Imperial Palace East Gardens, Tokyo

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Chiyoda, Chiyoda-ku

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  • Viewing Budokan Arena from Donjon Base
    Viewing Budokan Arena from Donjon Base
    by taigaa001
  • Ninomaru Garden in East Garden
    Ninomaru Garden in East Garden
    by taigaa001
  • East Garden: Donjon Base of Edo Castle
    East Garden: Donjon Base of Edo Castle
    by taigaa001
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    Outer Gardens of Imperial Palace: Overview

    by taigaa001 Written Sep 3, 2013

    When Tokyo tourists say " I went to Imperial Palace". it means that they went to either of outer gardens of Imperial Palace open to public. Imperial Palace where Imperial Family reside is still no-go place and some part of the Palace is open only on January 2 and December 23(current Emperor's birthday). There are three outer gardens which serve as public parks.

    1 Kokyo Gaien National Garden: Imperial Palace Park
    It is a huge park filled with excellently trimmed pines. It is the place where you can peek through former Edo Castle area currently Imperial Family Residence. The northwestern part of the park is the best place to view Nijuubashi, two bridges which has long been one of the postcard views of Tokyo.
    2 Kokyo Higashi Gyoen: Imperial Palace East Garden
    It is the place where former Edo castle main buildings used to stand. Ninomaru garden is great as well
    3 Kitanomaru Park
    It is known as the place where Budokan Arena is located.

    Huge park with the great views of Imperial Palace Nijubashi Bridge Ninomaru Garden in East Garden East Garden: Donjon Base of Edo Castle Viewing Budokan Arena from Donjon Base
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    Imperial Palace East Garden (Kokyo Higashi Gyoen)

    by Ewingjr98 Written Jan 1, 2013

    The Imperial Palace's East Garden -- or Kōkyo Higashi Gyoen in Japanese -- were once key defenses of the Edo Castle, but are today public gardens in the heart of Tokyo. Here guests can visit a number of historical relics such as the palace moats, guard towers, barracks, gates and walls that made up the inner two rings of defenses for the emperor and his family.

    The East Garden became a public park in 1968 after the new Imperial Residence was completed in the 1960s following the destruction of World War II. Today the area still houses some public buildings and dminsitrative facilities for the Imperial family such as the Imperial Tokagakudo Music Hall, the Music Department of the Board of Ceremonies of the Imperial Household, the Archives and Mausolea Department of the Imperial Household Agency, and the Museum of the Imperial Collections.

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Tokyo Imperial Gardens

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Mar 3, 2012

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    Tokyo Imperial is the main residence of the Emperor of Japan. It is a large park-like area located in the Chiyoda area close to Tokyo Station and contains several buildings including the main palace, the private residences of the imperial family, an archive, museum and administrative offices.
    It is built on the site of the old Edo castle. The total area including the gardens is about 3.5 square kilometres.
    The present Imperial Palace encompasses the retrenchments of the former Edo Castle. The modern palace Kyûden for various imperial court functions is located in the old Nishinomaru, while the residence of the emperor and empress is located in the Fukiage Gardens.

    PS: Photos aren't mine (see Tourist Trap Tip), but I have taken the same shots...

    Tokyo Imperial Gardens Tokyo Imperial Gardens Tokyo Imperial Gardens Tokyo Imperial Gardens Tokyo Imperial Gardens
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    Imperial East Garden

    by Rabbityama Written Jan 25, 2012

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    The Imperial East Garden is part of the Imperial Palace but it stands outside of the modern residence and is open to visitors without reservation. The park features gardens and ruins from Edo Castle which was home to the Tokugawa shogunate from the 17th century to the 19th century. The Emperor also lived here temporarily before the Imperial Palace was built nearby.

    In the center stands the walls from the castles donjon which burned down and was never rebuilt. From atop the ruins, there is a great view over the expansive lawn in front and the skyscrapers in the distance. There is a concert hall, museum of Imperial artifacts/objects, and guardhouses within the grounds as well as a plum grove and other gardens. It's a pretty place to walk around and entrance is free so it's worth it as part of a visit to the Imperial Palace.

    Hours vary by season and the Imperial East Garden is closed on Mondays and Fridays as well as New Years.

    Imperial East Garden from Castle Ruins Guardhouse in Imperial East Garden Yellow Gingko in Late December Imperial East Garden Ruins of Edo Castle in Imperial East Garden
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  • jlanza29's Profile Photo

    A great walk in the center of Tokyo !!!!

    by jlanza29 Written Apr 30, 2010

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    Covering the eastern part of the Imperial palace grounds the eastern gardens is well worth a visit. Admission price is FREE so take some time to walk around and if your here at the right time to see the cherry blossoms... we took our time and it we were there about 2 hours... it's a nice way to spend a lazy afternoon

    My sister smelling the cherry blossoms

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  • AKtravelers's Profile Photo

    The World's Busiest City's Peaceful Place

    by AKtravelers Written Aug 15, 2009

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    If you are looking for peace, quiet and a quintessential Japanese garden experience, then head straight for the center of Tokyo, where the Imperial palace Gardens look to shoeld you from all the urban bustle. One of the city's great lungs, the Imperial Palace Gardens offer plum blossoms (if you're there in the spring), open fields and a peaceful Japanese koi pond surrounded by blooming bushes. It's free, so you'll see lots of locals escaping to relax in the calm.
    One intersting note is that the Imperial Palace Garden has a tree representing all of Japan's prefectures. That's amazing, given the vast north-to-south expanse covered by Japan. But you can see cyclide from Okinawa along side some type of tree from Hokkaido (forgive me: not a botanist!).

    A summer day in a Japanese garden Julia and Janet observe the koi Lovers chat in the garden Bamboo! Julia feeds the koi at the Imperial place
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    The Otemon gate

    by fachd Written Jun 8, 2009

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    The Otemon gate was destroyed in 1945 and reconstructed in 1968. Historically Otemon gate was important gate and was used by the noblemen presenting themselves to the Shogun. Today the Otemon gate is still important as it is still use as the main gate to enter East Garden.

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    The East Gardens

    by fachd Written Jun 8, 2009

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    The East Gardens is next and part of the Imperial Palace and open to public. Historically it was the former site of defensive circle and the shogun's castle of Edo who later became the Imperial Palace.

    Today the East Gardens is more like a large park painted with beautiful traditional Japanese gardens, a small forest, ceremony tea house, stone remnants of Edo Castle and three historical gates the Otemon, Hirakawamon and Kitahanebashimon. We entered from Otemon gates. The garden consists of ponds with bridges and waterfalls, Japanese carps swimming under the water lilies, well cut hedges surrounded by colourful flowers, well pruned pine trees and cherry blossoms. In the Ninomaru Garden is Suwa no chaya teahouse. The East Gardens is a nice location for a walk or to relax and enjoy the surrounding.

    Business Hours 9:00am-4:30pm; Closed Mon & Fri
    Price Admission: FREE

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    Have a distant look at the Imperial Palace !

    by WStat Written Apr 26, 2008

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    The Imperial Palace (Kokyo) is located on the former site of Edo Castle, a large park area surrounded by moats and massive stone walls in the center of Tokyo, a short walk from Tokyo station. It is the residence of Japan's Imperial Family.

    Edo was once the castle of the Tokugawa shogun, who ruled Japan from 1603 until 1867. In 1868, the shogun was deposed, the shogunate finished and the country's capital and Imperial Residence were moved from Kyoto to Tokyo. In 1888 the construction of a new Imperial Palace was completed. It has been destroyed during World War Two, but rebuilt in the same style.
    The palace and inner gardens are not open to the public. Only on January 2 (New Year's Greeting) and December 23 (Emperor's Birthday), visitors are able to enter the inner palace grounds and see the members of the Imperial Family, who make several public appearances on a balcony.

    Tokyos Imperial Palace from the East Garden
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    A moment of rest in the gardens

    by kevin407 Written Sep 22, 2007

    There is something about a Japanese garden that is… well… relaxing. I am not a garden person and I don’t care about flowers. Yet I spent hours walking and sitting in the Imperial Palace Gardens. Maybe it was just because I was exhausted. It was the end of my trip and the press of street chaos had taken its toll.

    Wait until the city is starting to feel oppressive. Let the noise and the fumes and deluge of people exhaust you. Then find the gardens. Pick a quiet spot and listen to the trickle of water.

    You may find peace.

    Flowers and calm Trees not giant video screens
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  • stavrospar's Profile Photo

    Imperial Palace

    by stavrospar Written Nov 6, 2006

    I would not suggest you to go there, unless you are obsessed with gardens. It's free to enter, however there is nothing to do. There is no access to the palace...and actually you cannot even see it. I would say it's waste of time.

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  • Rodan44's Profile Photo

    Imperial Palace East Gardens (Kokyo Higashi Gyoen)

    by Rodan44 Written Dec 10, 2004

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    The Imperial Palace East Gardens (Kokyo Higashi Gyoen) are a part of the inner palace area and are open to the public. The East Gardens are the former site of Edo Castle's innermost circles of defense, the honmaru (main circle) and ninomaru (secondary circle). None of the main buildings remain today, but the moats, walls, entrance gates and several guardhouses can still be seen.

    Edo Castle was the residence of the Tokugawa shogun who ruled Japan from 1603 to 1867. Emperor Meiji also resided there from 1868 to 1888 before moving to the newly constructed Imperial Palace.

    A wide lawn and the remaining foundation of the former castle tower can be found on top of the hill, where the castle's innermost buildings once stood. The castle tower was completed in 1638 as the tallest castle tower in Japan's history. But only a few years later in 1657, it was destroyed by citywide fires and was never rebuilt.

    In place of the former buildings in the secondary circle of defense (ninomaru) at the foot of the hill, a tranquil Japanese-style garden has been created.

    Imperial Palace East Gardens, Tokyo
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    The Imperial Palace East Gardens

    by kdoc13 Written May 22, 2004

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    Unlike the Imperial Palace itself, the East Gardens are open to the public year round. The gardens are a part of most Tokyo city tours, but are also available to those traveling on their own.

    There are many beautiful places to see in the gardens including a small waterfall that cascades into the pond below. The garden is a recent thing (as in within the last 100 years) and is well kept. It stands on a defensive area where Edo Castle once stood.

    The best photo I have ever taken.
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  • MyPegasus's Profile Photo

    Imperial Place and East Garden

    by MyPegasus Written Apr 24, 2004

    The imperial Place itselves accepts visitors only two times a year beginning of the year. (1st week of January) Normally only the Garden is free for visitors. It is really remerkable in spring time. I saw also some pictures taken in winter and it really looks good as well. Definetely a "must" place for tourists

    East Garden
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  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    Edo Castle

    by keeweechic Updated Aug 1, 2003

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    Edo Castle with its moats and fortifications was the residence of the Tokugawa Rules for 265 years and after 1868 the residence of Japan’s emperors. In its heyday, it was understandably the greatest castle in Japan. Built in 1457 and was also called Chiyoda Castle, it consisted of a great many courts.

    After the collapse of Tokugawa Shogunate in 1868, the castle was confiscated by the new government and become the Imperial Palace. Today the inner (first) court is occupied by the Imperial Household Department, the west court by the current Imperial Palace and the third court by ministerial offices. Most of the land is now owned by the municipality of Tokyo..

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