Matsuyama Things to Do

  • Outer fortifications, Matsuyama Castle
    Outer fortifications, Matsuyama Castle
    by SallyM
  • Ninomaru Garden
    Ninomaru Garden
    by Rabbityama
  • Ninomaru Garden
    Ninomaru Garden
    by Rabbityama

Most Recent Things to Do in Matsuyama

  • bennieofzo's Profile Photo

    Matsuyama-jo

    by bennieofzo Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The Matsuyama-jo is a very beautiful castle .
    The castle was built in 1603, by the head of the Matsudeira-clan, and later destroyed by fire.
    The view over Matsuyama from the castle grounds is very beautiful.

    Take also a look at the surrounding park.

    Matsuyama-jo
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

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    The Russian Cemetery

    by dlandt Updated Sep 5, 2010

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    Visiting Shikoku every few years has made me come to the realization that Shikoku I not just remote and unconnected to the world, but it is also remote and not very well connected to Japan. For this reason, it is always interesting to come across some tangible trace of historical contact with the west. Obscure historical figures can seem very large here, like DeMoraes the Portuguese mariner cum diplomat cum lexicologist.That's why when I was in Matsuyama I was drawn to the Russian cemetery.

    Like Deutsche Village of WWI in Tokushima-ken, the Russian Cemetery is a legacy of an earlier war, in this case the Russo-Japanese war of 1905. Some 4000 Russian prisoners were brought to Shikoku and ninety-eight remained, interred as a single unit. Like the Germans prisoners of WWI, the Russian officers reported themselves and their men as being well cared for, with cordial and friendly relationships with the local population. Given the high survival rate after a rigorous campaign in East Asia, I find this easy to believe since at least some of the Russian prisoners had to have arrived sick or wounded.

    In addition to the Russians, there are two American navy fliers who crashed nearby and died late in the war. Their remains are unidentified. There is also a man named Arther Lauenstein who died in 1916, but I have no information regarding his life or death.

    It is hard to say what I felt when I looked on the neat rows of well tended graves with Orthodox crosses and stars of David. It was like some small part of my world had been transposed onto the alien kanji-scape of Shikoku, irrefutable proof that Livingston had indeed passed this way up the river if you will.

    The plaque reads as follows:

    There are graves of 98 Russian warriors there that took part in Russo-Japanese war of 1904-1905 and foundan eternal rest in Matsuyama. This cemetery is looked after by the local Elderly People Society, Women`s Association and Katsuyama (different city?) School Pupils` Council. As a sign of gratitude for such noble gesture Russian writer V Guzanov suggested putting a monument at the cemetery. It was decided to be the one of the 1st rank captain V A Boysman who offered moral support to Russian warriors. Thanks to Russians E and N Zhukov, A Zhirov, V Kirin and artist V Mukhachev it was possible to create this monument and present it to Matsuyama citizens. It was accepted with gratitude as a symbol of Japanese-Russian friendship and was placed at the Russian cemetery with the help of many citizens. October 1994. V A Boysman monument placement committee.

    Graves, well tended and neat Arthur Lauenstein and two unidentified US Navy men Bust of the former Russian commander Dedication in Russian and Japanese The graves different angle
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

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  • dlandt's Profile Photo

    Matsuyama Castle

    by dlandt Written Aug 22, 2010

    If there is one thing pretty much every visitor to Matsuyama will do it is visit the castle. Named "Matsuyama-jo", this castle survived the war because it was no longer in use as a muster point or administrative hub. You get spectacular views of the city as well as close up look at what was once the imperial stronghold in the area.

    Hving been to many castles in Europe, the Middle East and even the Caribbean, I'm always impressed by the beauty of their Japanese counterparts. Unlike our castles, which were built to control strategic points or assets, Japanese castles were relly the seat of imperial power in their region. Their purpose was less to defend the are and more to project imperial power into the region. Thus, they decorated as a means to impress as much as to oppress.

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel

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  • salisbury3933's Profile Photo

    The Ropeway

    by salisbury3933 Written Jan 5, 2008

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    It's easy enough to walk up the hill to the castle of course, that is if you are reasonably fit, but equally as fun to get the ropeway up.

    260 yen one-way. At the end of Okaido, cross over and walk up the well signposted road to the ropeway station.

    Ropeway up the mountain

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  • salisbury3933's Profile Photo

    Okaido and Gintengai

    by salisbury3933 Written Jan 5, 2008

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    These are the two shopping arcades in the centre. Plenty of people watching, and in Okaido and surrounding streets there are plenty of bars, cafes and restaurants.

    Can't comment on the shopping though!

    Gintengai

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  • salisbury3933's Profile Photo

    Dogo Park

    by salisbury3933 Written Jan 5, 2008

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    Just down the road from Dogo Onsen is Dogo Park. It's a nice place to relax, or to wander about. You'll see people with picnic lunches and so on.

    It's particularly popular during cherry blossom season, but a relaxing place at any time.

    Dogo Park

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  • salisbury3933's Profile Photo

    Ferris Wheel

    by salisbury3933 Written Jul 22, 2007

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    On top of Takashimaya department store, there is a ferris wheel. if you visit the beer garden there they'll usually give you a discount ticket to ride for 100 yen, but if you want to get a good overview of the city it's worth having a look at any time.

    Ferris wheel at night

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  • salisbury3933's Profile Photo

    Sogo Park

    by salisbury3933 Written Aug 5, 2006

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    This place is marginally interesting, with the small replica European style castle, and grounds that you can freely walk around in. It's not a bad place to go an chill out and get some views of the city.

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  • RoseAmano's Profile Photo

    3,000 Year Old Spa

    by RoseAmano Written May 26, 2006

    Soseki Natsume (the guy on the old 1,000 yen bill; since 2003 or 2004 they replaced all the luminaries on the handbills) authored a book called "Botchan", a story about an angry young man from urban Edo on his first teaching assignment in a rural area - this brooding new graduate seemed to have found at least some solace in his daily excursion to this bathhouse. The author Soseki himself actually spent a year in this area on his first teaching assignment post graduation...

    There are four levels of bathing options:
    1) Usual "Sento" Public Bath
    2) Bathing with Rental Towel and Yukata, and Tea with large public relaxation tatami room
    3) Same as 2), but with a different bath and price
    4) Private Resting Room with all the amenities, including a tour of a special room of the spa exclusively perused by Emperor Showa in the 1950's.

    Simple Alkaline (Hypotonic Alkaline) Spa
    Temperature is about 42 degrees C, pH 9.0, Radon Content 1.49 mache/kg
    (spa mineral components abstracted from http:// www.chaharu.com/data/kounou/)

    Dogo Onsen Spa - 3,000 year history Smooth skin and certainly resting after Hot Bath Early 20th century lamppost design Steep staircase in Dogo Onsen Spa Bldg.
    Related to:
    • Spa and Resort
    • Historical Travel

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  • salisbury3933's Profile Photo

    A quiet little garden

    by salisbury3933 Written Feb 6, 2006

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    There is a quiet little garden at the foot of Matsuyama castle that is not a bad place to relax. It's about 100 yen. To get there from Matsuyama castle, just walk down the hill on the opposite side from the ropeway to the castle, and you'll find it. Will post some photos once I find them.

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    Oku Dogo

    by salisbury3933 Written Jan 27, 2006

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    Just up the road from Dogo is Oku Dogo, where there is a hotel, which not only has a good buffet restaurant and summer beer garden, but an onsen as well, with various kinds of baths. It's fun to have a few beers and then head outside to have a bath.

    I enjoyed my visit, although it was soured by a racist local who didn't like the idea of sharing a large bath with a non-Japanese.

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    The Dogo Area

    by salisbury3933 Written Jan 27, 2006

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    The Dogo area is well worth a look for a number of reasons.

    You can take a bath on the famous onsen, there are plenty of souvenir stores to have a look at, there's a delightful little clock that plays out the 'Bocchan and Madonna' (famous Matsuyama story) story on the hour, and Dogo station itself is worth having a glimpse at as well.

    Dogo Onsen Dogo Station Clock tower at Dogo

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  • Ines28's Profile Photo

    Dogo Park

    by Ines28 Written Jun 5, 2005

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    This beautiful park is especially enchanting in spring, when the cherry trees are in full bloom. Small stone bridges, water and beautifully shaped trees - this idyllic picture is only disturbed by the blue plastic blankets the park authority spreads under the cherry trees in spring time, when whole japanese families come to celebrate the cherry blossom. There are food stalls where you can buy snacks, soft drinks and alcohol, and you can even rent a barbecue! So in the afternoon the peaceful park becomes a very popular and loud hang-out place, but the atmosphere is great!

    Dogo Park
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    • Arts and Culture

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    Botchan Karakuri Clock

    by Ines28 Written Jun 5, 2005

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    Erected in the Hojoen Square in front of Dogo Onsen Station, the Karakuri Clock features lovely little figures reenacting a scene from the novel "Botchan" every hour from 8am to 10 pm.
    This can be best admired while bathing your feet in the hot foot bath! :-)

    Botchan Clock tower
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Spa and Resort
    • Arts and Culture

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  • Ines28's Profile Photo

    Foot Bath at Dogo Onsen

    by Ines28 Written Jun 5, 2005

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    If you don't want (or dare) to take a "real" bath at the Dogo Onsen Honkan, at least give your tired feet a rest and dip them in the Foot Bath at Hojoen Square. The hot water that is spewed from a Meiji Era iron pot is unbelievably relaxing!!

    Foot Bath
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    • Arts and Culture
    • Spa and Resort

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Matsuyama Things to Do

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