Harajuku Local Customs

  • Turtle Stone, a Luck Stone?
    Turtle Stone, a Luck Stone?
    by taigaa001
  • Washing of hands and hearts
    Washing of hands and hearts
    by bpacker
  • Gateway to the Meiji Shrine, Tokyo
    Gateway to the Meiji Shrine, Tokyo
    by victorwkf

Most Recent Local Customs in Harajuku

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    Kameishi (Turtle Stone)

    by taigaa001 Written Aug 5, 2013
    Turtle Stone, a Luck Stone?

    Japanese word "Kame" encompasses both tortoises and turtles. Because of the reptile's long life span, both turtles and tortoises have been treasured as the symbols of longevity and prosperity. In Japanese gardens of major shrines and temples, tortoises are often kept as pets. Kameishi is either a set of stones or one large huge stone shaped like a turtle. These stones are often paired with Crane stone(s) the symbol of longevity and maritime fidelity. There is even a Japanese phrase "Tsuru-wa-sennen, Kame-wa-mannen(Cranes live for one thousand years and turtles 10,000 years). The turtle stone located near the North Pond is about 2 meters long. Some people believe that this stone permeates vigor while children enjoy playing on and around the stone.

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  • victorwkf's Profile Photo

    Big Traditional Drum

    by victorwkf Written Oct 8, 2005

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    A big traditional drum at Meiji Shrine, Tokyo

    There is a big traditional drum located at the Meiji Shrine which is rather colourful and impressive. Big traditional drums are rather popular in Eastern Asian countries such as Japan, Korea, China and Mongolia which I have all visited.

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    Traditional Japanese Weddings

    by victorwkf Written Oct 7, 2005

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    Traditional Japanese wedding at Meiji Shrine, Toky

    It seems that the Meiji Shrine is a popular place for traditional Japanese weddings as I was lucky to catch one during my visit there. More photos of the wedding are at the travelogue section of this VT page.

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    • Festivals
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

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    Wash your hearts and hands

    by bpacker Updated Apr 13, 2004

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    Washing of hands and hearts

    Just before you enter a Japanese Shrine, you will see several wooden dippers and a a basin overflowing with water. Now before you take a sip from those dippers, take note that they're for ritual cleansing purposes. You're supposed to wash your hands and symobolically wash your hearts before you enter the holy place. Do that and serenity will come on you when you enter the shrine.

    Bpacker's Harajuku Page

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  • victorwkf's Profile Photo

    Making a wish, traditional style

    by victorwkf Written Oct 7, 2005

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    Making a wish, traditional Japanese style

    It seems that you can make a wish in the Japanese traditional style at the Meiji Shrine and they will put it into wooden plates like the ones in the photo.

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    • Arts and Culture

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    Water for cleansing

    by victorwkf Written Oct 7, 2005

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    Water for cleansing at Meiji Shrine, Tokyo

    Before entering the main shrine, devotees are supposed to wash their hands using the water from a traditional sink located outside the shrine as shown in this photograph.

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    • Religious Travel
    • Arts and Culture

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    Entrance to Meiji Shrine

    by victorwkf Written Oct 7, 2005

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    Gateway to the Meiji Shrine, Tokyo

    As in all other Japanese temples and shrines, the entrance to the Meiji Shrine is marked by a traditional Japanese gate which is very tall and impressive.

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    • Arts and Culture
    • Religious Travel

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Harajuku Local Customs

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