Sports Events in Japan

  • You will see the entrance of the trail
    You will see the entrance of the trail
    by taigaa001
  • Sports & Outdoors
    by taigaa001
  • Sports & Outdoors
    by taigaa001

Most Viewed Sports & Outdoors in Japan

  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    Kyudo - Japanese Archery

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Jan 18, 2015

    Kyudo is a traditional Japanese art that is practiced with a very long, 2-meter bamboo bow called a yumi. Because of the length of the bow, the archer holds the arrow about 1/3 the distance from the bottom of the bow, hence the name asymmetrical bows. The earliest documented history of Japanese archery are images from around 500 BC, and it was the primary weapon of battle until the arrival of westerners in Japan in the 1500s, with their modern firearms. While the bow was no longer used in battle, the archery gained prominence as a ceremonial practice and a competitive sport.

    Today kyudo is a very popular in Japan, and it has gained followers around the world. It is not uncommon to ride the train in Tokyo and see a group of archers with their bows and quivers of arrows on the trains and subways.

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  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    Hiking Mount Fuji

    by Ewingjr98 Written Sep 5, 2014

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    The most famous thing to do in the Fuji-Hakone-Izu area is climbing Mount Fuji. There are four trails that are open on the mountain only from July to early September. The trails are well marked by colored signs: the Yoshida Trail is yellow; the Subashiri Trail is red; the Gotemba Trail is green; and the Fujinomiya Trail is blue. The Yoshida trail is the most popular route to the top of the mountain, because it is most easily accessed from Tokyo.

    If you decide to hike this mountain, plan ahead. Get in shape, and practice with a few smaller hikes (perhaps Mitake and Takao would be good, local, and scenic options!). Bring the right gear (lights, rain clothes, warm clothes, sturdy hiking boots) and basic foods (lots of water, and energy foods like granola bars and chocolate). Plan for a long day... most hikers need to rest frequently to adjust to the altitude on the way up the mountain.

    See my Fuji-Hakone-Izu-kokuritsu-koen page for a detailed description of the Yoshida Trail: http://members.virtualtourist.com/m/15861/eea63/4/

    Here is a video I took on Mount Fuji before my camera got wet and the lens fogged! http://members.virtualtourist.com/m/vv/8540/

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  • taigaa001's Profile Photo

    Where to watch Homare Sawa In Japan?

    by taigaa001 Updated Aug 3, 2011

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    L.League soccer club INAC Kobe has seven of Japanese national team members including Homare Sawa the Most Valuable Player of FIFA Women's World Cup 2011.

    Next INAC Kobe Leonessa game takes place in Niigata on August 6.

    Kobe INAC Leonessa vs Niigata Albirex Ladies(Kamino'Obe, Sakaguchi)
    August 6 Tohoku Denryoku Big Swan Stadium. 3:30 p.m. (Ticket price advanced 2,000-4000 yen ticket at the door 2,500-4,500 yen for adults)
    Also run is the J1 league game: Shimizu S-pulse vs Niigata Albirex 7:00 p.m. You can watch both games with the same ticket.
    You can get ticket by using the ticket reservation machine in Lawson(convenience store). With the L-code #30350. You can use the special bus service for the stadium from Niigata station.

    Related to:
    • Women's Travel

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    Baseball in Japan

    by Paul2001 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Baseball in a very popular sport in Japan. The Japanese probably rank amongst the Americans and the Cubans as the best baseball players in the world. In fact a touring baseball team of high school players recently played a game against my high school here in Toronto and cleaned their clock. They won 10 to 0 and my old high school is highly regarded for the quality of its baseball team.
    There are two professional leagues in Japan, the Central and Pacific, both being made up of six teams. To watch a game, you can buy tickets at the ballpark starting about 1000 yen. Though baseball is popular, the games are rarely sold out and you should be able to purchase tickets with a problem.
    Baseball in Japan has some minor differences from the game as it is played in the Americas. The whole infield is dirt covered unlike the American infields. Also the outfield fences are not so far out. They are shorter by about 3m. The pitchers tend to be more finesse throwers as opposed to the overpowering style of American pitchers. The website posted below will give you more information about baseball in Japan.
    This picture was taken by me at a high school baseball game I was at on Hokkaido.

    Baseball in Japan
    Related to:
    • Family Travel

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  • gogonicetrip's Profile Photo

    Martial art, Karate

    by gogonicetrip Written Jun 12, 2010

    Karate is a martial art developed in the Okinawa, Kyushu, and is art of self-defense that use no weapons and relies instead on three main techniques; arm strike, thrusts and kicks.

    A distinction is made between offensive and defensive tourniquets, which are modified according to the position of onefs opponent.

    Today karate becomes popularity for self-perfection, for cultural reasons, for self-defense and as a sport.

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  • boltonian's Profile Photo

    Baseball

    by boltonian Written Apr 14, 2009

    The biggest passion in Japanese sport is baseball.

    Most cities have a team and games are played from April to September.

    I was told that games often sell out, but we were easily able to buy them on the day. Prices range from 1800 YEN to 5000 YEN.

    Check out the schedule and roll up for a great day/night out. The game I saw was of a good standard. Beer inside is delivered by girls with backpacks to your seat priced 800 YEN

    Tokyo Dome

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    J-League

    by boltonian Written Apr 14, 2009

    You can watch J-League in most cities from March to December.

    The teams may have more than 1 stadium in the city so you must check which the game is being played at.

    Tickets tend to start at 1500 YEN up to 5000 YEN.

    Nissan Stadium Yokomama

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  • Pixiekatten's Profile Photo

    Hanshin Tigers - Baseball

    by Pixiekatten Updated Apr 2, 2008

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    History of the Tigers
    The Hanshin Tigers baseball club is the second oldest pro baseball franchise in Japan, founded on December 10, 1935. The Tigers took part in the first professional baseball "season" in Japan the following year.
    From 1936 to 1938, the Tigers were arguably the best team in Japanese pro baseball. However, from 1939 the Tokyo-based Yomiuri Giants began to dominate, beginning the bitter rivalry between the two teams which continues today.

    The Tigers were extremely successful in the early years, winning championships in 1936-38, 1944 and 1947. The year 1985 is still fondly remembered by all Hanshin fans. Not only did the club win the Japan Series for the first (and so far only) time, but their first baseman Randy Bass won the Triple Crown award AND the Japan Series MVP award as well - in the process elevating himself to God-like status in the Kansai region. When the Hanshin Tigers won the Japan Series in 1985, the fans went delirious. Among other things, they hijacked a train in Tokyo, and at Dotonbori, one of the entertainment districts in Osaka, people were jumping into the polluted river.

    Historic Koshien Stadium in Nishinomiya is the oldest and most famous ballpark in Japan and the home of the Hanshin Tigers. It was built in 1924 and has been the scene of many great baseball feats over the years.

    Tickets!
    Ticket prices range from 1400 to 3500 yen (a little more when the Giants are in town), with kids' tickets starting from 500 yen. You can buy tickets at the ground or at one of the many general ticket outlets in Kansai. But if the Tigers are playing well, you'll have to book well ahead!

    Equipment: The Hanshin Tigers Fight Song

    The Wind of Mount Rokko
    (The official English version, but not a direct translation.)

    Dashing swiftly through the wind blowin' from Rokko
    Like the big sun soaring in the clear blue sky
    Mighty spirit of the youth shows the victor's grace
    The name that shines in glory "Hanshin Tigers"
    Oh! Oh! Oh! Oh! Hanshin Tigers
    Hooray, Hooray, Hooray, Hooray!

    Powerful hits and skillful pitch achieved a thousand times
    Trained with every discipline here at Koshien
    Crowned with constant victory glorious, matchless feat
    Always proud, invincible "Hanshin Tigers"
    Oh! Oh! Oh! Oh! Hanshin Tigers
    Hooray, Hooray, Hooray, Hooray!

    (Pic Source: http://www.japantimes.co.jp/images/photos2007/sb20070912j1a.jpg)

    Hanshin Tigers
    Related to:
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  • gogonicetrip's Profile Photo

    Kyudo, is the Japanese art of achery

    by gogonicetrip Updated Jun 1, 2007

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    Kyudo, literally meaning "way of the bow", is the Japanese art of archery that is a modern Japanese martial art.

    Kyudo is practiced as an art and as a means of moral and spiritual development. Many archers practice kyudo as a sport, with marksmanship being paramount.
    However, the goal most devotees of kyudo seek is seisha seichu, "correct shooting is correct hitting".
    In kyudo the unique action of expansion that results in a natural release, is strived for. When the spirit and balance of the shooting is correct the result will be for the arrow to arrive in the target.
    To give oneself completely to the shooting is the spiritual goal. In this respect, many kyudo practitioners believe that competition, examination, and any opportunity that places the archer in this uncompromising situation is important, while other practitioners will avoid competitions or examinations of any kind.

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    Motorboat racing

    by gogonicetrip Updated Nov 2, 2006

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    Motorboat racing, called Kyotei in Japanese is one of Japanese gambling.

    Kyotei is a race of six boats competing to win.
    The racer’s uniform color and boat flag color are specified; Boat No.1 white, Boat No.2 black, Boat No.3 red, Boat No.4 blue, Boat No.5 yellow, Boat No.6 green.
    Race proceeds from the start line, turning past the 1st and 2nd turn markers, and then determining the finish places after three laps.

    Don't you try to win?

    [Back to Japan]

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  • gogonicetrip's Profile Photo

    Keirin

    by gogonicetrip Updated Nov 2, 2006

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    Keirin, a track cycling event in which professional racing cyclists sprint for victory, is one of the legalized gambling in Japan.

    Keirin began in 1948 in Kokura, Kitakyusyu Japan, and has become very popular there professional sport upon which the Japanese can be bet on the outcome of the race.

    You can make money to buy betting ticket at the Keirin stadium.

    [Back to Japan]

    Related to:
    • Casino and Gambling

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  • gogonicetrip's Profile Photo

    Sumo, is a Japan's National Sport

    by gogonicetrip Updated Nov 2, 2006

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    Sumo, Japan’s National Sport, not only Japanese but an increasing number of non-Japanese among its funs.

    In Sumo, two wrestlers face off in the middle of the Dohyo (ringed platform) measuring 4.55 meters in diameter. Clad only in Mawashi, they first engage in pre-bout ritual such as striking fearsome poses and scattering purifying salt on the ring, all of which actions are part of Sumo’s ancient tradition.
    This ritual is one of the aspects that particularly appeals to foreign fans.
    Although there are 70 different ways to win a bout.

    Wrestlers are ranked after each tournament on the basis of their won/lost record.
    The top rank of Yokozuna has been conferred upon over 60 men.

    [Back to Japan]

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  • SLLiew's Profile Photo

    Skiing in Japan

    by SLLiew Written Oct 8, 2006

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    Was surprised that young Japanese enjoyed skiing. From 1-2 hours drive from Tokyo, you can reach a ski slope. So skiing is a viable weekend sports even if you are willing to pay and wait.

    Ski gear, ski glasses and ski equipment seems to be important to be seen. Part of the good life.

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    JINRIKISHA

    by manuelEB Written Sep 25, 2006

    In old days -not so old considering the thousands years of Japanese History- they would pull the car long distances to take you to inverosimile destinations. It was the begining of the Meiji Era -middle XIX century- and this "taxi" system was used for foreigners coming to Japan to show how a great society can become puritan (no more mixed public baths!!!) or how to deal with internal problems invading and making war to neighboor countries... The name of the vehicle passed to West. Later on karate, geisha, harakiri and fujiyama would follow....

    Why do I add it as a sport activity? Well you gotta see the young men and women doing this work and tell me about paying to a gym to get "fit".

    You can have a flavor of JINRIKISHA in major touristic spots... The one pictured here was taken in Kyoto´s Arashiyama.

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    Jogging outside Imperial Palace

    by SLLiew Written Aug 23, 2006

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    Many Japanese are exercising, walking or jogging outside the large spaces around the Imperial Palace early in the morning before work.

    A good place to see the locals playing hard before working hard.

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