Akihabara, Tokyo

4 out of 5 stars 44 Reviews

Chiyoda-ku

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  • Akihabara
    by Ewingjr98
  • Akihabara
    by Ewingjr98
  • Akihabara
    by fachd
  • Anime galour in Akihabara

    by Jamponman Written Feb 3, 2013

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    This is the mecca for all gadget nerds out there. You will find pretty much any new high tech gadget you can imagine here. Some stores offer tax free goods, although the prices might be higher than other stores.
    To all robot interested, I can highly recommend "Kondo Robo Spot", which is a small store where you can try out their robots.
    If you are an anime fan, you will find anything related to anime here. Several buildings are crammed with small to large figurines, cards, toys etc. from top to bottom floor. However, expect it to be crowded on weekends.
    Close to the station there is a Gundam and AKB48 cafe. Expect to stand in line to get in if you come on a weekend.
    All over the place, you'll see girls dressed in cute dresses promoting their maid cafes. I'm not really sure what these cafes offer as I haven't visited one.
    Overall I would say it's worth to make a trip to Akihabara, you can also find some nice temples and restaurants in the area.

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  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    Akihabara Electric Town

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Jan 28, 2013
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    Akihabara Electric Town is known primarily for two things: it is the center of Japan's consumer electronic culture, as well as the center point for much of the city's anime and manga culture, including unusual "maid cafes."

    The electronics in the area are sold in huge megastores alongside small, locally owned shops. You can buy just about anything here including new and used cameras, computer parts, peripherals, video games, cellular phones, televisions, appliances and more.

    The anime culture is much more interesting. Here you can find collectible anime and manga items like figures, games, DVDs, etc. The odd thing here is the maid cafes, where local high school girls, often in their official school uniforms, work as hostesses for lonely male customers.

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    Maid Kissaten Cafe Craze

    by machomikemd Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    to Don Quijote Building and the maid cafe
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    due to the digital otaku craze in akihabara, maid cafes started sprouting in the early 2000's and are now popular places to unwind and eat. Maid Cafes are like Lounges which you pay by the hour and also offer internet, games, singing and a lot more, a basic charge is 700 yen per hour and you can order food and drinks and have pictures of your favorite maids for 500 yen, most don't have english speaking staff but here at Home Cafe, they have an english website so that is the one we went (they have 6 outlets in Akihabara but their branch here at the 5th floor of Don Quijote Building is the most popular!) but there are also others here like lamtarra, pinafore, cure and a lot more. Food and drinks are limited and expensive like spaghetti which is 1100 yen and iced tea at 500 yen and pork butadon at 100 yen but you dont go here just for the food but for the Maid and moe otaku experience!

    the maid cafés were originally designed primarily to cater to the fantasies of male otaku, obsessive fans of anime, manga and video games. The image of the maid is one that has been popularized and fetishized in many manga and anime series, as well as in gal games. Important to the otaku attraction to maid cafés is the Japanese concept of moe, which generally describes a fetish or love for anime, manga or video game characters. More specifically, moe refers to adoration for young or innocent-looking female characters. People who have moe (especially a specific subcategory known as maid moe) are therefore attracted to an establishment in which they can interact with real-life manifestations (both physically and in demeanor) of the fictional maid characters that they have fetishized.

    Today, the maid café phenomenon attracts more than just male otaku, but also couples, tourists, and women and especially me and my friend hehehe. Though the waitresses at maid cafés are sometimes interpreted as objects of romantic or sexual desire, they can also be viewed as simply aesthetically appealing figures.

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  • Akihabara

    by yen_2 Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Street Scene along Shinjuku-

    Akihabara-or the electronic town in Tokyo! Those who want to check-out the electronics made in Japan shouldn't miss out this area.A whole long wide street are offered for your fancy! The place couldn't be finished by a day if you want to check it one by one! But mind you, it's also expensive buying products here. There's a Duty free shop in here though.

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    Wander the streets od Akihabara

    by AKtravelers Written Mar 12, 2010

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    A crossing in Akihabara
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    If you're looking for a feel of modern, youthful Tokyo, you hardly can do better than Akihabara. This area of town also carries the moniker "Electric Town" and for good reason, as it is loaded with electronic stores, electronics hardware stores, computer game shops and outlets selling al sorts of software and video entertainment. The crowd on the sidewalks is thick, and almost entirely composed of twenty-somethings looking to add to their digital collections. There are lots of stores selling Japanese anime, as well as girls dressed up in anime costumes passing out advertising brochures. There's even an adult technology store, if you're into that kind of thing.

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  • machomikemd's Profile Photo

    Old Akiba Pictures & Current Akiba JR Station

    by machomikemd Updated Dec 10, 2009

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    old pic at Chuo Dori Street
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    from my old picture collections plus the Akihabara JR Station. Akihabara is centered around Akihabara Station, located on the JR Yamanote, Keihin-Tohoku, and Chuo Local lines. Just take the conveniently labeled "Akihabara Electric Town" exit to be dropped into the middle of the action and viola! on to the MAID CAFE'S for us heheheh but also to buy some electronic stuffs. Akihabara Station was opened in November 1890 as a freight terminal linked to Ueno Station station via tracks following the course of the modern day Yamanote Line. It was opened to passenger traffic in 1925 following the construction of the section of track linking Ueno with Shinbashi via Tokyo station and the completion of the Yamanote Line. Hundreds of electronics shops of various sizes can be found around Akihabara Station and along Chuo Dori (Chuo Avenue). They offer everything from the newest computers, cameras, televisions, mobile phones and home appliances to second-hand goods and electronic junk.

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  • machomikemd's Profile Photo

    A Revisit to the Akiba Electric Town

    by machomikemd Updated Oct 27, 2009

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    at akihabara
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    I've been here in 1986 and now for a revist mainly to try the Maid Kissaten Cafe Craze in good old akiba but still this district was made famous due to the assorted electronics and high tech gadgets that you can buy here. Akihabara is a major world famous shopping area for electronic, computer, anime, and otaku goods, including new and used items. New items are mostly to be found on the main street, Chûôdôri, with many kinds of used items found in the back streets of Soto Kanda 3-chôme. First-hand parts for PC-building are readily available from a variety of stores. Tools, electrical parts, wires, microsized cameras and similar items are found in the cramped passageways of Soto Kanda 1-chôme (near the station). A few major stores, such as Ishimaru Denki, Sofmap and Laox operate multiple branch stores mainly along the main roads, while many smaller shops can be found in the narrow side streets.

    Note that some of the electronic appliances on sale are only suited for use in Japan due to voltage and other technical differences and limited warranty. However, several stores also feature a selection of products for overseas use and offer duty free shopping to foreign tourists on purchases of over 10,000 Yen (passport required). I bought a 16 gigabyte Sony Memory stick for only 8,500 yen and my friend bought a 16 gig sd card at only 5,000 yen (caveat, they offer no international foreign warranties on most items so you buy at your own risk).

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  • sinjabc's Profile Photo

    Akihabara

    by sinjabc Written Oct 25, 2009
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    Akihabara is the electronics district and has hundreds of shops for electronics, pachinko parlours, collector shops and Maid Cafes. You can spend hours here wandering through the shops. Unless you are looking for something in particular, I would suggest having a quick look around and moving on.

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  • Wild_Orchid's Profile Photo

    Visit Akihabara

    by Wild_Orchid Updated Jun 20, 2009

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    in anime costumes near Akihabara JR station
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    Akihabara is the famous "electric street" where you'll find all things electronic. It is also affectionately known as "akiba" by the Japanese.

    There are personal gadgets such as digital cameras, IPODS, video cameras, handphones, PCs, notebooks and more. You'll also find parts for digital cameras, wires for computers, & used cameras and camera parts. General electrical household items may also be found here.

    Big names here are LAOX which features a multi-storey shop selling all kinds of electrical and electronic items. You can handle & test the digital cameras & digital Video cameras out. I tried quite a few out myself. The default setting was in Japanese, but you can try to ask for the staff to change the language setting to Chinese (Mandarin or simplified Chinese) or English or other languages.

    The time I was there, a bunch of ladies in Anime costume were on hand just outside the JR station handing out flyers.

    *Update* (2009): I've found a very useful website which tells you how to plan 1/2 day visit of Akihabara and Ueno. Please click on the link below to have a look at the map.

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  • fachd's Profile Photo

    The largest electronics town in the world

    by fachd Updated Jun 13, 2009

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    As soon as we came out from the Akihabara train station, the first I noticed was the large crowd. Colourful buildings billboard showing advertisement mainly in Japanese; I assume the ads is for electronics product.

    On the day the weather was uncomfortable, it was drizzling. I am not madly keen in electronics but I must admit Akihabara got me excited. There were electronic products I’ve never seen before in Australia, talking robotic toys on display, latest video and digital camera, plasma and LCD television, computers, games, electronic toilet seats and so on.

    As we walk around the blocks every now and then you’ll see a see people on the street dressed as popular Japanese animation hero characters, people trying to lure you to their shops. We also noticed all of the shops we visited the staffs all spoke English and other foreign language. You’ll also find larger store along Chuo Dori Avenue and there are many mega store. We saw a few of the popular waitresses dressed in maid costumes and shops you would find in red light district, hmm I wonder what electronic gadget they sell.

    The competition is fierce between shops at Akihabara, but I found for the same product it is cheaper in Australia.

    Even though we are not into electronic we have visited and experienced the largest electronics town in the world.

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    Akihabara and Senso-Ji

    by boltonian Written Apr 17, 2009

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    Senso-Ji Pagoda

    The main appeal of this area is the largest temple in Tokyo. Surrounded by quaint tourist filled streets, the temple has a huge gateway enterance, and 5 storie pagoda. Sadly, the temple was covered in scaffolding when I visited but the area still had great appeal.

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  • AusPinay's Profile Photo

    AKIHABARA- FOR GAMERS and ELECTRONIC MANIACS

    by AusPinay Updated Feb 1, 2009

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    huge, tall & colourful buildings line the street
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    For a family with three boys (that includes my hubby) who are all electronic mad, a visit to this ELECTRIC TOWN was FULLY SICK, as my eldest said.

    In fact we went back there twice, which is uncommon as we never went to the same place/ attraction twice, believe me as there are lots more places to see in Tokyo and surrounds!

    Even before you step out of the train station, you will sense heaps of people converging in one area alone towards the left side so the best thing is follow where the locals are going!

    There are hundreds of electronic shops selling the latest cameras and gadgets, accessories, mobile phones, gaming consoles, etc, etc..ad infinitum. The duty free shops and other outlets will indicate if the goods are ready for use overseas too so don't fret!(No worries, there are also lots of eateries- selling all kinds of food as always!)

    My kids were just so happy looking at all the available new games for their PS3 and Nintendo DS Lite gaming machines! We didn't get any as most are in Japanese but we did get accessories for their DS Lite consoles.

    The women are not forgotten as they sell the latest appliances for the kitchen and for beauty enhancement. Even clothes can be bought there too! The prices vary so it is a good idea to shop around but as we were pressed for time I just tried to compare the prices back in Sydney! The WII and the PS3 are cheaper already in Australia!

    It is the accessories that are awesome, the variety of designs are just too much for the eyes to take in one day! My youngest also got some figures of his fave anime characters.

    AKIHABARA is becoming the center of anime also in Japan. Lots of shops carry just little figurines of various animation characters and games!

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  • aukahkay's Profile Photo

    Otaku culture in Akhihabara

    by aukahkay Written Apr 17, 2008

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    Otaku in Akhihabara - these 2 are guys
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    An `otaku' is a person who is a fanatic of a certain hobby. In Japan, it usually refers to a anime, game or manga fan. Akhihabara is the electronics capital of Japan. On Sundays, the main street in Akhihabara is closed to traffic and you can wander freely around. Besides the numerous computer, anime and game shops, there are also youngers and teens dressed up in their favourite manga or anime character. Here are some pictures of otaku at Akhihabara. There are also cafes in Akhihabara which are otaku cafes. The waitresses are dressed in anime costume and act out their assumed anime roles while interacting with customers. Unfortunately, everything is in Japanese.

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  • leanne_pearc's Profile Photo

    Stepping into the Gaming Zone

    by leanne_pearc Written Apr 5, 2008

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    Gaming!

    Akiabara also known as electronic city is filled with gaming, anime, all types of electronics, collectibles associated with anime and anime porn stores. Most shop people don't speak English so it was difficult to find out about there latest electronics however it was great to walk through!

    The maid cafes are also located in this area. We managed to find one, using a Japanese map, just to have a look. It was slightly expensive for us to go in.

    After my visit i bought a wii and now im addicted to games!

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  • dancinbudgie's Profile Photo

    Electronics and Manga

    by dancinbudgie Written Mar 5, 2008

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    If you are looking for thingamajigs, doohickies or watchamacallits, then this is the area to head to. It is a rabbit warren of little shops selling all things electrical and a great place to have a wander thru and just soak up the atmosphere. There are also a number of places selling manga comics. It is really crowded though, so if you're claustophobic beware!

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