Hiroshima Favorites

  • Miyajima Pale Ale
    Miyajima Pale Ale
    by Ewingjr98
  • Miyajima Pale Ale
    Miyajima Pale Ale
    by Ewingjr98
  • Miyajima Pale Ale
    Miyajima Pale Ale
    by Ewingjr98

Most Recent Favorites in Hiroshima

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    Hiroshima Cola

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Dec 23, 2014

    Favorite thing: Hiroshima Cola is produced by Hiroshima's Saito Drink Industry Co. This cola drink is unique due to the inclusion of the slightly bitter hassaku citrus fruit. The hassaku (はっさく) is a fruit that resembles a large orange and has a sweet, bitter flavor. In Japan, citrus is grown from mid-Honshu south to Okinawa.

    The drink is good, with just a hint of citrus.

    The label says, "A drink to make Hiroshima fresh up"!

    Address: 5-7-6, Kitahonjo, Fukuyama-shi, Hiroshima

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    Doppo White Beer for Oyster

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Dec 22, 2014

    Favorite thing: Okayama Doppo Beer's "White Beer for Oyster" is made in Okayama, but it is a natural fit in Hiroshima, where oysters are so common. The uniquely and specifically named beer comes in a brown bottle with a white label that says only "Doppo," "Since 1995," "The Pioneer of Japanese Microbrewery," and "White Beer for Oyster" in English. I'm assuming the beer is intended for people to consume while eating oyster, not for feeding to the delicious farm-raised oysters of the area around Hiroshima. In Europe oysters are often paired with dry white wine, so the Doppo Brewery decided to try pairing oysters with dry white beer.

    The light, white beer is a wheat beer, with a richness and acidity that really does pair well with grilled oysters. Not a bad beer.

    3.5 out of 5 stars.

    Okayama Doppo Beer is from Okayama Prefecture, and it is made by the Miyashita Sake Brewery. The sake business was started in 1915, and this company began making beer in 1995, as one of Japan's first craft beer brewers.

    Address: 184 Nishigawara, Okayama-shi, Okayama, Japan 703-8258
    Telephone: +81-86-272-5594
    Website: http://www.optic.or.jp/navi_company/com/p/e_company_detail/index/1156.html

    Beer for Oyster! Doppo Weizen Doppo Beer Beer for Oyster Doppo Dunkel

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    Miyajima Beer Itsukushima Ginger Beer

    by Ewingjr98 Written Dec 22, 2014

    Favorite thing: Miyajima Beer Itsukushima Ginger Beer is , according to Untappd,brewed by Miyajima Beer. During a visit to Miyajima in November 2014, I found and tasted this unique beer. Itsukushima Ginger comes in a bottle with a cartoon of the torii gate of Miyajima. This is a very good beer brewed with ginger.

    The Miyajima label beers are contracted to two other Japanese breweries to produce: the Chitei Ryoko Brewery in Osaka and Niigata Beer in Niigata. This beer company was established in 2010, and they offer mostly German style beers including dunkel, pilsner, weizen, kolsch, weizenbock, and pale ale.

    4 out of 5 stars.

    Address: 459-2 Miyajima-cho, Hatsukaichi-shi, Hiroshima Prefecture, Japan
    Website: http://www.miyajima-beer.com/
    Telephone: 080-3401-3984

    Itsukushima Ginger Itsukushima Ginger Miyajima Caramel Blond Miyajima Pale Ale Miyajima Pilsner

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    Miyajima Beer Pilsner

    by Ewingjr98 Written Dec 22, 2014

    Favorite thing: During a recent visit to Miyajima, I found Miyajima Brewery's Pilsner. The beer comes in a bottle featuring the fall leaves of Miyajma over an orange flash where the beer style is printed. I drank this beer from the bottle, so I didn't see the color of the beer beer or head, but the beer itself was a good crisp pilsner with hints of wheat and a sharp, hoppy finish. After the Caramel Blond, this was my favorite beer from Miyajima.

    The Miyajima label beers are contracted to two other Japanese breweries to produce: the Chitei Ryoko Brewery in Osaka and Niigata Beer in Niigata. This beer company was established in 2010, and they offer mostly German style beers including dunkel, pilsner, weizen, kolsch, weizenbock, and pale ale.

    3.5 out of 5 stars.

    Address: 459-2 Miyajima-cho, Hatsukaichi-shi, Hiroshima Prefecture, Japan
    Website: http://www.miyajima-beer.com/
    Telephone: 080-3401-3984

    Miyajima Pilsner Miyajima Pale Ale Miyajima Caramel Blond Miyajima Caramel Blond Miyajima Pale Ale

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    Miyajima Beer Pale Ale

    by Ewingjr98 Written Dec 21, 2014

    Favorite thing: During a recent visit to Miyajima, I found Miyajima Brewery's Pale Ale, a rather bland, unimpressive beer. The beer comes in a bottle with the standard label of the Miyajima Shrine's torii gate. I drank this beer from the bottle, so I didn't get a look at the beer, but it was oddly flavored, with hints of sweet syrup, grass, fruit and other flavors that shouldn't be mixed . Easily my least favorite beer of the five I had in Miyajima.

    The Miyajima label beers are contracted to two other Japanese breweries to produce: the Chitei Ryoko Brewery in Osaka and Niigata Beer in Niigata. This beer company was established in 2010, and they offer mostly German style beers including dunkel, pilsner, weizen, kolsch, weizenbock, and pale ale.

    2 out of 5 stars.

    Address: 459-2 Miyajima-cho, Hatsukaichi-shi, Hiroshima Prefecture, Japan
    Website: http://www.miyajima-beer.com/
    Telephone: 080-3401-3984

    Miyajima Pale Ale Miyajima Pale Ale Miyajima Pale Ale Miyajima Caramel Blond Miyajima Pilsner

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    Miyajima Beer Caramel Blond

    by Ewingjr98 Written Dec 21, 2014

    Favorite thing: Miyajima Beer Caramel Blond is a smooth easy drinking beer from Miyajima Brewery. The Miyajima label beers are contracted to two other Japanese breweries to produce: the Chitei Ryoko Brewery in Osaka and Niigata Beer in Niigata. This beer company was established in 2010, and they offer mostly German style beers including dunkel, pilsner, weizen, kolsch, weizenbock, and pale ale.

    During a recent visit to Miyajima, I found the Caramel Blond. This seems to be a relatively new beer for this brewery, since it hasn't even been listed on RateBeer.com as of December 2014. The beer comes in a bottle with the standard label of the Miyajima Shrine's torii gate, and it also seems to be the only variety of Miyajima Beer that is sold in cans. I drank this beer from the bottle, so I didn't get a look at the beer, but it was smooth and slightly sweet. A very refreshing, drinkable beer. Also my favorite of the three Miyajima Beers I tried during this visit.

    4 out of 5 stars.

    Address: 459-2 Miyajima-cho, Hatsukaichi-shi, Hiroshima Prefecture, Japan
    Website: http://www.miyajima-beer.com/
    Telephone: 080-3401-3984

    Miyajima Caramel Blond Miyajima Caramel Blond Miyajima Caramel Blond Miyajima Pale Ale Miyajima Pilsner

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    Kure Beer's Alt

    by Ewingjr98 Written Dec 11, 2014

    Favorite thing: Kure Beer, also called Kaigun Bakushu (kaigun means "navy" and bakushu, or 麦酒, is kanji for "beer"). All of this company's beers feature a bold black label with a red and white rising sun flag next to a Japanese navy ship. The caps on this line of beer are black pull tabs with a large anchor. The company offers four main German-style beers: weizen, alt, pilsner, and kolsch.

    I bought the alt at an impressive liquor and beer store in central Hiroshima. I drank the beer straight from the bottle while riding the shinkansen to Himeji, so I didn't get a look at the beer itself. The beer had a good bitter sweetness throughout with some roasted hops at the finish. Tasty!

    The best of the four Kure Beers I had!

    4.5 out of 5 stars.

    Website: http://www.kurebeer.com
    Address: 1-1-2 Naka Dori, Kure, Hiroshima-ken, Japan 737-0046
    Telephone: 082-326-9091

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    Kure Beer's Pilsner

    by Ewingjr98 Written Dec 11, 2014

    Favorite thing: Kure Beer, also called Kaigun Bakushu (kagun means "navy" and bakushu, or 麦酒, is kanji for "beer"). All of this company's beers feature a bold black label with a red and white rising sun flag next to a Japanese navy ship. The caps on this line of beer are black pull tabs with a large anchor. The company offers four main German-style beers: weizen, alt, pilsner, and kolsch.

    I bought the pilsner at an impressive liquor and beer store in central Hiroshima. I drank the beer straight from the bottle at a small park near Tadanoumi Station, so I didn't get a look at the beer itself. The smell was mild, slightly sweet. The taste was good from start to finish, light but good.

    Smooth, refreshing, and good.

    4 out of 5 stars.

    Website: http://www.kurebeer.com
    Address: 1-1-2 Naka Dori, Kure, Hiroshima-ken, Japan 737-0046
    Telephone: 082-326-9091

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    Kure Beer's Kolsch

    by Ewingjr98 Written Dec 11, 2014

    Favorite thing: Kure Beer, also called Kaigun Bakushu (kagun means "navy" and bakushu, or 麦酒, is kanji for "beer"). All of this company's beers feature a bold black label with a red and white rising sun flag next to a Japanese navy ship. The caps on this line of beer are black pull tabs with a large anchor. The company offers four main German-style beers: weizen, alt, pilsner, and kolsch.

    I bought the kolsch at an impressive liquor and beer store in central Hiroshima. I drank the beer straight from the bottle at a small park near Tadanoumi Station, so I didn't get a look at the beer itself. Judging from the look of the light coming through the beer and the bottle, it looks to be a lighter, perhaps hazy beer. The initial smell was slightly skunky, The skunky taste went away as the beer warmed, but it maintained a bitter metallic flavor throughout.

    Very mildly skunky, annoyingly metallic beer.

    3 out of 5 stars.

    Website: http://www.kurebeer.com
    Address: 1-1-2 Naka Dori, Kure, Hiroshima-ken, Japan 737-0046
    Telephone: 082-326-9091

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    Kure Beer's Weizen

    by Ewingjr98 Written Dec 11, 2014

    Favorite thing: Kure Beer, also called Kaigun Bakushu (kagun means "navy" and bakushu, or 麦酒, is kanji for "beer"). All of this company's beers feature a bold black label with a red and white rising sun flag next to a Japanese navy ship. The caps on this line of beer are black pull tabs with a large anchor. The company offers four main German-style beers: weizen, alt, pilsner, and kolsch.

    I bought the weizen at an impressive liquor and beer store in central Hiroshima. The beer, purchased in a bottle, poured a light golden color, perhaps a bit hazy, with thin head. The initial smell is mildly clovey with hints of banana. Very mild taste, with slight carbonation. Not a great weizen, but a smooth, easy drinking beer.

    3.5 out of 5 stars.

    Website: http://www.kurebeer.com
    Address: 1-1-2 Naka Dori, Kure, Hiroshima-ken, Japan 737-0046
    Telephone: 082-326-9091

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  • salisbury3933's Profile Photo

    Local Specialty

    by salisbury3933 Written Sep 11, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Hiroshima style okonomiyaki is a real specialty of this region, and restaurants are everywhere in Hiroshima, with one area 'okonomiyaki mura' being devoted to this particular food. Definitely worth a try if you are in town.

    In Hiroshima, the ingredients are layered rather than mixed. The layers are typically batter, cabbage, pork, and optional items such as squid, octopus, and cheese. Noodles (yakisoba, udon) are also used as a topping with fried egg and a generous amount of okonomiyaki sauce.

    The amount of cabbage used is usually three to four times the amount used in the more common Osaka style. It starts out piled very high and is pushed down as the cabbage cooks. The order of the layers may vary slightly depending on the chef's style and preference, and ingredients vary depending on the preference of the customer. This style is also called Hiroshima-yaki or Hiroshima-okonomi.

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    Some history

    by toonsarah Written Dec 11, 2013

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: This is of course not my "favourite thing" about Hiroshima, but until VT provides a tip category for general information about a destination I see no alternative but to place this one here.

    Before you start to look round the Peace Memorial Park it is as well to know something about what happened here on Monday 6th August 1945. You can do that very effectively through a visit to the excellent museum, but that lies at the far end of the park, so if starting at this end (as we and many other visitors do), it’s good to have read a bit beforehand.

    Of course Hiroshima has a history that stretches back for centuries, and if you’re spending any time here and exploring all over the city it would be as well to appreciate that. But the dropping of the atom bomb was an apocalyptic event and understandably tends to dominate any account of the past, and thus the more gentle evolution of a city and its people is obscured.

    One thing that fascinated me as I read the accounts in the museum’s displays was the almost random manner in which Hiroshima met its fate. Firstly, the Allies could have chosen to use the atom bomb against Germany, as they had developed the technology in time. But they rejected the idea, believing that should things go wrong and it not detonate, the Germans had sufficiently advanced skills to quickly learn from the bomb and develop their own to be turned against the Allies. So Japan it was.

    Secondly, they could have opted not to use it at all. Several leading scientists of the day argued unsuccessfully that merely having (and demonstrating that they had) the capacity to build and use atomic weapons would be enough to ensure US post-war supremacy, and that indeed using the bomb would restrict that supremacy as it would speed up its acquisition by other powers. But they were not listened to.

    Thirdly, there was an initial long-list of 17 Japanese cities, and then a short-list of four, and Hiroshima and Nagasaki (where the second bomb was dropped) were just two on this list. The criteria for the list included factors such as not having any prisoner of war facilities (the Allies didn’t want to bomb their own people), plus of course being of some strategic importance (a significant number of troops were stationed in Hiroshima and its port was one of the most important in the country). Also, to some extent the dropping of the bomb was an experiment by the Allies; they didn’t know exactly what impact it would have. So to ensure that the effects could be accurately observed, potential target cities had to have an urban area at least three miles in diameter (about 4.8 kilometres). Interestingly, at one point Kyoto was apparently considered as a possible target, but the wife of a senior US general reminded him of the wonderful honeymoon they had spent there and pleaded that its temples should be spared, so they were. Finally, they had a shortlist of four: Hiroshima, Kokura, Niigata, and Nagasaki.

    But in the end it all came down to weather. On the morning of 6th August 1945 the skies were clear over Hiroshima, so Hiroshima it was. The Peace Memorial Museum website describes what happened:
    ”The bombardier was ordered to conduct a visual bombing, the most reliable method at the time. Before dawn on August 6, weather reconnaissance planes took off for Hiroshima, Kokura, and Nagasaki from Tinian, Mariana Islands. Three B29s took off later: the Enola Gay carrying the atomic bomb, a second bomber carrying scientific observation equipment, and a third with photographic equipment. Receiving the report that the sky over the primary target was clear, the Enola Gay headed straight for Hiroshima. The aiming point was the T-shaped Aioi Bridge in the central part of the city. At 8:15 a.m. on August 6, the atomic bomb was dropped and detonated approximately 600 meters over the Shima Hospital, located about 300 meters southeast of the Aioi Bridge.”

    The bomb killed an estimated 80,000 people instantly. It flattened an area of five square miles (13 square kilometres) and destroyed about 69% of the city's buildings were completely destroyed, with another 7% severely damaged. Three days later the second bomb was dropped on Nagasaki, and five days after that, Japan surrendered.

    But of course the effects of the bomb were much longer term, with estimates suggesting that the final death toll was about 140,000, (out of a population of about 350,000), including those who died later from radiation. Many also suffered long-term sickness and disability as a result of the bomb’s radiation effects. Hiroshima would never be the same again.

    Yet like a phoenix rising from the ashes it has succeeded in reinventing itself as a modern city that pays tribute to its past in the best possible way – using those terrible events as a platform from which to campaign for peace. Its memorial park and museum are not “Bomb Memorials” but “Peace Memorials” and this ethos pervades everything you see will here and the people, especially children, whom you will meet.

    However there is one stark exception to this focus on looking forwards, and that is the Atomic Bomb Dome

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

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    Meeting Japanese children

    by toonsarah Written Dec 11, 2013

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Unsurprisingly, the story of what happened in Hiroshima seems to be on the curriculum in every Japanese school, and the children are taught through this story, and in particular that of Sadako Sasaki, to work for peace and a non-nuclear world (perhaps somewhat ironically given recent events at Fukushima). It also seems that every class in the country is brought at some point to see Hiroshima for themselves and to learn about the devastation of war in the hope that they would grow up determined never to allow another “Hiroshima” to happen. Or so it appears, judging by the number that were there on the day we visited! But although this made the park, and the museum in particular, more crowded, it also provided us with many lighter moments to contrast with the sombre nature of the sights here.

    Fondest memory: We quickly discovered that their teachers, no doubt keen to extract as much learning from the day as possible, had briefed them to practice their English by talking to Western tourists. We had not been in the park very long before a group of three girls approached us and asked, in hesitant English, if they might ask us a few questions. We naturally agreed and, armed with a clip-board and a work-book with a set of these questions, the girls proceeded to “interview” us. They were to be the first of many! Our progress through the park was regularly interrupted as group after group spotted us, hurtled towards us, paused, maybe giggled or nudged each other, and then began: “Excuse me, may we ask you some questions?”, spoken in chorus and with mixed level of English, from the reasonable to the almost non-existent. On one occasion there were even two such groups fighting over us!

    After each interview we might be asked to write something in their work-books – our names, where we lived, and in one, our message for peace. They posed for photos for us, and asked us to pose with them. And often there were gifts – a paper crane, a hand-made bookmark, a photo of their school. I think we must have given about ten of these “interviews”, but I have to confess that in the end we did tire of them a little and learned to take a circuitous route around the classes we saw ahead of us. Not that the experience of meeting these kids wasn’t a special one – it was – but we had lots to see in the park and a train back to Osaka to catch at the end of the afternoon.

    But we left with their halting English voices and shy smiles as lasting memories of the positive side of Hiroshima and its efforts for world peace.

    This is my last tip; please click here to return to my intro page and leave me a comment.

    Chris being Phil's turn A school photo in the Peace Park

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    Christmas Time lights along the parkway

    by KevinMichael Written Dec 31, 2010

    Favorite thing: This was a bonus we weren't planning on. The key to it had been the location of our hotel along the parkway. We stayed there on December 27 and were surprised to find it illuminated all along the parkway. It was stupendous. It was obvious with people out and about that many others were enjoying this Christmas light display as well.

    There were lights along Hiroshima Peace park, but they weren't as decorative as the ones
    lining the hotel areas of the parkway.

    Dragon, knight & I
    Related to:
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

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    The Bombing of Hiroshima

    by pure1942 Written Sep 15, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Fondest memory: This isn't exactly a 'fondest' memory but I didn't know where else to put this info...

    In 1945, as World War drew to a close in Europe, the Japanese were still holding out in the Pacific and refusing to surrender. To bring the war to a speedy end, the US decided to use an entirely new and relatively untested weapon to pressure the Japanese into surrender. At 8.15am, on August 6, 1945, a US B29 bomber dropped the world's first atomic bomb on Hiroshima. The bomb, which was developed in New Mexico was nicknamed 'Little Boy' and targeted the Aioi Bridge in central Hiroshima. Detonating a little off target, almost directly over the present day A-Bomb Dome, at an altitude of almost 600m.
    The explosion killed tens of thousands of people instantly and claimed many more lives in the following days. Even today the fallout from the bombing is still claiming lives and further damage to the environment and health of Hiroshima's people is still not fully known.

    Whether or not the decision to drop the bomb on Hiroshima and Nagasaki was correct, is not something I am willing to discuss on VT although I do have very strong opinions on this. One thing I will say is this; after seeing what happened in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, it is clear that with far more advanced nuclear weapons present in the world, a similar incident in the future would spell disaster for the entire planet. Nuclear weapons have no place on this planet, and that means for everyone...not just Iran and North Korea!!!!! France, Russia, USA, Britain...why the hell should they be the sole possessors of nuclear weapons...EVERY country needs to call a halt to nuclear weapons development.

    'Little Boy' Model The aftermath 8.15am Bombed Building

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