Tokushima Things to Do

  • tebajima island whale scape(photo's photo)
    tebajima island whale scape(photo's...
    by hassy
  • crossing to tebajima island
    crossing to tebajima island
    by hassy
  • village mail street
    village mail street
    by hassy

Most Recent Things to Do in Tokushima

  • Tatsue-ji temple(the 19th of shikoku pilgrimage)

    by hassy Written Oct 25, 2013
    main hall ceiling outside
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    I had a chance to see pictures on the ceiling.
    Notification say no fotos,but I noticed after take photos.
    Motif of the painting is not like a typical temple.
    They are painted by students of art school about 30 years ago.

    I also went " oku no in"( what should I say in english? It looks like inner sanctuary,isnt it?)
    There are 88 small budda statues around path,collected chestnuts and acorns.
    I enjoyed 1 hours pleasant walk.
    No English speaker around here.I don't know exactly.

    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Historical Travel
    • Budget Travel

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  • Otsuka museum of Western Art

    by hassy Written Sep 30, 2013
    concert in Sistine Chapel room
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    Before and after modification of "the Last Supper",
    "Sistine Chapel",
    Mural of the Church of Cappadocia,
    Murals of Pompeii,
    Mosaics of RavennaEEE

    You can see in one place.All-you-can-take photos. All-you-can-touch.
    They@are three-dimensional textbooks of art@made of colored ceramic plate the original painting.

    Museum is very wide. It is not enough in a day.
    Admission fee@is 3150 yen(about 30US$).Expensive,isn't it?
    I'd like to go again if admission fee is cheaper.

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    • Museum Visits
    • School Holidays

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  • DOLL FESTIVAL(GIRLS FESTIVAL)in KATSUURA

    by hassy Written Mar 23, 2013
    katsuura-sakamoto
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    March 3rd is tha traditional girls cerebrate day(boys day is May 5th),many famiries which have girls decorate dolls set(prince and princess,three ladies,five musicians,butlers,incruding anciant house facirilies )in their house.
    There is a famous doll festival in KATSUURA TOWN (it takes 1 hours from TOKUSHIMA-city by car),called "BIg Hina-matsuri" in order to hold a memorial service for dolls that finish role after girls grew up,started 25years ago.Now become a big event for cerebrate spring come.
    It decorate from late Febrary to early April.
    Holl's dolls piramid is grate,but I recommend to visit "sakamoto-district"

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    • Historical Travel
    • Festivals
    • Road Trip

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  • TEBAJIMA island

    by hassy Written Mar 1, 2013
    tebajima island whale scape(photo's photo)
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    It takes 1h"30 to MUGI town from TOKUSHIMA city, by car or train.If you take train,you reach mugi statioin.and take a walk about 1 km to mugi port,and take 15 minnute boat to TEBAJIMA island.

    There is a natural treasure some kind of seaweed called SHIRATAMAMO , near extinction as a seed "living fossil" .
    You can see these only in Libya of North Africa, Mauritius on the Indian Ocean, New Caledonia peace on the ocean, and TEBAJIMA island in Japan.
    (To tell the truth,The thing of only that .)

    This is a small island only with 4 km of round . You can easily take a walk trail about 1 hour.
    If you want to see SHIRATAMAMO seaweed,you have to wear the shoes along which it is easy to walk along rocks.

    The center of the island is just around the port,no cars , small shop,I watched the scenery of the old fishing village. I reccomend you to buy something to eat before crossing to an island.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Fishing

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    Enjoy the Iya On-Sen (Hot springs spa)

    by dlandt Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Iya On-Sen
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    The Iya On-Sen is a small hotel and spa that is centered around some natural hot springs. Although they have piped the water into comfortable tubs, they don't purify the water or regulate the temperature in any way. The springs are located down next to the river, so you need to ride a cable car down from the road (Y1500 or $14).

    As in most On-Sens (public baths) this is done in the buff, so if you are afraid of nakedness this one wouldn't be for you, even though everyone is so well behaved that I actually saw fathers bring very young daughters into the water without, apparently , a second thought.

    The water tubs look out onto some pretty great scenery, and are segregated by sex at the adult level. They aren't, however, truly sheltered from the elements, making my December visit a chilling experience indeed. The lockers are not heated either, but a visit any other time of the year (and they are closed January and February) should be OK.

    The water here feels wonderful, and has the pure snmell of natural sulphur that mingles with the clean air of the Japanese mountains. Everyone stares at you because you aren't Japanese and also at your tattoos, which are something of a culture shock for them, but overall it is a peaceful and relaxing day trip from Tokushima.

    Related to:
    • Spa and Resort
    • Adventure Travel
    • Eco-Tourism

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    Tokushima Castle Museum

    by dlandt Updated Sep 3, 2010

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    Museum exterior
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    My first three visits to Tokushima failed to see me inside the castle museum because we tend to visit aroudn New Years, when the museum, along with everything else, is closed. Eventually, I made it inside only to find the museum is limited ot three rooms, none of which are completely impressive. Still, the building is well maintained and has quite a bit of square footage, along with wonderful park grounds . The exterior eaves have a backwards swaztika, usually they are some kind of protection from demons but the sigil is also featured in some of the insignia inside, leading me to wonder if it is a symbol of the nearby whirlpools instead of the usual sun representation. Entrance to this kind of thing in Japan is usually pretty minimal, Y500-600 and this is no exception. Entry to the beautiful gardens is only 50Y.

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    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel

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    The nightlife district - Sakai Machi

    by dlandt Written Jan 11, 2008

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    A Sakai Machi sidestreet

    Sakai Machi is a district of Tokushima not far from downtown which features a large number of izakayas, soprans and pubs/bars all relatively close. Although dead during the day, it is the center of nightlife in the city, where Tokushima residents go to see and be seen, and where they go to get drunk. Much quieter and better behaved than the equivalents in the US and Europe, an evening here can be pleasant indeed if you can stand cigarette smoke for long periods of time. A few places are non-smoking but overall they follow the Japanese enthusiasm for tobacco with gusto. My brother in law found a mediocre gaijin bar to take me to, only to find it frequented by 20 year old Japanese with a joke of a menu. I was the only gaijiin there as might be expected given that there are probably fewer than 50 westerners living in the entire city. They also said that some Russians had opened a bar, though they didn't know where or if it was still in existence. Until last year the area featured a number of Chinese prostitutes making a quiet living, but the police had supposedly cleared them out. I myself saw no sign of prostitution in the district whatsoever.

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    • Arts and Culture

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    Visit the fish market

    by dlandt Written Jan 11, 2008
    Tuna sides
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    Although the Tokushima fish market doesn't differ significantly from other Japanese fish markets, it is a pleasant way to spend the morning. With fresh and live fish laid out on pallets and on tables, you wend your way through the stalls, inspecting everything from tiny minnows to huge tuna being carried on massive fishhooks and then sliced into steaks. I bought and later grilled an octopus, tako in Japanese, purchased live from a styrofoam container, a typical way to make a purchase. Live shrimp and huge scallops are the rule. Ugly blowfish are common, as are crabs and other shellfish. What isn't purchased in the morning will be found later in the day in supermarkets or restaurants. There are a limited number of small food vendors and a produce market with fish cakes and other cold edibles.

    Related to:
    • Food and Dining

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  • NARUTO GERMAN HOUSE

    by hassy Written May 22, 2006

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    german house

    End of World War I,Japan fights against German in Qingtao.
    Here was a German prisoners' camp.1917-1920.
    The German prisoners were free to communicate with local people.
    The German soldier taught a Japanese how to bake bread , music and some new sports.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

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    Drop by the farmer's market

    by dlandt Updated Jan 31, 2006

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    Farmer's Market
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    Although lacking some of the amenities and atmosphere of a grocery store, the produce is more or less the same or better, with each farmer putting his name on his own crop. What is imported is plainly labelled as being imported with the appropriate country specified.

    Because you are in Asia, a lot of the vegetables might seem strange to you, but they are usually variations of the vegetables you already know, such as daikon radish, it may be big and shaped funny, but it is still a radish and tastes quite similar to the radishes you are familiar with, though the Japanese use it very differently. If you are planning on visiting astuff like this you might want to visit an asian grocery store in your home country before you do since translations may or may not be readily available, especially in more rural locations.

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    • Eco-Tourism

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    Play Pachinko!

    by dlandt Written Jan 27, 2006

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    Pachinko sign

    Pachinko turned out to be something of a cross between a Las Vegas slot machine, a pinball game, and a video game. Essentially you use a stream of air to try and direct these little ball bearings into the right holes and when you get enough of them in there you can spin the slot wheel. The machine lights up, shouts "Craaaa-zee! Craaaa-zee!" in English and if you are lucky, starts spitting out all these little ball bearings which you scoop into plastic tubs. After you are done playing, they weigh these balls and give you cash. I won about $80.

    I was told pachinko parlors don't allow cameras for the same reason casinos don't, and I was also told that not all of these games are honest, with Korean proprietors getting a particularly bad rap. It is also something of an open secret that profits from some of these games go to support the North Korean government. Sometimes your game will be manipulated to win in the hope that you will come back and lose more, but I would guess that the reverse is more often the case. Pachinko is gambling, and whenever you gamble, know the odds are weighted in favor of the house.

    Pachinko is very popular in Japan and when you enter a parlor you will see people of all ages and social stratae playing. They tend to be pretty smoky, and you always have the feeling you are being watched, but for whatever reasons, the Japanese really like this game.

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    • Casino and Gambling

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    Awa-Odori Festival Museum and Demo

    by dlandt Written Jan 27, 2006

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    Female dancers with their traditional hats
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    The Awa-Odori is pretty much Tokushima's only claim to fame in Japan. it is a huge dance festival which draws people from all over Japan and even has a troupe of gaijin dancers. When they dance, they dance in a certain way, and you can see it demonstrated downtown on a daily basis. Sadly, everything is in Japanese, which meant I learned almost nothing from the 20 minutes I spent listening to the MC. The dancers, however, did manage to convey a good impression of what the dance was like even if you had to imagine what thousands of dancers would be like.

    During one segment of the show the audience is invited to participate, but if you haven't been able to understand the MC, you won't understand the dance and just look foolish. My wife, Miyuki, daned in this festival when she was a girl, and had no trouble. I..... looked foolish.

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    • Festivals

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    Walk across the Kazurabashi Bridge

    by dlandt Written Jan 26, 2006

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    The Kazurabashi Bridge
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    This bridge is made of natural vine and is rebuilt every three years. It is high up in the mountains and the trip up to it is as exciting as the bridge itself. We drove through a lot of these really cool little mountain towns. I wouldn't say hiking across the bridge is for everyone, since the slats are some number of inches apart. I definitely wouldn't take a toddler across because they would ber small enough to fall through. Even carried in my arms it would be difficult since the bridge sways a lot and you have to brace yourself. I think the charge was about Y500 or about $4.65.

    The bridge is quite old and is quasi-historical and partly speculative local legend, part of the reason they keep rebuilding it. A sign said the other reason is to preseve the vine-working skills. There are two other bridges in addition to thias one, with West Iya being the more frequented.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • National/State Park
    • Arts and Culture

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    Deutsche Village

    by dlandt Updated Jan 26, 2006

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    Deutsche Village
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    A footnote in history teaches us that Japan entered WWI on the side of the allies and cleaned up Germany's colonies in the Pacific. In Tokushima, that footnote is written a bit larger, because they had one of six POW camps which held the captured Germans. In contrast to WWII, and for reasons not entirely clear to me, the Japanese treated their POWs quite well and allowed them to establish what was in essence a small German village where they practiced their own arts such as forming a symphony orchestra, and baked bread, made beer and sausage etc. At the end of the war, the Germans left quite pleased with their interaction with the Japanese and left them to go about their Weimar, Nazi and Wiederaufbau fates as destiny decreed until 1963, when a group of former POWs contacted the Japanese and revisited the site, which was eventually dedicated as a cross between a historical landmark and a German-Japanese cultural center.

    There are a number of displays here, as well as a lot of historical documentation. No one speaks German and there is no German staff, but they do sell German goods (chocolate, wine, streudel etc.), including beer, a welcome relief from what the Japanese drink. There is also a mannequin symphony playing Strauss.

    Japan is one of the only countries I know of which has elevated Germany's hochkultur with those of Italy and France. Uniquely, you can see cafes proudly displaying German names and decorations in equal number to those of the more common countries as well as other telling signs. The Japanese, in conversation, really expressed an admiration for and spiritual kinship with the Germans and countries they associate with a greater German cultural sphere, like the Netherlands, Switzerland, Austria and Scandinavia.

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    • Historical Travel

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    Tokushima Cultural Center for local arts & crafts

    by dlandt Updated Jan 25, 2006

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    Indigo dye workshop
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    Like anyplace in the old world, there is always a strong local identity in Japan and Tokushima is no exception. To sort of celebrate and promote their local identity the city has set up a cultural center which has a few different aspects to it. One area is kind of a pica flea market and is of little interest to the non-antique-dealing public at large. Outside of that are people who have set up booths which promote products of their own innovation or manufacture. I got some small dried spiced scallops that you can just toss into your rice cooker there but few people in Japan would recognize it.

    The last and most important section is the permanent brick and mortar facility which promotes, displays, sells, and exhibits different local handicrafts such as kite making, indigo dye craft, rice paper art and other things that Tokushima is known for. Each of the rooms also offers pottery-class style workshops for those who care for them, including you. Check the schedule for class times and costs. They also sell local but packaged food specialties.

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    • Arts and Culture

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