Getting Around, Tokyo

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    toll?
    by machomikemd
  • Getting Around
    by machomikemd
  • mutilevel
    mutilevel
    by machomikemd
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    Koban (Japanese Police)

    by machomikemd Written Oct 29, 2009

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    the koban
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    Favorite thing: what makes police in tokyo unique is the Koban System wherein a Koban is a typically a two-storied housing with a couple of rooms with from one to more than ten police oficers. The officers in these buildings can keep watch, respond to emergencies, give directions, and otherwise interact with citizens on a more intimate basis than they could from a more distant station and when tourist like us needs information or directions, they come in very handy but remember that not all police speak english.

    An English-language line to the Metropolitan Police is available from Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 5:15 p.m., at 03-3501-0110.

    Fondest memory: there are over 1,200 Koban in Tokyo alone. While not all Koban are staffed 24 hours a day, most of the police boxes located in heavily populated areas will have an officer on duty. In the most popular tourist areas like Ginza, Roppongi or Shinjuku, for example, there may be someone who can help you in English, and they may have forms and other documents available in English as well.

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    the Highways of Tokyo

    by machomikemd Written Oct 29, 2009

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    to downtown
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    Favorite thing: what the difference of the highways of tokyo from other areas? well aside from being very clean, the highways of tokyo are multivel, i mean mutilevel wherein sometimes there will be 2 or three elevated lanes going at the same direction and also on opposite direction and some are situated above rivers wherein they are constructed above the rivers and follow it's course. another peculiar thing about the japanese highways is that many sections have tolls and i mean many unlike in other areas where only a handful of highways have tolls. a basic toll charge here is about 700 yen and goes up when you are driving a van or a truck so many people really use the public transport instead of using cars to drive in tokyo so you now know that tokyo has high gas prices and many toll roads so it is more practical to take the efficient and cheap public transport around tokyo right!

    Fondest memory: again very expensive gas and expensive tolls on highways!

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    Narita International Airport

    by machomikemd Updated Oct 27, 2009

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    yokoso
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    Favorite thing: it serves as the gateway to tokyo and the nearby Kanto Plain. Haneda Airport in Downtown tokyo serves mainly as a domestic terminal and as international terminal to flights from south korea and china. Narita Airport has two separate terminals with separate underground train stations. Connection between the terminals is by shuttle bus (buses are available both inside and outside the security area) and trains; there is no pedestrian connection.

    At present, Narita Airport has two rail connections, operated by Keisei Electric Railway and JR East. A third line, the Narita Rapid Railway, is currently under construction and scheduled for completion in 2010. Trains to and from Narita stop at Narita Airport Station in Terminal 1 and Airport Terminal 2 Station in Terminal 2.

    Phone: +81(0)476-34-8000
    Website: www.narita-airport.jp.eng

    Fondest memory: Transporation to/from Narita Airport

    JR Narita Express (NEX)

    About 3000 yen, 60 minutes to central Tokyo. Departures every 30-60 minutes
    The Narita Express is a fast and comfortable airport train into central Tokyo (serving Tokyo, Shinagawa, Shinjuku and Ikebukuro Stations), the Tokyo Tama region, Yokohama and Saitama. All seats are reserved. Thanks to the NEX & Suica package, the Narita Express can also be a relatively economical airport access option.

    JR Sobu Line (Rapid Service)

    About 1300 yen, 85 minutes to central Tokyo.Departures every 60 minutes
    The Rapid Sobu Line is the inexpensive JR alternative to the Narita Express, connecting the airport with Tokyo Station and Yokohama. The Rapid Sobu Line is a normal commuter train, which stops at several stations between the airport and Tokyo and can become crowded during rush hours. Seat reservations are not possible.

    Keisei Skyliner

    About 2000 yen, 60 minutes to central Tokyo. Departures every 40 minutes
    The Keisei Skyliner connects the airport with Ueno Station in central Tokyo. It is a comfortable train for travelers to and from the airport. All seats are reserved.

    Keisei Limited Express

    About 1000 yen, 75 minutes to central Tokyo. Departures every 20 minutes
    The inexpensive alternative to the Keisei Skyliner, the Keisei Limited Express is the cheapest way to get from the airport into Tokyo. It is a normal commuter train, which stops at several stations between the airport and Tokyo and can become crowded during rush hours. Seat reservations are not possible.

    Limousine Bus

    About 3000 yen, 60-90 minutes to central Tokyo
    Several bus companies offer connections to various places in the Tokyo area and neighboring prefectures, including direct connections to major hotels.

    Taxi
    About 20,000 yen, 60-90 minutes to central Tokyo
    Because Narita Airport is located about 60 km outside of Tokyo, a taxi ride into central Tokyo is very expensive and not recommended to common travelers.

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    Walking in Tokyo

    by SfumatoPants Written Sep 15, 2008

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    Favorite thing: I am a walker. That is my bias. I love to get out on foot and explore the everyday things that a city offers, urban orienteering. Whenever I go to a new city I always look for a central location from which I can walk to many of the popular tourist spots, limiting my need for train or taxi travel.
    I have walked many times from Ueno down to Shinbashi station on the Yamanote line, the Eastern side of "downtown" Tokyo. This area has the greatest concentration of tourist spots in the city so walking is fairly easy, if you feel comfortbale walking in a 5K radius.
    If you like to explore by walking then I would suggest you stay on the East side of the Yamanote, somewhere around Tokyo Station (I personaly like Shinabshi/Shiodome, because it offers me easy connections to wherever I want to go).
    The Western side of the Yamanote has it's charms, but they are further apart and better explored by train or taxi. I use the Eastern side as a base and make day trips over to the Western side as I need to.
    By the way, one of my favorite walks, is around the Yanaka Cemetary at Nippori station. When you leave the cemetary and walk West, into the Yamanote ring you enter the really old parts of Tokyo. Here you can find such obscure historical sights as the tomb of the 47 Ronin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forty-seven_Ronin).

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    Use a backpack not a wheelie bag

    by joiwatani Written Aug 2, 2008

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    The shinkansen/train underground map
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    Favorite thing: These are the things that we have to consider in this question:
    1. wheelie bags vs. back pack in Japan - remember, it's Japan- not other places.
    2. staircases
    3. crowded trains
    4. airport and around the country of Japan

    Japan has many staircases. If you look at the tunnel routes of the shinkansen, it is crazy. You get lost inside the tunnel just figuring out where to exit! You don't read and write in Japanese. That's even adding to your challenge of carrying a wheelie! Because of those staircases, you will end up carrying your wheelie because you can't wheel anyway because of those staircases!

    Having a backpack is easier! The train stations are always crowded in Tokyo! The people move fast and if you have a wheelie, you will be dragging it through the crowd!!!

    Check out the pictures I took how the train station look like in Tokyo. It has so many branches under the tunnel. To get out from the tunnel, you have to go through stairs! Just imagine wheeling through the stairs! By the time you have snaked in through the crowd to get out, you will be catching your breath once you see the light coming from that shinkansen/train!

    Fondest memory: I just love the food and shopping in Tokyo!

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    Use a backpack not a wheelie bag

    by joiwatani Written Aug 2, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The shinkansen/train underground map
    4 more images

    Favorite thing: These are the things that we have to consider in this question:
    1. wheelie bags vs. back pack in Japan - remember, it's Japan- not other places.
    2. staircases
    3. crowded trains
    4. airport and around the country of Japan

    Japan has many staircases. If you look at the tunnel routes of the shinkansen, it is crazy. You get lost inside the tunnel just figuring out where to exit! You don't read and write in Japanese. That's even adding to your challenge of carrying a wheelie! Because of those staircases, you will end up carrying your wheelie because you can't wheel anyway because of those staircases!

    Having a backpack is easier! The train stations are always crowded in Tokyo! The people move fast and if you have a wheelie, you will be dragging it through the crowd!!!

    Check out the pictures I took how the train station look like in Tokyo. It has so many branches under the tunnel. To get out from the tunnel, you have to go through stairs! Just imagine wheeling through the stairs! By the time you have snaked in through the crowd to get out, you will be catching your breath once you see the light coming from that shinkansen/train!

    Fondest memory: I just love the food and shopping in Tokyo!

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    Backpack is more convenient than a wheeler luggage

    by joiwatani Written Jul 13, 2008

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    Favorite thing: Backpack is better. There are many stairs in Japan because the train in Tokyo are underground - so you have to climb the stairs to get up to the level of the roads. Also, once you are in the shinkansen or train, it is more convenient for a traveller to have a backpack -easier to get in and out of the train. You have to be quick and fast in catching trains so to have a wheelie bag is not even an option - for me.

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    ...further more

    by SfumatoPants Written Mar 31, 2008

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    Favorite thing: Your criteria, King size room, don't apply to Japanese hotels. Hotels usually charge per person, and the number of beds in a room, single or double. If you expect any more you will have to go to a large International hotel chain, and you should expect to pay a lot more.

    If you really want my advice to have a nice stay, try my current favourite hotel - Park Hotel Shiodome - or across the street, the basic business hotel - Villa Fontaine Shiodome.

    Keep in mind that any money you save on a hotel will wind up being spent on transportation to and from that hotel. The cheaper a hotel is the further away from the "it" areas it will be. The Shiodome area is great for tourists as there is a lot to do within WALKING distance.

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    The rush

    by salisbury3933 Written Nov 20, 2007

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    Favorite thing: Rush time can be notoriously crowded, but much more so in the morning.

    What you'll find is that the commute home tends to be a lot more spaced out, in fact the last train home at night is often quite full.

    It may be best to avoid the morning rush, if you don't like such things, but the evening rush is much more manageable.

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    Yanaka5 Nezu Capel

    by rikoriko Written Jan 2, 2007

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    Nezu Capel

    Favorite thing: Japanese Old town still you can see in Tokyo!!

    If you have a time, pls try to visit Japanese old town, Yanaka where you can go there by subway, senndagi or nezu or you can also go there by JR, "Nippori station".

    It is very good for a walk.

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    Takeshita Street

    by saracen Updated Oct 13, 2006

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    Takeshita Street

    Favorite thing: I have been racking my brains, trying to work out how to include Takeshita Street into a tip - I could describe the bustling street of vendors, but all I can remember are the psychedelic clothes and tie-dye.

    I could write about the sheer number of bodies moving around, but that could be anywhere in Tokyo.

    In the end, I simply need to admit that the name appeals to my peurile, juvenile Scottish sense of humour.

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    Beating rush hour hell...

    by cheesecake17 Updated Feb 14, 2006

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    rush hour train

    Favorite thing:
    First dont get caught in rush hour on a Tokyo train.....avoid this as much as you can..:)...

    But if you do get on....well here are a few tips to get a sit......

    Stand near seated junior high or high school students, whose uniforms are a clear signal they will be only on for a short distance and likely to vacate their seats soon...

    Look at people who are sleeping, specially those who sit upright with their eyes lightly close are more likely to get off early...

    Also women who touch up their makeup are preapring to get off.....

    TOKYO METRO

    TOKYO METRO GUIDE

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    New trains along Yamanote Line

    by vincentf Written Jul 6, 2004

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    Yamanote Line

    Favorite thing: If you encounter the new sleek trains (E231 series) on the JR Yamanote Line, you'll be informed by both Japanese and English announcements. On top of each door, these LCD displays show you the entire loop and how long it takes to reach the destination.

    The LCD screen will also display the local weather, news and best of all, baseball box scores!

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    Finding an Address in Tokyo

    by kdoc13 Written May 24, 2004

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    Finding 19324 Hatchibori St isn't easy.

    Favorite thing: This is not my favorite thing about Tokyo, in fact it is my least favorite thing. When I work in Tokyo, I often find myself having to go to a building in some remote part of town. Often, since the company had to pay, I would take a taxi. Taxi's are great, but sometimes they don't even know where they are going.

    Case in point, if you ever get the urge to stay at the Best Western in Ikebukuro, don't give the taxi driver the address for the hotel. He won't be able to find it either. Instead, get plenty of landmarks from the hotel before you get there. This is true of many places.

    The reason for this is this, Roads are easy to find, although they may be twenty miles long. The buildings aren't numbered in order, instead, they are numbered in the order they are built. So building 2112 can be twenty miles away from 2113 on the same street.

    The landmark suggestion works well, as long as they are unique. If someone tells you to keep going until you see a McDonalds, or a Mos Burger, you may be in trouble, as they are probably on every block. Best bet, get detailed instructions with a lot of landmarks, and when in doubt, ask a local. If you can find a police officer that speaks english... well you are just plain lucky, but if you do, they will often be the best person to ask for directions.

    Fondest memory: The other way to find a building is to find the local mail agent. This is harder than it looks too. I was made the mail agent for my building. Basically, I got to distribute the mail after it arrived separated, but in bulk from the mail man. It is a worthless and evil job, but is has the one perk of knowing where everything around you is. If you can find the person with the mail, you can get anywhere in that area.

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    Think twice (provided you 've the capacity)

    by manuelEB Updated Sep 30, 2003

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    Taxi!!!!!

    Favorite thing: Tokyo, as every big city in Japan, enjoyes a very well developed public transportation system. Why then have we this colorful carnaval of taxies around stations? Good question!!! My guess is that the Japanes society see in punctuality an important matter. Sometimes you get into the taxi to get on time. One just rides for few blocks. When time and weather permited it, people prefers to walk. But do not get upset for the price!!!!

    Fondest memory: 650 yen for just few blocks could be a high price but that day your punctuality (your sense of responsability) wins at least 3000 ratings, from at least three different IP adress. Click. Click.

    The sense of discipline is also important. see how those taxies just queue waiting for customers. This world is not for the agressive drivers but for the patientes. Patience will turn into agrresivity once they get their customer. Like in every country and big city, taxi drivers are SOBber when they drive.

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