 2011

    One of the things I read about Narita City is that they specialize in Unagi ... eel ... I had never had it .... so we found a place along the main street on the way back from the temples that offered fresh Unagi. And when I mean fresh, I mean they grab it, open it up, clean it out, slice it for you and put it on an open flame grill. Within 10 minutes your eating it !!!! and then wow !!!! I had never had it but all I can say it's one of the most delicious things I have ever eaten anywhere !!!! It cost 1000 yens for a skewer. We had 3 skewers each and a glass of sake !!! and it was a lot better than eating at the airport. And again trying to show support to our Japanese friends by spending some money in town. Well worth it !!!!!

    Can't get any fresher !!!!

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  • Naritasan Park

    by TravelWolf Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    If you're in the Narita area and are looking for something to do, but don't want to spend too much money....Take a trip to Naritasan Park! Frankly the park is less crowded the the parks in Tokyo, but has just as much to see. The Naritasan Shinsho temple is not only beautiful, but also as large as the temple in Asakusa, but without the long travel time and the crowds. I found lots of good advice at www.geocities.com/rc_blom/Narita.html so if you are looking for some quick information about the area you should visit that sight. In anycase, if you only have a short time in Japan, such as a layover, skip Asakusa and visit Narita Park.

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    Take a stroll around Narita town

    by Wild_Orchid Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    I highly recommend that you take a stroll around Narita town. It is a very quiet and pleasant little town, one that is easy to get around and it is practically impossible to get lost. There are only a few main streets, lined with people's houses, a few shops, numerous restaurants and a few inns/ryokans.

    Right in the centre were a few streets (Nishisando, Omotesando and Shinsando Street) meet there was a statue of a lady with a plaque (possibly the Sekitei monument?), but since I can't read Japanese, I can't be sure who the lady is (see pics). There is the Narita Kankokan (Narita Tourist Pavillion) building with a small park across the road. It was in early spring so the the leaves were showing their crimson beauty (see pics).

    I was unable to visit the tourist pavillion as it was already closed but I understand that on Thursdays from 10.30 am, they conduct tea ceremonies for visitors. On other days, you may visit to gather information about the region and particularly about the Gion Festival when there are large scale parades being held (VT member dennisKL has pictures on this festival)

    Statue at the centre of town Park in front of the Narita Tourist Information Pa Centre of town
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    O-chochin-the Red Lantern

    by Wild_Orchid Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    At the Naritasan Temple entrance, there is a large red lantern hanging at the Niomon Gate, with an inscription in large Japanese characters in black ink. You are probably wondering what the inscription says. I fully expected it to be the name of the temple or one of the important temple deities.

    Well, I found the answer after my trip, on an internet search. What do you know, it was totally unexpected, but the answer is - Fish Market- . Apparently, since the Edo period, it has been a tradition of the fish market to contribute the lantern to the Naritasan Temple. The current lantern was donated by the Fish Market in 1968.

    Red Lantern
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    Airplane Museum

    by flynboxes Written Oct 24, 2010

    Got time to kill and don't want to shop? The Museum of Aeronautical Sciences is about a 10 min ride from the airport...visit the museum website or go to the airport information desk for info on a shuttle so you can avoid the cab fare. Admission is 500 yen for adults and 300 for teenagers. I did not make it in here due to time constraints but flew over it on the way in. They have about 20 planes outside to look at and much more stuff inside including a restaurants and observation room to relax in and watch planes come and go. Like what you see here..you can also visit the museum shop in the cnetral wing of terminal 1 to bring a toy back for the kids.

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