Map - Atras, Tokyo

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  • Hitch Hiking in Japan?
    Hitch Hiking in Japan?
    by o00o
  • Shinjuku Station
    Shinjuku Station
    by o00o
  • Imperial Palace map
    Imperial Palace map
    by ChuckG
  • witness_wannabe's Profile Photo

    Metro maps

    by witness_wannabe Written May 10, 2006

    You can pick a free metro network map on many bigger metro stations. Either in Japanese (big or very tiny) or in English (a folded pamphlet). The best bet is to take care of it already at Narita airport. Go to the Tourist Info desk and get your free stuff (along with some free maps of Tokyo itself).

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  • o00o's Profile Photo

    Hitch Hiking

    by o00o Written Aug 14, 2004

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Hitch Hiking in Japan?

    Sorry, Japan is an Island country, you can walk to Japan like any other country in Europe or Asia.

    But you can hitch hiking aroung Japan from any part of the country to Tokyo. It depends on you luck.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Backpacking
    • Singles

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  • o00o's Profile Photo

    Shinjuku Station

    by o00o Written Jul 11, 2004

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Shinjuku Station

    One of the biggest JR Station is Shinjuku Station. Almost all local JR line link to Shinjuku.

    My house is one 1 station 2 minutes away from here. Simply give me a call when you reach here or stay nearby.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Luxury Travel
    • Business Travel

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  • PartyRambo's Profile Photo

    Finding a street address

    by PartyRambo Written Mar 23, 2003

    The street addresses in Japan can be very confusing. The city is divided into 23 wards (denoted by '-ku'), each with multiple '-chome' in them (like 'neighbourhood', but not always named with '-chome'). Each '-chome' can have several numbers - Nishi-Shinjuku(1), Nishi-Shinjuku(2), Nishi-Shinjuku(3), etc... and each '-chome' has multiple city blocks in them, simply numbered 1,2,3...
    Buildings on each block are usually numbered 1,2,3..., but there seems no rule as to where the numbers start or end, so you might find the biggest, main building facing a huge intersection as the 'middle' of that block, and have to walk around it.
    This City Atlas (ISBN 4-7700-2314-6) should be a must for residents of Tokyo, certainly English ones, as it clearly states the different areas, -ku's, -chome's, blocks, and marks subway lines, ward boundaries, streets (although not all named, because street addresses don't include the street name!), it notes MANY, MANY sites, offices, stores, parks, etc...

    In the photo, I've circled/underlined ward Nishi-Shinjuku(1), and circled block #9 as samples. You can see the named buildings & sites, the purple areas are the underground subway stations, and the red is Shinjuku Train Station.
    **Note - since VT re-sized photos, I don't think this is as clear a picture as I'd like it to be.

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  • PartyRambo's Profile Photo

    Finding a street address

    by PartyRambo Written Mar 23, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The street addresses in Japan can be very confusing. The city is divided into 23 wards (denoted by '-ku'), each with multiple '-chome' in them (like 'neighbourhood', but not always named with '-chome'). Each '-chome' can have several numbers - Nishi-Shinjuku(1), Nishi-Shinjuku(2), Nishi-Shinjuku(3), etc... and each '-chome' has multiple city blocks in them, simply numbered 1,2,3...
    Buildings on each block are usually numbered 1,2,3..., but there seems no rule as to where the numbers start or end, so you might find the biggest, main building facing a huge intersection as the 'middle' of that block, and have to walk around it.
    This City Atlas (ISBN 4-7700-2314-6) should be a must for residents of Tokyo, certainly English ones, as it clearly states the different areas, -ku's, -chome's, blocks, and marks subway lines, ward boundaries, streets (although not all named, because street addresses don't include the street name!), it notes MANY, MANY sites, offices, stores, parks, etc...

    In the photo, I've circled/underlined ward Nishi-Shinjuku(1), and circled block #9 as samples. You can see the named buildings & sites, the purple areas are the underground subway stations, and the red is Shinjuku Train Station.

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  • PartyRambo's Profile Photo

    Tokyo City Atlas - the premier guide for Westerner

    by PartyRambo Written Mar 23, 2003
    Most important book you can have!

    I strongly (STRONGLY!) advise the traveller (at least, English-speaking travellers) who want to do any walking around for themselves, to invest in a good map.
    If you want to find any addresses on your own, find a bookstore with the 'Tokyo City Atlas : A Bilingual Guide'. It is modern, shows both English and Kanji characters, and includes what I discovered to be VERY important features - it maps out the wards and city blocks!

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  • mike5719's Profile Photo

    Buy a good map!

    by mike5719 Written Dec 1, 2002

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Shinjuku JR Line

    Getting around in Tokyo can be EXTREMELY confusing. A good map covering the JR Line and subways and planning your journey is essential. Getting lost can be expected even for a Tokyoite. Many of the entrances can be difficult to locate and many of the larger underground stations, such as Shinjuku, span over a very large area.
    Stations near tourist spots will usually have signs in English pointing you in the right direction and transit employees in busy stations such as Shinjuku will most likely speak some English, so don't worry.

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  • ChuckG's Profile Photo

    To find your way

    by ChuckG Written Jan 7, 2004
    Imperial Palace map

    There are good maps in all tourist spots. Even if it's not written in english sometimes, it's easy to find your way. Plus locals will be pleased to answer your questions.

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