Meiji-Jingu Shrine, Tokyo

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Yoyogi Kamizono-cho, Shibuya-ku

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  • Nice place for a walk in the Woods
    Nice place for a walk in the Woods
    by taigaa001
  • No car entries, taking creatures or plants allowed
    No car entries, taking creatures or...
    by taigaa001
  • Ema Tablets for Wishes
    Ema Tablets for Wishes
    by taigaa001
  • Wild_Orchid's Profile Photo

    Cultural Performances at the Shrine

    by Wild_Orchid Updated May 19, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Meiji Shrine and its surrounding woodlands is a place for everyone to enjoy.

    We visited on a Saturday and I noticed many parents dressed formally bringing their cute as a button young babies (also dressed formally) to be blessed. There was also a coach bringing a newly wed couple and their guests from out of town to snap some photos and to seek blessings at the shrine.

    Various events and festivals are celebrated at the Meiji shrine throughout the year. Check out their website for more details.

    I was lucky to be there when cultural troupes from the various shopping malls in Tokyo were in competition. The shrine courtyard became a swirl of riotous colours as the various troupes danced and sang in unison after months of practice.

    Dancing Colours
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  • Wild_Orchid's Profile Photo

    Feel at Peace at the Meiji Shrine

    by Wild_Orchid Updated May 19, 2005

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    Meiji Shrine (Meiji Jingu) is a shrine dedicated to the the Emperor Meiji and Empress Shoken. Emperor Meiji was the revered first emperor of modern Japan. He ascended to the throne in 1868 & passed away in 1912. The Meiji Shrine was completed in 1920, but was destroyed in World War Two & rebuilt.

    Walking through the wooded, shady grounds towards the shrine, my soul felt at peace and my cares faded away. Outside the shrine, I bought some charms to bless my children and our family and to remind me of this special place.

    Meiji Shrine inside the temple grounds outside Meiji Shrine (another entrance)
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    Ema and Omikuji - Wishing for good luck and more

    by FelixB Written Apr 9, 2005

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    At Japanese shrines you will constantly find walls full of little wooden plates and strings full of paper loops. They are called ema and omikuji respectively.
    Ema can be purchased mostly in front of these walls. If you have a wish you write it on the back of it in whatever language and than attach it to the wall.
    The little papers called omikuji are a kind of oracle you make a donation and then draw a paper. Sometimes you have to use a box with sticks in it with a hole on the bottom and the stick that comes out, tells you a number und you have to get a paper from the according draw. These papers tell you whether you have bad, normal, good or excellent luck. In order to strengthen the positive prediciton or for the bad prediction to not come true it is looped around the strings.

    Ema Wish Display at Meiji Shrine
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  • FelixB's Profile Photo

    Tenno Meiji's Last Refuge

    by FelixB Written Apr 9, 2005

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    Meiji-jingu Shrine is a relatively new shrine in the middle of Yoyogi Kôen Park and one of the most important attractions in Tokyo. It was after the death of Tenno Meiji who was responsible for the modernisation in Japan and therefore one of the most important emperors in Japanese history. The shrine is dedicated to him and his wife and thousands of people go there on New Year's Eve to wish for a prosperous and successful new year. The Ni-No-Torii gate that marks the entrance to the shrine is the largest gate in Japan. Also worth visiting is the Treasure-House close-by which has got goods that belonged to Emperor Meiji and are from the times after the opening of Japan.

    The Shrine is open from 5 am until 6.40 pm during summer and from 6.40 am until 4 pm during winter. Entry is free of charge.

    Meiji Jingu Shrine
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  • Rodan44's Profile Photo

    Meiji-Jingu Shrine

    by Rodan44 Written Nov 26, 2004

    One of the most important Shinto shrines in Japan, Meiji-jingu was constructed in 1920 in honor of Emperor Meiji and Empress Shoken. 30 years later it was destroyed along with most of Tokyo in the incendiary bombing of WWII. It was rebuilt in 1958, preserving the classical style. Particularly impressive are the huge torii gate that tower over the entrances to the park and shrine. The shrine is surrounded by a sprawling park that provides some very pleasant and peaceful walks.

    Entrance to Meiji-jingu Shrine, Tokyo
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  • dennisKL's Profile Photo

    Meiji Jingu Garden

    by dennisKL Updated Oct 6, 2004

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    It was originary compound of the Meiji Shrine. June is the best season to view the flower garden. There are lot more building structure around this area include Meiji Memorial Gallery, Baseball stadium, National Stadium(Olympic stadium).
    On the way to the main gate of the shrine, you are actually takes about 5 minutes walk. My advice is to bring some water along as you may need it specially on summer.

    There are lots of sake display on the road side.
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  • dennisKL's Profile Photo

    Meiji Shrine

    by dennisKL Written Oct 6, 2004

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    Shrine that dedicated to the deity of Emperor Meiji. Emperor Meiji was the first emperor of modern Japan. The Meiji Shrine was completed in 1920, and rebuilt after being destroyed in World War Two. It is located in a wooded park area next to Yoyogi Park in Tokyo. Various events and festivals are celebrated at the shrine throughout the year.

    Meiji Shrine
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  • Breen's Profile Photo

    Great Stop I Almost Missed!

    by Breen Written Jun 15, 2004

    I had forgotten till near the end of my trip to make a stop here. While there is little to describe, this is a must see stop in Tokyo. Due to the destruction of much of Tokyo during WWII many of the cultural sites are gone, leaving Meiji as a very special green area in the middle of this giant city to visit. This is a comfortable walk from the enterence through a wooded but defined paths till you get to the shrine itself. It was just special to see it, be sure to check out the gift shop, always something to grab there and they aren't to expensive either.

    This was a veyr quiet day on my visit but a memorable one, something defintely to add to your things to see.

    Shrine
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  • sissah's Profile Photo

    Meiji Shrine

    by sissah Written Feb 16, 2004

    O.k., if you aren't going to get out of Tokyo, check out the Meiji Shrine. It's big, and it's a shrine, and if you're not a big history buff, than it might get tired if you see a lot of them. If you don't see a lot of them, though, check out the Meiji Shrine. This one is pretty important because it's the shrine for the first emperor of modern Japan and his consort. Yoyogi park is right around the corner, too, if you're in a walking mood, but be careful of the evil-black-raven-bloodsucking birds. Someone told me if you'd make eye contact with them, they'd try to eat your face. They were big enough that I didn't test his theory.

    Wall of sake and beer at Meiji Shrine
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  • akikonomu's Profile Photo

    Old Traditions in a Modern World

    by akikonomu Written Dec 27, 2003

    Within the serene grounds of the shrine, you'd almost forget that it's a frenzied world out there at Harajuku.

    You may also get an opportunity to witness a bridal procession or view the chrysanthemum exhibits during autumn. Some of the chrysanthemums are so big and tall they look almost like sunflowers.

    Bridal procession Bridal procession
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  • sunnywong's Profile Photo

    Meiji Jingu Shrine (at Harajuku)

    by sunnywong Written Feb 25, 2003

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    This is Tokyo's most venerable Shinto shrine, opened in 1920 in honor of Emperor and Empress Meiji, who were instrumental in opening Japan to the outside world more than 120 years ago. Japan's two largest torii (the traditional entry gate of a shrine), built of cypress more than 1,700 years old, give dramatic entrance to the grounds. The shaded pathway is lined with trees, shrubs, and dense woods. The shrine is a fine example of dignified and refined Shinto architecture. It's made of plain Japanese cypress and topped with green-copper roofs.

    The shrine is open from sunrise to sunset and admission is free. Inner Garden open 9:00-16:30. Admission

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  • Adeline_Foo's Profile Photo

    MEIJI JINGU SHRINE

    by Adeline_Foo Written Feb 25, 2003

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    This is Tokyo's most venerable Shinto shrine, opened in 1920 in honor of Emperor and Empress Meiji, who were instrumental in opening Japan to the outside world a hundred years ago. Two torii (the traditional entry gate of a shrine), Japan's largest, built of cypress more than 1,700 years old, give dramatic entrance to the grounds, once the estate of a daimyo lord. The shaded pathway is lined with trees, shrubs, and a dense wood. The shrine itself, about a 10-minute walk from the first torii, is a fine example of dignified and refined Shinto architecture. It's made of plain Japanese cypress and topped with green-copper roofs. Meiji Jingu Shrine is the place to be on New Year's Eve, when more than two million people crowd onto the grounds to usher in the New Year

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  • GenkiMac's Profile Photo

    Go to Yoyogi park and meiji...

    by GenkiMac Written Sep 12, 2002

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    Go to Yoyogi park and meiji Shrine (Tokyo's premier Shinto Shrine).
    Inside the grounds of Yoyogi park is Meiji Shrine (meiji-jingu) which is a short walk up a shingled drive from the bridge next to the station. This was built as a symbol of imperial power and Japanese racial superiority in the early 1900's. There is a huge Tori gate and its a peaceful place if you can avoid the crowds as it is set in the woods of the park.
    Of interest also is the cheap market that is held on Sundays next to the park and the young Japanese who dress up in Nurses uniforms, gothic outfits and frilly dresses and just hang around outside the station.
    There are still raves held in the park on some Sundays I think.

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  • chatterley's Profile Photo

    Meiji Shrine - Donation of Sake

    by chatterley Updated Jul 31, 2009

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    On your way to the Shrine, you will see these barrels of sake (Japanese rice wine) on display. These are donated to the shrine, as sake is often consumed as part of Shinto purification rituals.

    Barrels of sake

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  • fachd's Profile Photo

    Ikebana

    by fachd Written Jun 7, 2009

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    See the Ikebana flower arrangement done by Japanese ladies in Kimono at Meiji Jingu Shrine, the flower arrangement are beautiful presented.

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