Kyoto Shopping

  • Fans this inexpensive are likely to be from China
    Fans this inexpensive are likely to be...
    by shrimp56
  • Handkerchiefs and wash clothes are fun souvenirs
    Handkerchiefs and wash clothes are fun...
    by shrimp56
  • My soba noodle lunch
    My soba noodle lunch
    by shrimp56

Best Rated Shopping in Kyoto

  • vic&michael's Profile Photo

    At Kitano Tenmangu-ji (Shrine): Tenjin-San Markets

    by vic&michael Updated Mar 29, 2006

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    Looking at Japanese nick-nacks
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    Tenjin-san Markets is held at Kitano Tenmangu-shrine on the 25th of Every Month. So, if you're in Kyoto over the 25th of any month, you should come to the markets and check out all the cool things to buy!
    I just love Market Athmosphere. There are so many people, so many stalls with interesting foods and nick-nacks!
    Michael and I especially enjoy trying out strange food-on-a-stick at the markets. Here, Michael tried bbq Octopus on a stick, and mochi (pounded rice) on a stick, and I tried frozen banana dipped in chocolate on a stick! It was so yummy. There were so many other types of food to try too.

    What to buy: Second-Hand Kimonos and Obis. Some are in good condition, you will have to dig through the piles of 2nd hand kimonos to find them.
    Antiques- old Japanese money, war memorabilia, furniture, wood-block printings.
    Pottery-antique and new pottery is sold here.

    What to pay: You could spend nothing, and just have a day of walking around and absorbing in all the new sights. Or, you could spend heaps of money on buying antiques. I usually just spend about $5-10 on trying out lots of new foods!

    Related to:
    • Study Abroad
    • Family Travel

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    Shichimiya: Spices heaven

    by xaver Written Oct 11, 2009

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    spice shop

    This is a shop very close to Kiyomizu temple.
    It simply has the wide variety of spices and, also many combinations of spices.
    While going around the shop you can smell spices and also taste some of them.

    What to buy: Their specisality is definitly the seven spices Tang Dinasty.

    What to pay: One small bag is about 250 yen.

    Related to:
    • Food and Dining

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  • pammo's Profile Photo

    Isetan: Shopping Near JR Kyoto Station

    by pammo Updated Apr 14, 2004

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    Spring 2004 Fashions (ugh)

    The store itself is unremarkable in terms of shopping, but the tiered escalators are definitely worth checking out. If you go out to the courtyard outside the 11th floor, you can get a good view of the city.

    There is a grocery store in the basement that cuts the prices of many fresh food items about an hour or so before closing so you can get some excellent deals. It also has a good place to pick up a bento box or other food on the run fixings.

    What to pay: 50yen and up depending on what you are buying.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Trains

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  • ChuckG's Profile Photo

    Takashimaya, Hankyu, Fujii, Daimaru: Shijo Dori

    by ChuckG Written Jul 14, 2003

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    All these department stores are very big and offer everything you could think of. If after a day of walking through the old town and temples, you want to relax a bit by shopping around, it's a good alternative...

    What to buy: Clothes, souvenirs, cosmetics

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  • ChuckG's Profile Photo

    Souvenir stores: Souvenirs on Kiyomizuzaka

    by ChuckG Written Jul 17, 2003

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    Kiyomizuzaka

    These street is bordered with tons of little stores offering various type of goods. You will find specialized stored selling only local crafts and paintings as well as the usual souvenir shop selling everything written "Kyoto" on it.

    What to buy: I found a vast variety of silk paintings and traditional drawings insome stores very worth buying. The price are decent.

    What to pay: Less than in department stores

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  • Restless-in-kl's Profile Photo

    Nishiri Market: What to get at Nishiri Market

    by Restless-in-kl Written Jan 10, 2006

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    Nishiri market

    Nishiri Market is like a bazaar that sells mainly clothing items. Set in a covered pedestrian mall, Nishiri Market clothing is young and trendy.

    It's also a good place to eat as there are many cafes and restaurants here.

    What to buy: Clothes

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

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  • Ines28's Profile Photo

    Kyoto Handicraft Center: Any souvenir at any price

    by Ines28 Written Jul 30, 2005

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    The Kyoto Handicraft Center is a five or six storey souvenir shop selling anything you can imagine. Here you probably have all possible smaller souvenir shops combined in a huge one!

    What to buy: From calligraphies and paintings to wood carvings, plates, dolls, kimonos, Samurai swords and books - you name it, they have it!

    What to pay: That's the problem about it - it's expensive! If you got loads of money to spend, then you'll find your perfect souvenir, expect to pay something between € 100 and € 500!
    A small painting without frame costs around € 15, that was the cheapest but still beautiful item we could find here.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

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  • VolsUT's Profile Photo

    Shijo Shopping area: Longest shopping street in Japan.

    by VolsUT Written Mar 8, 2007

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    The Shijo shopping area is home to the longest pedestrain mall in Japan. The shopping goes on forever and the street houses shops that cater to everyone from expencive galleries to cheap tshirt shops.

    What to buy: Whatever you want

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  • vic&michael's Profile Photo

    To-ji Temple: Second-hand Kimonos and Yukatas

    by vic&michael Updated May 21, 2005

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    Silks and Yukatas

    What to buy: In Japan, second-hand clothes shopping is still looked down on by many people, so you can buy many second-hand kimonos or yukatas (light summertime kimono) for cheaper here!

    What to pay: You can spend a lot of money on Kimonos! But you can find a good bargain in To-ji for about ¥2000.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

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  • DirtyRudy's Profile Photo

    Ikuokaya: Kyoto Souvenirs

    by DirtyRudy Written Jul 9, 2003

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    Ikuokaya

    You can get a lot of nice souvenirs from Kyoto from this shop. They sell a lot of purses and hair pins for girls. Actually, come to think of it, most of the merchandise was for girls! I bought a cute purse for my niece there.

    What to pay: A little less expensive than the other stores.

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  • husain's Profile Photo

    the hundred yen shops: shopping for less!

    by husain Updated Nov 15, 2002

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    a hyakunen shop

    Until recently, the brand-conscious Japanese were willing to pay two or three times more for brand names, however, the slowdown in the Japanese economy has forced people to consider otherwise...
    100 yen shops, where you can get interesting goods- from fashlights to CD holders, and some typical `Japanese' souviners... (even if they are made in China!)
    Its a welcome break from the over-priced shops all around. A must visit for all bargain hunters!

    What to buy: Check out the ones on Terramacchi street. Theres a new one that had come up not much before i visited, and it was quite classy actually- not the usual plastic stuff... we were left wondering if it was the wrong shop judging by the displays and goods available!
    Its good value for money even if much of the stuff there has a little `made in China' label!

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  • heywinks's Profile Photo

    HORAIDO: BEAUTIFUL TEA CANISTERS & IMPLEMENTS

    by heywinks Written Oct 14, 2002

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    Horaido Tea Shop

    This shop is filled with tea cups, bamboo tea spoons and implements, tea canisters, tea, etc. Everything needed to have a tea party!!

    What to buy: Buy the tea canisters! They are the cheapest I have seen in Japan. They start at 350 yen. Buy the ones covered with Japanese paper or tatami. The largest ones of these two kinds are only 500 yen! What a deal!
    Be careful not the wet the outside of the ones covered w/ Japanese paper. Once you wet it, the paper gets a bit sticky and it`s not as beautiful anymore.

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  • heywinks's Profile Photo

    YELLOW CAMERA: WHERE TO DEVELOP YOUR FILM

    by heywinks Written Oct 14, 2002

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    This film developing shop is conveniently located on Kawaramachi Street. It`s a yellow colored store (hence the name!) & easy to spot next to the Lipton Tea Room.
    Developing film is expensive in Japan. You pay a developing fee PLUS a fee per photo developed.
    At Yellow Camera, the developing fee is 598 yen. I usually get 4X6 inch photos developed and the fee per photo here is 12 yen (compared to 35-40 yen at other shops). If you can wait a day and pick it up the next day, you can get a discount and pay only 9 yen per photo. An index print is 130 yen.
    The quality is good & I`ve had no problems at this shop.

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  • tompt's Profile Photo

    don´t know :(: Buy a warmed toiletseat

    by tompt Updated Aug 7, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    warmed toiletseats....

    What to buy: If you are a person who get cold easily consider buying a warmed toiletseat.
    It feels like someone has been there before you and sat on it for quit a while ;)
    but in Japan they are very populair. (At least in public places like restaurants)
    Make sure it will work at home, check voltage and plug. Japan has 110 volt and a two rectangular-pole plug.

    What to pay: Prices are high! It will cost you 500-900 Euro or Dollar.

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  • Pixiekatten's Profile Photo

    Shinpuhkan: "The New Style Hall"

    by Pixiekatten Written Nov 22, 2006

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    Shinpuhkan I
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    Located at the corner of Sanjo and Karasuma Streets, Shinpuhkan was built in 1926 (Taisho 15). Shinpuhkan was designed by the Ministry of Posts and Communications architect Yoshida Tetsuro (1894-1956) to be used as the Central Telephone Company Building.

    The tile on the building's exterior are arranged in a subtly irregular design that is one of the building's distinguishing features. The bricks are laid in an unusual pattern, which might be considered an influence of North German Expressionist Movement.

    It was re-opened in 2001 as the Shinpuhkan shopping center. The three-storied building features clothing stores, restaurants, cafes etc., and the inner courtyard is used to hold events, as well as housing business facilities.

    Related to:
    • Women's Travel
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Business Travel

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Kyoto Shopping

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