Fuji-Hakone-Izu-kokuritsu-koen Local Customs

  • Going to Kuzuryu Shrine, Japan
    Going to Kuzuryu Shrine, Japan
    by victorwkf
  • Local Customs
    by victorwkf
  • Local Customs
    by victorwkf

Most Recent Local Customs in Fuji-Hakone-Izu-kokuritsu-koen

  • Gili_S's Profile Photo

    For your fortune

    by Gili_S Written Jan 9, 2010

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    I haven't really investigated about this but it seems that ringing the bell of this monument and taking photos in the front of it with the view of mount Fuji should be good for your fortune, especially in your love life ;-)

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    Visit to Kuzuryu Shrine (Part 5)

    by victorwkf Written Feb 9, 2007

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    Queuing up at Kuzuryu Shrine, Japan
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    After going through the rituals at the 2 main shrines, the women will then queue up and get a slip of paper from a counter which will tell them their fortunes related to love and marriage. Once this is done, they will proceed back to the Kuzuryu Shrine boat jetty to take the boat back to Moto-hakone town. The boat leaves at about 12.30pm, which gives people enough time to visit another small shrine (this one is white in colour, rather than the normal ones which are red) near to the boat jetty. Also, there is also time to explore the beautiful landscape of the surrounding areas, which is very beautiful and colourful during autumn (best time is around early to mid-November). This will be the end of the entire trip which normal lasts for about 4 hours (9.30am to 1.30pm).

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Singles
    • Women's Travel

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    Visit to Kuzuryu Shrine (Part 4)

    by victorwkf Written Feb 9, 2007

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    Kuzuryu Shrine, Japan
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    After going through the ritual mentioned at part 3 at the main shrine, the people will then proceed to queue up in front of a smaller shrine near to the lake and repeat the same ritual of ringing the bell, praying and then dropping some money into the container. This is then followed by going to the shore of Lake Ashi where they will scatter some rice into the water (maybe as a gift to the dragon). Once this is over, they will wash their hands at a traditional washing point with the carving of a dragon on it (see photos). Proceed to part 5 .....

    Related to:
    • Women's Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Arts and Culture

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    Visit to Kuzuryu Shrine (Part 3)

    by victorwkf Written Feb 9, 2007

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    Kuzuryu Shrine, Japan
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    Once the priests have finished their chanting, the women will line up in 2 rows and go up to the shrine. They will first ring the bell tied to a rope, then go through the praying ritual of clapping their hands and bowing for a few times, and then finally dropping some money into a container. Before this, each person will be given a slip of paper for them to write their personal particulars and their wish, which they will put in an envelope together with some money before handing to the shrine (see photos). Proceed to part 4 .....

    Related to:
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    • Religious Travel
    • Arts and Culture

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    Visit to Kuzuryu Shrine (Part 2)

    by victorwkf Written Feb 9, 2007
    Kuzuryu Shrine, Japan
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    Once we reached the boat jetty of Kuzuryu Shrine, there is a well laid path which brings us to the Kuzuryu Shrine (about 10 minutes leisure walk). The shrine is actually quite small and it is built near to the banks of Lake Ashi surrounded by trees which are very beautiful during autumn. Once everyone is gathered around the shrine, the priests will start to go some chanting which last for quite long while the people stand still and wait. The more privileged people get to stand on the shrine while the others stand below it (see photos). Proceed to part 3 .....

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    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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    Visit to Kuzuryu Shrine (Part 1)

    by victorwkf Written Feb 9, 2007

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    Going to Kuzuryu Shrine, Japan
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    Kuzuryu Shrine (Nine-headed dragon shrine) is famous in Japan for finding love for women. During the 13th of each month, women from all over Japan will come to the town of Moto-hakone along Lake Ashi to take a boat trip to this shrine to be blessed so that they can find their love. During 13th November 2006, I was given a rare opportunity to visit this shrine and experience the entire process when the manager of my pension in Moto-hakone asked a few Japanese women going to this shrine to bring me along. Firstly, there is only one boat leaving from Moto-hakone to the shrine and back. It starts around 9.30am at Moto-hakone jetty and you must be prepared for a huge crowd. The boat will sail along the beautiful Lake Ashi before finally reaching the jetty of the shrine about 30 minutes later (see photos). Please proceed to part 2 .....

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

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  • Pavlik_NL's Profile Photo

    About Mount Fuji as being a...

    by Pavlik_NL Written Oct 15, 2002

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    About Mount Fuji as being a pelgrimage-place. Most Japanese have the urge to (at least) once in their life climb to the top of Fuji-san. As it is a holy mountain, one can bring this urge in contact with the (natural) Shinto-religion. Yearly thousands and thousands walk the way up, which sadly enough didn't have a good effect on the natural environment of the Fuji-sloops. The climb goes through a rocky wasteland and cannot be considered very scenic (except for occasional wide views). Once the roads used to be buried under the cheap sandals and slippers that the pelgrims used up during the climb. Now-a-days it's more modern mess that lies around. So - as being a tourist - think before climbing to the top.

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    Japanese language.

    by Sharrie Written Aug 25, 2002

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    Japanese language is one of the most complicated! Three types of characters. Anyway, here's some useful phrases to keep in mind in case you need help.

    IN AN EMERGENCY:Help! Tas'kete!
    Stop! Tomete!
    Fire! Kaji!
    Call the police Keisatsu o yonde kudasai!

    Useful Phrases:

    Yes Hai
    No Ie
    Thank you Arigato gozaimasu
    Please Dozo
    Sorry Sumimasen
    Excuse Me Sumimasen
    I don't understand Wakarimasen
    Do you speak English? Eigo o hanashimasuka?
    How are you? Ogenki desu ka ?
    Good morning Ohayo gozaimasu
    Good afternoon Konnichiwa
    Good evening Konbanwa
    Good night Oyasumi nasai
    Good bye Sayonara

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Fuji-Hakone-Izu-kokuritsu-koen Local Customs

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