Meiji-Jingu Shrine, Tokyo

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Yoyogi Kamizono-cho, Shibuya-ku

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  • Inside the shrine
    Inside the shrine
    by Ewingjr98
  • Meiji Shrine
    Meiji Shrine
    by Rabbityama
  • A little girl plays while her sibling is dedicated
    A little girl plays while her sibling is...
    by Bunsch
  • fachd's Profile Photo

    Tranquillity

    by fachd Written Jun 6, 2009

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    Meiji Shrine was built dedicated to Emperor Meiji and his wife Empress Shoken for the Japanese people to pay respects and to enshrine their soul. He was the first emperor of modern Japan. He transformed feudal Japan to modern state and joined the world powers. Meiji Shrine was destroyed during Second World War and rebuilt in 1958.

    Meiji Shrine was our first introduction to Tokyo. It is a popular tourist destination and visited by many as spiritual, recreation and relaxation. The area is large (175 acres) and it can take few hours to observe the shrine. They are many aspects to see and to understand.

    Meiji Shrine is surrounded by forest with many different varieties of trees (365 different species). The trees were donated by people from all over Japan.

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  • clueless83's Profile Photo

    Not to be confused with the garden!

    by clueless83 Written May 5, 2009

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    Gateway to the shrine
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    We wanted to experience a little traditional Japanese culture in our short time in Tokyo and thought best to do it at the Meiji Jingu shrine. We ended up paying to get into the garden which in my opinion was a bit of a waste of time and money when the shrine we wanted to see was round the corner and free.

    Its a fairly peaceful area but we didn't spend too long here as it was pouring with rain.

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  • clueless83's Profile Photo

    Meiji Jingu Garden

    by clueless83 Written May 5, 2009

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    Don't be fooled by the smile, he's not happy!

    We thought that while in Tokyo it would be nice to visit one shrine so as we were planning on going to Harajuku we decided that the Meiji Jingu would be ideal. As we walked into the area we saw an entrance on our left and a little hut selling tickets. We bought two tickets for the garden and proceeded to walk about looking for the shrine. We walked and looked and got lost. No shrine. We later found out that the shrine wasn't in the garden, it was straight on round the corner, not left as we had gone.

    If you like gardens you might like the Meiji Jingu, but I personally found walking around in the rain a waste of our precious time in Tokyo. We can't read or speak Japanese so ended up wandering round in circles trying to find something that wasn't there in the first place!

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  • kimbee_vergara's Profile Photo

    historic-religious

    by kimbee_vergara Updated Aug 12, 2008

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    the shrine
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    It is a man-made but no t originally designed to attract tourist.
    This perfect example of Shinto architecture--muted colors and spare lines--was opened in 1920 to commemorate the death of Emperor Meiji in 1912. Surrounded by 72 hectares of shady trees and various Japanese flora of the Meiji Jingu Park, it is one of Japan's most sacred and picturesque shrines. The Imperial Treasury House annex exhibits mementos, including the coronation carriage, of Emperor Meiji and Empress Shoken.

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  • imstress's Profile Photo

    Meiju Jingu Shrine

    by imstress Written Aug 12, 2008

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    The Meiju Jingu Shrine is a Shinto shrine established on 1 Nov 1920. It was built for the Emperor Meiji and Empress Shoken. The Emperor died in 1912 and 2 years later the Empress died too. To commemorate their virtures, Japanese from all over the country donated 100,000 tress to creat a forest. You will have to take a long walk on pebbles that leads to this sacred place of worship.

    At the temple entrance, you will need to rinse your hands at the stone basin at the Temizusha, before entering the temple ground. You may put coins in the offering box, bow twice, clap your hands twice, bow again to pay your respect and make your wish.

    www.meijijingu.or.jp/english/index.html

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  • cinthya_in_victoria's Profile Photo

    Our first stop

    by cinthya_in_victoria Updated Dec 6, 2007

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    Our first visit during out tour was to Meiji Temple which was constructed by the Emperor and the Empress of Meiji age. The original temple was destroyed in the Second World War and was re-built. It is very beautiful.

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  • salisbury3933's Profile Photo

    Meiji Shrine

    by salisbury3933 Written Jul 26, 2007

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    The gate at the entrance to Meiji Shrine
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    For a description of the shrine's history, refer to the following link.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meiji_Shrine

    It's a popular tourist destination in Tokyo, and a pleasant place to stroll, as it's a reasonable walk from the entrance to the actual shrine itself, and the path is lined by trees, making it an area of green in the concrete jungle that is central Tokyo.

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  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    Meiji-jingu

    by keeweechic Updated Aug 17, 2006

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    Meiji-jingu is Tokyo's premier Shinto shrine, a memorial to Emperor Meiji, who died in 1912, and his Empress Shoken, who died in 1914. The shrine divides into two parts, the Outer Garden, between Sendagaya and Shinanomachi stations, contains the Meiji Memorial Picture Gallery and several sporting arenas, including the National Stadium and Jingu Baseball Stadium. The more significant important Inner Garden, beside Harajuku Station, includes the emperor's shrine, the empress's iris gardens, the imperial couple's Treasure House and extensive wooded grounds.

    Meiji-jingu is best visited mid-week when its quiet and the tranquility can be enjoyed at leisure.

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  • worldkiwi's Profile Photo

    Enjoy the green space of Yoyogi Park.

    by worldkiwi Written Apr 29, 2006
    Meiji Shrine, Tokyo.

    Yoyogi Park is a pleasantly leafy space in western Tokyo, between Shinjuku and Shibuya. You can easily reach it on the JR Yamanote line from Harajuku Station.
    In Yoyogi Park is the historically significant, though physically newer, Meiji Shrine. The present day structure was built after the original was burnt to the ground, but it has been carefully constructed to match what was originally there. The walk to the shrine is through dense woodland and the massive Tori (gateways) that you pass through are quite a sight. The shrine itself is a peaceful haven amongst the hurly-burly of Tokyo.

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  • nicolaitan's Profile Photo

    Meiji-Jingu Shrine (4 photos)

    by nicolaitan Written Dec 26, 2005

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    These 4 photographs depict the perimeter of the shrine, the main worship hall (haiden), and the exterior and interior of the main shrine. Under Emporer Meiji, Japan developed a constitution and a parliament, underwent an industrial revolution and formed its first alliance with an outside nation (Great Britain), and defeated China in 1895 and Russia in 1905 in the Sino-Japanese and Russo-Japanese wars. His memory is so important to modern day Japan that upwards of 3 million people gather at the shrine each New Year.

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  • nicolaitan's Profile Photo

    Meiji Jingu Shrine - main torii (3 Photos)

    by nicolaitan Updated Dec 24, 2005

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    This shrine opened in 1920 has the subdued architectural style and color scheme classical for Shinto architecture. Destroyed during the war, it was rebuilt in the late 1950"s. It is dedicated to the spirit of Emporer Meiji Who took the Japanese throne in 1868 ending centuries of feudal Tokugawa dynasty isolationism. He began the westernization and modernization of the country prior to his death in 1912. The shrine is surrounded by a large beautiful park of the same name, which includes a garden designed by the emporer. The word "jingu" indicates imperial. At each New Year, millions of Japanese come to renew their wishes for happiness and prosperity in the new year. Twice a week ceremonies are held for newborns. Pictured here is the torii at the entrance to the shrine.

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  • Wild_Orchid's Profile Photo

    Cultural Performances at the Shrine

    by Wild_Orchid Updated May 19, 2005

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    Dancing Colours

    The Meiji Shrine and its surrounding woodlands is a place for everyone to enjoy.

    We visited on a Saturday and I noticed many parents dressed formally bringing their cute as a button young babies (also dressed formally) to be blessed. There was also a coach bringing a newly wed couple and their guests from out of town to snap some photos and to seek blessings at the shrine.

    Various events and festivals are celebrated at the Meiji shrine throughout the year. Check out their website for more details.

    I was lucky to be there when cultural troupes from the various shopping malls in Tokyo were in competition. The shrine courtyard became a swirl of riotous colours as the various troupes danced and sang in unison after months of practice.

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  • Wild_Orchid's Profile Photo

    Feel at Peace at the Meiji Shrine

    by Wild_Orchid Updated May 19, 2005

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    Meiji Shrine
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    Meiji Shrine (Meiji Jingu) is a shrine dedicated to the the Emperor Meiji and Empress Shoken. Emperor Meiji was the revered first emperor of modern Japan. He ascended to the throne in 1868 & passed away in 1912. The Meiji Shrine was completed in 1920, but was destroyed in World War Two & rebuilt.

    Walking through the wooded, shady grounds towards the shrine, my soul felt at peace and my cares faded away. Outside the shrine, I bought some charms to bless my children and our family and to remind me of this special place.

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  • FelixB's Profile Photo

    Tenno Meiji's Last Refuge

    by FelixB Written Apr 9, 2005

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    Meiji Jingu Shrine

    Meiji-jingu Shrine is a relatively new shrine in the middle of Yoyogi Kôen Park and one of the most important attractions in Tokyo. It was after the death of Tenno Meiji who was responsible for the modernisation in Japan and therefore one of the most important emperors in Japanese history. The shrine is dedicated to him and his wife and thousands of people go there on New Year's Eve to wish for a prosperous and successful new year. The Ni-No-Torii gate that marks the entrance to the shrine is the largest gate in Japan. Also worth visiting is the Treasure-House close-by which has got goods that belonged to Emperor Meiji and are from the times after the opening of Japan.

    The Shrine is open from 5 am until 6.40 pm during summer and from 6.40 am until 4 pm during winter. Entry is free of charge.

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  • Rodan44's Profile Photo

    Meiji-Jingu Shrine

    by Rodan44 Written Nov 26, 2004
    Entrance to Meiji-jingu Shrine, Tokyo

    One of the most important Shinto shrines in Japan, Meiji-jingu was constructed in 1920 in honor of Emperor Meiji and Empress Shoken. 30 years later it was destroyed along with most of Tokyo in the incendiary bombing of WWII. It was rebuilt in 1958, preserving the classical style. Particularly impressive are the huge torii gate that tower over the entrances to the park and shrine. The shrine is surrounded by a sprawling park that provides some very pleasant and peaceful walks.

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