Fushimi Inari Shrine, Kyoto

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  • Path of a thousand Torii
    Path of a thousand Torii
    by Jim_Eliason
  • Fushimi Inari taisha
    Fushimi Inari taisha
    by Jim_Eliason
  • Fushimi Inari taisha
    Fushimi Inari taisha
    by Jim_Eliason
  • nexusangel's Profile Photo

    Gorgeous Toriis and for Free!

    by nexusangel Written Jun 30, 2013

    This is actually the main Inari shrine in Japan (which is a shrine dedicated to the fox spirit).
    Seemingly endless rows of red torii line the pathway up along the hilly trail of Mount Inari (stands about 233m).

    The toriis are mainly donated by individuals or companies to the shrine for blessings or thanksgiving.

    The entire gentle hike is really long and can take about 3hrs, although i personally don't think you need to trek all the way up to enjoy this place. In fact the number of toriis reduces at the top.

    Map of the shrine area (in japanese) http://inari.jp/trip/map01/

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  • aukahkay's Profile Photo

    Fushimi Inari Shrine

    by aukahkay Written Aug 4, 2010

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    Fushimi Inari Shrine is the most famous of several thousands of shrines dedicated to Inari across Japan. Inari is the Shinto god of rice, and foxes are thought to be his messengers. Therefore, many fox statues can be found at Inari shrines.

    Fushimi Inari Shrine is also famous for the countless torii gates, offerings by worshippers, that cover the hiking trails of Inarisan, the wooded mountain behind the shrine's main buildings. It takes about two hours to walk along the whole trail.

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  • Rabbityama's Profile Photo

    Fushimi Inari Shrine

    by Rabbityama Written Jul 25, 2010

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    Fushimi Inari is the head of all Inari shrines, which is the god of rice and commerce, both of which are very important in Japan. The famous torii gates lined up all over the mountainside were donated by various companies in Japan and they are written on the outside of the gates.

    You'll often find fox statues at inari shrines throughout the nation. In Shintoism, foxes are believed to be messengers, particularly for Inari, although foxes have importance in Japanese culture outside of Shintoism, as well. During the Heian Period, Fushimi Inari Shrine was considered to be one of the top shrines in Japan and the Imperial Court made offerings here.

    The Fushimi area is famous for Inari-zushi. If you want to try it, be aware that there is a small restaurant halfway up the mountainside that offers authentic Inari-zushi much cheaper than the shops at the bottom, and it also offers a great view of the torii gates!

    Entrance is free.

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  • muratkorman's Profile Photo

    A beautiful shrine not to be missed

    by muratkorman Written Sep 28, 2009

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    This shrine is dedicated to Inari, the Shinto god of rice. Across Japan, you can find several thousands of shrines for Inari, but Fushimi Inari Shrine is the most famous of all due to its amazing orange torii gates. It takes about 2 hours to walk along the whole trail marked by hundreds of these which are offerings by the worshippers. Foxes are the messengers of Inari and you can find many fox statues in Inari shrines. To our surprise we came across many cats in this beautiful shrine. The shrine is always open and the admission is free. To reach Inari, just take JR Nara Train from Kyoto and get off at second stop. In 10 minutes you will find yourself walking through the orange torii gates.

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  • bladedragon's Profile Photo

    Fushimi Inari Taisha

    by bladedragon Updated Jun 26, 2009

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    Thousands of Torii in Fushimi-Inari
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    This Shrine is a head Shrine of Inari (Inari is the God of business).
    It has thousands of Torii lining up from the base up to some of the smaller Shrines on Inari mountain.
    There are also statues of Kitsune (Fox) which is regarded as God's messenger everywhere in the Shrine.
    It is said that the two-storey entry gate was built by Toyotomi Hideyoshi.

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  • RACCOON1's Profile Photo

    Mt. FUSHIMI INARI TAISHA SHRINE

    by RACCOON1 Updated Oct 11, 2007

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    The Fushima Inari Shrine was founded in the 8th Century and is the head shrne of some 30,000 Inari Shrines in Japan.

    Easy to get to from Kyoto Station ( see below) .

    The shrne is composed of a nunber of builidng at the base folllowed by a 4 km tunnel/trail up the mountain side

    A walk through the red tori gates is quite unique. The gates have been donated by companies, local governments ,etc.

    Budget 2 hours for a slow walk through the whole compllex. Although Japan can get hot in August the mountain trees provide shade and this is a good place to cool off.

    Open 24 hours a day, free and not crowded.

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  • sandrafiza's Profile Photo

    Fushimi Inari-taisha Shrine

    by sandrafiza Updated Sep 17, 2007

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    I think everybody who go to Kyoto should visit this place.

    The Fushimi Inari-taisha shrine is dedicated to the God of rice and sake in the 8th century, behind the shrine you will see unending path of over 5000 vibrant orange torii gates and dozens of statues of foxes. The fox is considered the messenger of Inari, the god of grain foods and the stone foxes are often referred to as Inari. The key often seen in the fox's mouth is for the rice granary. On an incidental note, the Japanese traditionally see the fox as a sacred, somewhat mysterious figure capable of "possessing" humans the favored point of entry is under the fingernails.

    A walk around the upper precincts is a pleasant day hike. It also makes for a delightfully eerie stroll in the late afternoon and early evening, when the various graveyards and miniature shrines along the path take on a mysterious air.

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  • alluringworld's Profile Photo

    The mother of Inari shrines-Fushimi Inari Taisha

    by alluringworld Written May 3, 2007

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    I personally like this Shrine. Built in 711 to enshrine the God of grains, the entire path is about 4 km long and it is lined with Torii gates. To complete the entire path, it'll take about 2 hours.

    Make sure you have brought enough water and have gone to washroom before embarking it... :)

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  • UKDaisy's Profile Photo

    Fushimi Inari Shrine

    by UKDaisy Updated Mar 5, 2007

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    One of my favourite and most unique places in Japan.
    Can you imagine a "tunnel" created by lining up one torii gate after another? Well, this is where you can see it for yourself! All brightly coloured orange, and with different "tunnels" to choose to enter, it's like going through a maze. This was featured in the movie "Memoirs of a geisha".
    This is one of the most unique experiences in Japan. You have to walk through/under gate after gate (each one between a few inches to metres apart... the bigger they are the further apart) from the bottom of a hill to the top.

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  • yukisanto's Profile Photo

    Fushimi Inari shrine

    by yukisanto Updated Feb 1, 2007
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    This is THE ONE shrine that you just have to visit if you're in kyoto. Why? Coz it's not yet another shrine. What's unique about this place is the thousand tori gates that lined the hill. We walked for like 1.5hrs to the lookout point and it was only one third of the walk. You're just walking through underneath all those red gates in the forest on and on forever. It's a calming and peaceful activity to do. When I was there, I saw lot more Japanese than tourists coming here, although I dunno why.

    The fox is the guardian of this shrine. Apparently, the tori gates are given by businessmen who prayed at this shrine and were later on successful, so this is their way of offerings.

    There is a tree along the way with a small altar in the forest - supposedly you walk one round around the tree and passing under its raised root and you'll be blessed with happiness.

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  • crewrower's Profile Photo

    Fushimi Inri Temple

    by crewrower Written Jul 9, 2006

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    Located outside of Kyoto but accessible by public bus, the Fushimi Inri Temple is a great Buddhist temple to visit, especially in the Summer. The temple has lots of red torii gates and statutes all around.

    My favorite part of this temple is that the corridors and rooms are very very cool inside. Even in the height of Summer these rooms are cool, almost like they are air-conditioned. The engineering design is just genius. You will be impressed.

    You need about 90 minutes here.

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  • cheesecake17's Profile Photo

    The orange Torii

    by cheesecake17 Updated Mar 25, 2006

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    What makes FUSHIMI INARI special is the beautiful walking course up the mountain. The path is lined with thousands of orange Torii (gates) and has several quaint, smaller shrines on the way.

    The hike is 4km long and takes about 2-3 hours..
    Inari is the Shinto god of rice and sake, two essential commodities both in the culture and history of trade and life in Japan. With the rise of industry and the diminishing importance of agriculture, the role of Inari shrines has grown to represent success and prosperity in business.

    Traditionally, prayers were made at Inari shrines for a good harvest, nowadays, Fushimi Inari Shrine draws thousands of business and tradespeople seeking blessings for their enterprises..

    Each of the 10,000 tori gate are donated by worshippers or companies whose name and addresses are written on the back. Considering the profile of the shrine, it is not surprising to find that almost every well-known Japanese company has sponsored a Tori gate here.

    Prices vary with size, ranging from the small 30cm high torii to the 3m tall ones..

    Visite the shrine in the late afternoon as the sun slowly sets can be a thrilling experience and scary too..:)..

    The 4km walk through the torii tunnel to the top of the Inari-san hill can be a strenuous one, especially in the heat of summer. Two large ponds and several small waterfalls can be found in the maze of torii, depending on which path you decide to follow..
    When you reach to the top of the mountain side a good view of Kyoto can be appreciated

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  • cheesecake17's Profile Photo

    The fox...

    by cheesecake17 Written Mar 3, 2006

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    The entrance gates to temples and shrines are most often guarded by a pair of protector deities
    At Oinari Shrines, the gates are guarded by a pair of foxes. In many cases, these gate protectors are garbed in red or painted red, for their job is to block the path to evil.
    A pair of stone fox statues stand on guard at the entry to each of the site's shrines and sub-shrines.

    By the 11th century, Inari becomes intricately associated with the fox. In Japan, the fox is a legendary creature with supernatural powers for doing both good and evil. Able to transform into human shape (typically that of a bewitching woman), and to hear and see all secrets of humankind..A key often seen in the mouth of a fox statue is for the rice granary.

    According to Kasama Inari Shrine
    In ancient Shinto, the "mountain kami" was believed to descend from its winter residence in the mountain to become the "paddy field kami" in the spring, residing there during the subsequent agricultural season. Following the fall harvest, the deity would return once again to its winter home in the mountains in its role as the "mountain kami."

    All this probably took place at the same time that foxes appeared each season. As such, the fox naturally became known as the messenger of Inari

    Japanese folktale...says...A black fox is good luck, a white fox calamity; three foxes together portend disaster.

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  • cheesecake17's Profile Photo

    FUSHIMI INARI SHRINE

    by cheesecake17 Updated Mar 3, 2006

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    IMPORTANT CULTURAL PROPERTY
    Located about 2km southeast of Kyoto station on the outskirts of the sake-making district of Fushimi, FUSHIMI INARI TAISHA is without doubt the largest , oldest and most impressive Inari shrine in Japan dedicated to the the GOD OF RICE AND SAKE

    It was established in the 8th century by the Hata family and is the head shrine of no less than 30,000 Inari Shrines nationwide.

    The Shrine actually has 5 shrines spread across the ground.. First you will see the Sakura-mon Gate and Go-Honden Shrine then followed by a 4km tunnel made of thousands of orange torii gates making their way through the woods.

    The shrine displays more lanterns than any Japanese temple or shrine I have ever seen.
    Thousands of them can be seen near the gate alone.

    Also you will see the EMA or wishing plaques, in the shape of a fox's head...purchase one of them and write your wishes on it..and hang with all the others.....you wish will come thru...

    Like most Shinto shrines, Fushimi Inari Taisha is open 24h a day all year-round and admission is free.

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  • traveldream's Profile Photo

    Fushimi Inari Taisha

    by traveldream Written Dec 29, 2005
    Fushimi Inari Taisha

    This shrine is dedicated to the god of harvest, represented by a fox image. Long ago it was farmers who came here and pray for a good harvest, but nowadays businessmen come here as well. This shrine is interesting for its line of torii (gates) that leads to way to the mountain. Each businessman give a torii to the shrine so there are more and more new torii.

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