Itsukushima Shrine, Miyajima

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    Itsukushima Shrine
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  • Itsukushima Shrine
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  • globetrott's Profile Photo

    Marodoharaiden ("Purification Hall")

    by globetrott Updated May 16, 2009

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Marodoharaiden ("Purification Hall") is the largest building of the shrine and to a very large part of it there is access for the tourists and from there you may watch some ceremonies or take a look at the donations that were given to the temply by local companies.
    You have to pay a small amount of money to enter the temple and they you simply follow the crowds.

    Marodoharaiden ( Marodoharaiden ( Marodoharaiden ( Marodoharaiden ( Marodoharaiden (
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    Otorii - the famous red gate

    by globetrott Updated May 16, 2009

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Otorii is the name of the famous red gate of Itsukushima Shrine and it is one of the 3 most scenic spots in Japan. We had been there in winter, and the water was high, while in low tide you will be able to walk directely to that gate. In my opinion it looks better when surrounded by water and it is hard to believe how many people are going to Miyajima every day,so it will be hard to find the perfect place to take a photo of this gate.

    the famous red gate of Itsukushima Shrine Otorii - the famous red gate in Miyajima the famous red gate of Itsukushima Shrine the famous red gate of Itsukushima Shrine the famous red gate of Itsukushima Shrine
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  • globetrott's Profile Photo

    Miyajima, where People and Gods Live Togeather

    by globetrott Updated May 10, 2009

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    The holy island of Miyajima has been worshipped as a god since more than 1400 years. In the year 593 the origins of Itsukushima Shrine was built and many other shrines and temples followed and nowadays Miyajima even became a UNESCO world cultural heritage site. The buildings of Itsukushima Shrine, that you see nowadys were constructed in 1168.

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  • bebejepang's Profile Photo

    Itsukushima Shrine-miyajima

    by bebejepang Written Aug 2, 2008

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The gate of Itsukushima Shrine is become one of the best view of Japan.

    In summer, the seashore will be dried, so you can walk until the gate.
    The shrine itself is beautiful.... especially in autumn with deers and colorful leaves.

    Itsukushima Shrine gate Itsukushima Shrine Itsukushima Shrine

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    Japan's most scenic view !

    by WStat Written Apr 24, 2008

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    Miyajima (literally "shrine island") has been celebrated as a sacred island and one of Japan's three most scenic views. It is famous for Itsukushima Shrine, which, together with its large wooden torii (gate), stands in the ocean during high tide.Deer move around the island freely, and so do monkeys on top of Misen, the island's highest mountain.
    Itsukushima Shrine gave Miyajima its name ("shrine island"). The shrine, which is partially constructed over water and features the famous floating torii gate, was first constructed in the 6th century. It later became the shrine of the most powerful local clan.
    One should try to go to the island at high-tide, when the famous Torii seems to float over the sea.

    Floating Torii at Itsukushima Srine Miyajima beach Inside Istukushima Monastery at Itsukushima Shrine Itsukushima
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  • blacksnail's Profile Photo

    Walk around the Tori

    by blacksnail Written Apr 21, 2008

    i arrived there at 4:50pm and it was low tide. the tori was dry up.. and i was able to walk towards the tori, and touch this old old (although was touched up) architecture. All the tourists were gone, and there was 1 family playing there and trying to get some crabs..

    There are deers walking around peacefully. And There was this man who brought food and prayed at one of the legs of the Tori. he prayed hard, squarting down, head down and for quite some time.

    Tori close up
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    Most photographed!

    by Zirpsis Written Jun 19, 2007

    This shinto shrine gate or torii, is probably the most photographed sight on Miyajima island. Well here you have my photos of it. This gate is 16 metres tall and standing in water (during low tide it's in mud). It's made of camphor wood which is lasting and water resistant. It was originally built in water because the island was so holy that nobody was allowed to set foot and walk there.

    They've traditionally renewed it every 100 years, approximately, so now would be about time to do that. But however, it's difficult to find large enough trees nowadays. And, moreover, all the big trees are protected! Must grow trees especially for this purpose. Wonder how long it takes for a camphor tree to grow so big? I guess about 100 years...

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    Itsukushima shrine

    by Zirpsis Updated Jun 18, 2007

    Built over water as a pier like structure, this is an extremely holy shinto shrine founded about 1400 years ago and still used for various religious rites today. It's also listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The reason why it was built in water was the holiness of the island. When nobody was allowed to set foot and walk on the island, the gate and shrine had to be built in water. But it's in water during high tide only.

    When I visited, there was a Swedish-Japanese wedding about to start. Interesting...

    From the sea
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  • kevarms's Profile Photo

    Itsukushima Shrine

    by kevarms Written Nov 11, 2006

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    A UNESCO World Heritage site, Itsukushima is an unusual shrine built on the water. The current form is over 800 years old. The gate, which appears far from shore at high tide, indicates the former holy status of the entire island. The day we visited there was a wedding which was pretty cool.

    Itsukushima Shrine
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    FLOATING TORII

    by liangel Written Mar 28, 2006

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    Walk out to the torii during low tide. I went once in the late afternoon and another time early next morning. For nicer pictures, go in the morning when the sun is shining on the torii gate, rather than from behind it. Didn't get a chance to take the gate at high tide.

    From the ferry towards the island Taken in late afternoon at low tide Taken in the morning at low tide
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  • salisbury3933's Profile Photo

    Shinto shrine

    by salisbury3933 Written Feb 1, 2006

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The shinto shrine is the main reason people visit, and the torii in the water is one of the most famous images of Japan. It's interesting to view it with both the tide in and out, which means hanging around for a wee while.

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    Itsukushima-jinja

    by Blatherwick Updated Nov 23, 2005

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    The famous "floating" gate to the island of Miyajima is a must see for any visitor in Japan. The shrine dates back to the 6th century, and has been in its present form since 1168 when funds were provided by the warlord Taira no Kiyomori. The current gate dates back to 1875. The shrine's construction, consisting of pier-like structures built over the bay, is due to the holy status that the island once commanded. Commoners were historically not allowed to set foot on the island, and had to approach by boat, entering through the gate that appears to float.

    The
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  • Intrepidduck's Profile Photo

    Miyajima: Torii gate.

    by Intrepidduck Updated Jun 19, 2004

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    One of the most stunning objects to see in all of Japan, while indeed much visited and photographed, is the floating torii (Shinto gate). Depending on the time of day it can be sarounded by mud as the tide goes out quite along way. I took advantage to get some good pics, although getting wet up to the waist, and walked through the torii and straight out some distance beyond. A most notable feature was that I was not the first to do this. Pushed into the thick timber structure were many old coins, see picture.

    Close detail of coins in torii.
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  • bennieofzo's Profile Photo

    Visit Miyajima, a small isle...

    by bennieofzo Written Aug 31, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Visit Miyajima, a small isle with a strong religic inflluence.
    It's is one of the most famous places of Japan. The Itsukushima-shrine a lot of other temples and shrines and ofcourse the O-torii (Grand Gate). And at the top of the hill a monkey-park.

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