Yokohama Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by Ewingjr98
  • Things to Do
    by Ewingjr98
  • Yamate Museum
    Yamate Museum
    by Ewingjr98

Most Recent Things to Do in Yokohama

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    Motomachi

    by Ewingjr98 Written Jul 20, 2013
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    Motomachi is a famous Yokohama shopping area located between Yamate and Chinatown, south of the Central Business District. Since the opening of Japan and the arrival of Westerners in 1859, this has been a center for Western businesses like shops and restaurants.

    Today this shopping area stretches five blocks, and it features a variety of European boutiques and restaurants.

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    America-Yama Park

    by Ewingjr98 Written Jul 20, 2013
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    America-Yama Park is a new park on Yamate Bluffs, just completed in 2009. The park was built on the site of the American diplomatic enclave during the Meiji Era. After World War II, the area of the park was a United States military garrison, until it was returned to Japan in 1971. Today the park is covered in green grass and lined with dogwood trees and roses.

    The park is easily reached from Motomachi-Chukagai Station via escalator or elevator. America-Yama Park lies between the foreigners cemetery and Harbor View Park.

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    Yokohama Kanteibyo (Guan Gong Temple)

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Jul 20, 2013
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    Yokohama Kanteibyo (Guan Gong Temple) is one of the oldest temples in Chinatown. Founded in 1862 by migrant Chinese, the temple has faced numerous calamities. It was destroyed by the 1923 Great Kanto Earthquake, then damaged heavily in World War II. Somehow this unlucky temple was struck by lightning in 1981, then it burned down in 1986.

    The present temple was completed in 2000.

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    Mazu Miao Temple, Chinatown, Yokohama

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Jul 20, 2013
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    Mazu Miao Temple was built just recently in 2006. It features amazingly realistic and elaborate concrete carvings surrounding the temple. The temple was built after a dispute when the property owner planned a major apartment complex, but the locals opposed the project and bought the land.

    The beautiful temple is free to enter.

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    Minato Mirai

    by Ewingjr98 Written Jul 20, 2013
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    Minato Mirai, officially Minato Mirai 21, is the Central Business District of Yokohama. The area began development in 1983 on what was previously an industrial area. The most prominent building is the Landmark Tower, Japan's tallest skyscraper, which was completed in 1993 and stands 972 feet high.

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    Yokohama Waterfront

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Jul 20, 2013
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    Yokohama's Waterfront is full of parks with views of the ports, cruise ship terminals, and the scenic waterfront of the city. From Harbor View Park to the south to Yamashita Park and Rinko Park in the north, the tourist area of the waterfront stretches some two miles, while the port areas go many miles farther in each direction.

    Harbor View Park is a great park in Yokohama near the historic Yakata neighborhood. This park, which opened to the public in 1962, stands at the site of a former British military barracks, and another part of the park was a French garrison. Years ago, the harbor came right up to the edge of the park, but fill has pushed the harbor off in the distance. The park's overlooks offer fantastic views of the port of Yokohama. It also has rose gardens, ruins of old western houses, an overlook park, walking paths and more.

    Yokohama's Red Brick Warehouse is a historic dockside warehouse that has been restored, renovated, and turned into a major shopping center. The two facilities were constructed by a Japanese company in 1911 and 1913, and are notable for largely surviving the 1923 Great Kantō Earthquake. The buildings also lasted through World War II and were used by the American Forces from 1945 to 1956. The buildings were used for cargo until 1989. The city of Yokohama restored the buildings from 1994 to 1999, and the modern shopping center opened in 2002.

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    Yokohama Foreign General Cemetery

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Jul 20, 2013
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    Yokohama Foreign General Cemetery was established in 1854, when one of Commodore Matthew Perry's sailors died aboard a ship in the bay. Perry requested from the Japanese government a site to bury the dead American, and he was granted a plot within Zotokuin temple in Yokohama village. This grave was later moved, but the first grave that still exists within this cemetery is that of a Russian killed in 1859. The dead in the Foreign Cemetery number about 5,000, under about 3,000 headstones.

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    Harbor View Park

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Jul 20, 2013
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    Harbor View Park (港の見える丘公園, minatonomieruokakouen) is a great park in Yokohama near the historic Yakata neighborhood. This park, which opened to the public in 1962, stands at the site of a former British military barracks, and another part of the park was a French garrison. Years ago, the harbor came right up to the edge of the park, but fill has pushed the harbor off in the distance.

    The park's overlooks offer fantastic views of the port of Yokohama. It also has rose gardens, ruins of old western houses, an overlook park, walking paths and more.

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    Yokohama Chinatown

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Jul 20, 2013
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    Yokohama's Chinatown is said to be the largest in Japan and throughout all of Asia (other than the Chinatowns in China, of course). While it may be one of the largest (depending on how you measure size), New York Daily News doesn't consider it one of the top 10 Chinatowns in the world.

    Chinatown in Yokohama began around 1859 when Yokohama's port opened for trade, and foreigners began to settle in the area. Just as Japanese laws forced the Westerners to live in Yakata, the Chinese were required to live in a small area which became today's Chinatown. This area was not officially recognized as Chinatown until 1955 when the first of

    While the number of ethnic Chinese in Yokohama's Chinatown has dwindled, the number of Chinese shops and restaurants remains huge, with about 250.

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    Yokohama's Historical Houses at Yamate Bluffs

    by Ewingjr98 Written Jul 19, 2013
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    Yokohama was just a small fishing village until American Commodore Matthew Perry arrived in 1853, then again in 1854, with a mandate to open Japan to international trade. In 1858 Yokohama was selected to be among the first five ports open to commercial trade, and the port opened in 1859. Foreigners soon followed, establishing a community in a separated part of the city no Kinnai, meaning behind the barrier. Yokohama became Japan's first city to publish a newspaper, the first to have gas lamps, and--most important--the first city to brew beer.

    The area of Western houses from the 1800s is called Yamate Bluffs. Here there are many historic Western style houses, most built after thre Great Kanto Earthquake of 1923. The houses of note include Berrick Hall, the Ehrismann Residence (built from 1925 to 1926), and Bluff No. 234. Here there is also a foreigners cemetery, many Western restaurants and international schools.

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    Red Brick Warehouse

    by Ewingjr98 Written Jul 16, 2013
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    Yokohama's Red Brick Warehouse is a historic dockside warehouse that has been restored, renovated, and turned into a major shopping center. The two facilities were constructed by a Japanese company in 1911 and 1913, and are notable for largely surviving the 1923 Great Kantō Earthquake. The buildings also lasted through World War II and were used by the American Forces from 1945 to 1956. The buildings were used for cargo until 1989. The city of Yokohama restored the buildings from 1994 to 1999, and the modern shopping center opened in 2002.

    The larger and newer of the two structures, called Building Number 2, is 149 meters long, and it has dozens of stores, numerous restaurants, a concert hall, and more. Building Number 1 is just 76 meters long, and it is used primarily for cultural events like movie exhibitions, plays, and music. The area around the buildings is also used for occasional events, like a 3-on-3 basketball tournament that took place during my visit.

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    Yokohama Stadium

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Jul 12, 2013
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    Yokohama Stadium is a multipurpose stadium built in 1978, with a capacity of 30,000 spectators. The stadium is home to the Yokohama BayStars of the Nippon Professional Baseball league. The stadium is used primarily for baseball, but it has also hosted Australian Rules Football games and numerous big concerts like Carlos Santana, Madonna, and Michael Jackson.

    Yokohama Park is situated adjacent to the stadium's northeast side. A few blocks farther east you can visit Yamashita Park on Yokohama's waterfront. The edge of Yokohama's massive Chinatown is just across the street from the stadium to the east.

    There are numerous hotels in the immediate vicinity of the stadium such as Daiwa Roynet Hotel Yokohama-Kannai.

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    Visit Kamakura

    by Ewingjr98 Written Jul 7, 2013
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    Kamakura is a city of under 200,000 people, located just 30 miles from central Tokyo. From 1185 to 1333 Kamakura was the de facto capital of Japan. During this time, known as the Kamakura Period, the shoguns, or military leaders, and their regents, or political rulers, led the country from Kamakura. The valley was a natural fortress, surround on three sides by steep mountains, and on the fourth, by the sea.

    Today, Kamakura has a number of cultural relics, a nice modern city center, and beautiful beaches. The main attractions include the famous Kamakura Daibatsu, as well as numerous temples and shrines such as Engakuji Temple, Hachimangu Shrine, and Hasedera Temple.

    Kamakura has been proposed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, but only a few artifacts are the originals. Much of the history of the area was destroyed in the Great Kanto Earthquake of 1923 and later rebuilt.

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    Great Buddha of Kamakura (Kamakura Daibutsu)

    by Ewingjr98 Written Jul 6, 2013
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    The Great Buddha of Kamakura (Kamakura Daibutsu) is Kamakura's most famous landmark. It stands 13.35 meters tall, making Daibutsu the second tallest bronze Buddha statue in Japan. Cast in 1252, and constructed of some 30 separate pieces, the statue was originally inside of Kotokuin Temple. The temple was repeatedly destroyed by storms in 1334, 1369, and 1498. The base was destroyed in the Great Kanto Earthquake in 1923, but soon replaced, and the statue's neck was strengthened in 1960-1961.

    Entry to see the Buddha is 200 Yen per person. The Buddha is impressive, but it stands alone, with no gardens, buildings, monuments or other objects of interest. Massive crowds gather around the Buddha, even in rainy weather... we even saw a group of monks from Cambodia or Thailand in the orange robes.

    Directions: The Great Buddha is about 10 minutes north of Hase Station, and it is worth stopping at Hasedera Temple on the way to the Buddha. Hase Station the third station from Kamakura along the Enoden Electric Line, and old streetcar like train system. Hase station is about 30 minutes from Yokohama Station.

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    Exploring Yakohama

    by MrG27 Updated May 10, 2013
    Spring bloom
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    Yokohama is situated approximately 1 ½ hours from Tokyo, depending on exactly where you are staying. In the Spring there are blooming flowers all over, and modern art work that is impressive. If you are pressed for time I would recommend that you skip the Foreign Cemetery, it is up a long hill, and it is rather small, not much to see there. The cemetery is situated in the Yamate District which has several Western-style homes that belonged to the European and American merchants that settled in the area, and one is allowed to visit some of the stately houses. However, the real attractions are below, by the harbor. I recommend that you skip the Marine Tower until you are ready to go back to Tokyo in the evening, when the lights of the city come alive, assuming you are taking the JR train from Ishikawa-cho station. Also recommend that you walk along the shore using the elevated Kaiko Promenade which will take you to the Hikawa Maru, a cargo and passenger ship, and to Yamashita Park, where the Water Goddess fountain is located. And remember to be back in Tokyo by midnight, when the Metro closes, or you will have to take an expensive taxi back to your abode.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

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