Fujieda Local Customs

  • Throwing Beans from the Stage
    Throwing Beans from the Stage
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  • Local Customs
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  • The Villa of Tanaka Castle
    The Villa of Tanaka Castle
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Most Recent Local Customs in Fujieda

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    Aburana( Brassica rapa or Brassica nupus)

    by taigaa001 Updated Feb 6, 2014

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    They are often roadside plants

    Turnip rapes are generally recognized as the early spring flowers in Japan. These plants are often grown to take rapseed oil. In southern pacific coast areas turnip rapes usually bloom as early as February to March. They are also grown for green vegetables. As per the definition, what Japanese call Aburana or Nanohana encompass both Brassica rapa and Brassica nupus and both look very similar in appearance. For rapeseed use, Brassica nupus is prefered while for green vegetable Brassica rapa. But both families are planted just for ornamental plants to lure tourists.

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    Plum Viewing at Villa of Tanaka Castle

    by taigaa001 Written Feb 5, 2014

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    Villa of Tanaka Caslte is the garden with old buildings related to Tanaka Castle. From February through March the area becomes a nice place to view Ume(plum) blossoms. I went there on the next day of the first day of Spring and some of the plum trees began to bloom.

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    Bean Throwing (Setsubun) Festival at Narita-san

    by taigaa001 Updated Feb 3, 2014

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    Throwing Beans from the Stage

    Setsubun is the day before the first day of spring which usually falls on February the third. On that day, bean throwing by saying "Oni-wa Soto", "Fuku-wa-uchi," meaning "bad luck out, good luck in" is carried out at home. On that day some of the Buddhist temples and Shinto shrines also hold a festival called SETSUBUN-E or SETSUBUNSAI. The most notable of which is that of Naritasan Shinshoji temple in Narita, Chiba. In Fujieda bean-throwing festival is held at Fujieda Narita-san temple at the east edge of former Fujieda-shuku of Old Tokaido Road. At that festival, men and women who are born in the year of particular Chinese Zodiac sign(Toshiotoko, Toshionna) throw bean-packed sacs to the waiting crowd from the stage. This year bean throwers are those who are born in the year of the Horse, or who are either 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72, or 90 years old by the end of the calendar year. Some of the bean-sac have lotteries inside and the first prize this year is an electric-motor bicycle. Most of the Buddhist temples do not chant "Oniwa Soto" phrase when throwing beans because in Buddhism demons bringing bad luck can also be converted to the true faith.

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    (O)Hayashi

    by taigaa001 Written Oct 6, 2013

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    A Woman Playing a Traverse Flute
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    (O)-Hayashi is an ensemble made up of players of traditional Japanese musical instruments. Typical make-up of O-hayashi for Fujieda Taisai festival is:

    SHAMISEN: Three-stringed banjo-like instrument often used for Nagauta music and background music for Kabuki or Noh performance.
    WADAIKO: Wadaiko are the traditional styled prucussion instruments originally used for the religious ceremonies or for the wars. Nagado-daiko or Large Japanese drums are often used in Japan. Large drum has the low-toned large echoing sounds while smaller shime-taiko is often used for nagauta music.
    YOKOBUE: Yokobue (yokofue) is a Japanese traverse flute often made up of bamboo. During festival traverse flutes called Shinofue rather than Shakuhachi are used to make high-piched sound.

    Vocal for the ohayashi is often done by Shamisen players.

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    Yatai (Float) for the festival

    by taigaa001 Updated Oct 6, 2013

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    Fujieda Taisai festival float has a karahafu gable
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    Yatai is an ornate float used either for portable retailer or for the festival. They are either two-wheeled or four-wheeled depending on the size of the float. In Shizuoka, ornate floats with karahafu -style gable are popular particularly for the festivals in middle to western part of Shizuoka prefecture. Most of the floats for Fujieda Taisai festival are close in style for what are used in Hamamatsu, or Fukuroi which has a lot of excellent float makers. During the festival men on the roof of the float instruct bearers where the float should be directed. The float has a space for hayashi emsemble made up of players of traditional Japanese musical instruments..Some floats have a space for little girls for dance performance on a float. And the biggest highlight of the festival is turning of the float to showcase the technique of managing the wheels.

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    Hono-no-Mai Dance

    by taigaa001 Updated Oct 4, 2013

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    Dance accompanied by Shamisen music.
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    Hono-no-mai is a dance performance dedicated to the kami in Shinto Shrines or buddha or bodhisattva or acala in Buddhist temples. During Fujieda Taisai or Great Fujieda Festival the large-scale festival held once in every three years, residents of each district pay a visit to Akunami Shrine, 1700-year-old shrine accompanying with float for the festival. Residents of Okadeyama District for instance performed children dance based upon one of the Nagauta(long epic song with shamisen accompaniment) song GORO TOKIMUNE (nagauta based on revenge story of Soga Brothers during late 12th century) and adult dance based upon nagauta song of HINAZURU SANBASOU, (one of the classic nagauta songs used for celebration of auspicious event).

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    Christmas Cake

    by taigaa001 Updated Nov 25, 2011

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    Christmas Cake, a must-item in Japanese Christmas

    How do Japanese celebrate Christmas? Although more than 90 percent of Japanese are non-Christian, they celebrate Christmas in various manners. Some young couples spend a night with dinner during Christmas. Many Japanese buy a christmas tree and give presents just like U.S. and European countries, but almost all Japanese buy Christmas Cake decorated with red strawberries and white creams. Sweet shops like 31 Ice Cream(BR chain in Japan) take pre-orders for Christmas Cake(BR version should be called Christmas Ice Cake) about one month before Christmas. For people outside Japan, eating Christmas Cake in Christmas is thought to be peculiar and Christmas cake issue is one of the most popular questions non-Japanese ask about Japan. Like Valentine chocolate during mid February, it started by a confectionary maker. Fujiya is the first Japanese confectionary maker which sold the Christmas Cake in Japan in 1910. Eating Christmas cake have been prevalent like today since mid 1970s which coincided with the era Japan experienced high GNP growth.

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Fujieda Local Customs

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