Rail - Metro - Subway, Tokyo

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    On the subway
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  • kevin407's Profile Photo

    Subway Popping in Tokyo

    by kevin407 Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    There are two nests of subway lines, a maze of train lines, and many feeder lines from the suburbs. Use a good map of the system and figure out your route.

    Approach the entry turn styles and look for the ticket machines (they will be near by). Go to the machine and find one that has an English button. Turn the machine to English and begin to pump money into it. Push the button with the lowest fare and get your ticket. Never worry about having the correct fare because when you exit you will adjust the ticket. You could try to figure out what the correct fare is at the entrance – but you will only screw it up.

    Understand how the turn styles work. Walk up to them, look for the green entrance arrow and feed your ticket into it. It will shoot through the machine and pop out the other end. Walk through the entrance and retrieve your ticket. Walk through like you have lived there all your life – it will make you feel better.

    Board the subway/train and start counting stops. This implies that you know how many stops to your destination. Never try to read the names of the stops as you pass through the stations. They are Japanese names after all – names like Aoymaichi-chome. Even if you can manage to recognize them – the two thousand people packed onto the subway with you will obstruct your view of the platform names.

    Never sit down because with two thousand people jammed into the car with you, getting up is rather difficult.

    You must present your ticket on entering and exiting. So hang onto it. Before you exit however, you will have to adjust the ‘fare’ on the ticket (assuming you followed my advice above). Find a machine that says ‘fare adjustment’ – many of them actually have English above them. Stick your ticket into the machine and it will automatically display how much money is owed on the fare. Drop some coins into the machine and a new ticket will pop out. You may now exit.

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  • salisbury3933's Profile Photo

    Day passes

    by salisbury3933 Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Subway in Tokyo is operated by two Separate companies.

    Tokyo Metro, who operate the Ginza, Marunouchi, Tozai, Yurakucho, Hibiya, Chiyoda, Nanboku, Hanzomon and New Line, and Toei Metro who operate the Oedo, Asakusa, Mita and Shinjuku lines.

    Tokyo Metro's day pass is 710 yen, and Toei Metro's day pass is 500 yen. Alternatively you can buy a 1000 yen pass which covers both systems.

    Toei Shinjuku line train

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  • RawdgerDodger's Profile Photo

    Tokyo Metro

    by RawdgerDodger Updated Apr 4, 2011

    The Tokyo metro is much like the Paris metro. I actually heard a rumor that the Tokyo metro was designed after the Parisian metro. Anyhow, it is very easy to use and there is English right underneath the Japanese Hirigana, Kategana, and Kanji for each stop. Just buy a metro card from the ticket booth and begin your travels. Get yourself a map, just ask for one at the counter, and that should provide you with a good view of what the metro can provide. Examples of hot places to go include Rappongi and Shibuya. But there are many more.

    Tokyo Metro
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  • wakaremasta's Profile Photo

    Train System

    by wakaremasta Updated Apr 4, 2011

    Getting around Metro Tokyo is best by train..it is faster and very affordable..you can use coins or train card for payment..if you used to travel a lot you can top-up your card. During pick hours train is full-pack of passenger..it is normal so don't wait just get in. The train will always come on time. If you visit here first time, try to pick a train route map in the train station, it will shows train route with corresponding train name and time.
    Most Japanese hardly speak English so be ready to learn some basics of their language.
    From Narita Airport, the best train to Metro Tokyo is the Narita Express, from Narita it will travel to Shinjuko which is in the vicinity of Tokyo.
    If you are in Tokyo and have a scheduled flight at Narita Airport, when you take Narita Express, your ticket will be inspected as if you are already check-in in the Airport. So don't worry that you will miss your flight. Narita Express Train has scheduled that you can match to your scheduled flight.

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  • witness_wannabe's Profile Photo

    Getting around by Tokyo Metro

    by witness_wannabe Updated Apr 4, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Metro in Tokyo is fast, reliable and, probably, always on schedule (see my picture). There are two separate metro companies in Tokyo: Tokyo Metro and Toei. You can use both or either one of them to get pretty much everywhere in the city (Toei network is somewhat thinner....). Since I was moving around the city quite a lot, I've opted for daily tickets and used only Tokyo Metro company. The price was 710 yen. Considering that one ride only cost anywhere from 160 to 230 yen, the daily ticket starts paying off after some four rides only. If you travel a lot, this is definitely your choice!
    The most challenging is, by far, using the right metro exit, to get you to the place you're heading to. Metro stations are big (or virtually hudge....) and have many exits. What you shoud know is that there are maps of the vicinity as well as the maps of metro exit network on EVERY station. Just look for them (on the walls), find them, study them and figure out which exit you shoud use to reach your spot.
    I did not use Toei metro or JR trains at all.

    Always on time.....

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  • salisbury3933's Profile Photo

    Getting around Tokyo

    by salisbury3933 Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Tokyo's subway system is not the most beautiful in the world by any means, but it is one of the most extensive, and is pretty cheap as well, with journeys beginning from 160 yen (less than half of what you'd pay in London for example).

    It's a great way to get about the city once you learn to navigate your way around.

    There are 13 lines, run by two separate companies.

    You can either buy day passes for one or both companies, or buy a passnet pay as you go card which you put into the wicket as you go, meaning you don't need to buy a ticket for each individual journey.

    Train on Toei Oedo line Takadanobaba Underground Station

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  • gabphomania's Profile Photo

    Train Ticket System

    by gabphomania Updated Apr 4, 2011

    When you first arrive at Tokyo at Narita Airport and catching your first train could be very daunting. We spent around 20 mins observing locals buying a ticket at the ticket machine. After observing for a while since everything is in Japanese and not in english (which is fair enough we are in Japan : )) on the top right hand corner there is a little square small box. I cant remember if it says english in english or english in japanese but thats the button u press to get the english menu up.

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  • Map Guide for Tokyo

    by curiousdave Updated Apr 4, 2011

    I bought several book and subway guides for Tokyo, but this one proved to be the best:
    http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/4770025033/wwwtimeanddacom/104-7712448-0061537

    It has VERY good maps and diagrams of the subway stations so that you can look for which exit to take. Plus it has maps of all the surface streets, too. THE BEST PART is that all the names are also printed in Japanese, so asking for help is very easy.

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  • Jim_Eliason's Profile Photo

    Subway

    by Jim_Eliason Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Tokyo has such a great subway service that any other form of transportation is mute. Cabs are way too expensive to consider and traffic will make them a very slow way of getting around anyway. However, you need to be careful because the Tokyo Metro System is run by private companies and the ticket you buy for one line may not be good for another.

    Tokyo Metro map
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  • DanCerdena's Profile Photo

    TOKYO METRO TRAINS

    by DanCerdena Updated Apr 4, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    One can travel around Tokyo cheaply using the Tokyo Metro trains costing only 710 yen. Using the ticket vending machine, buy a One Day pass that will take you to many tourist sites using the liens of Tokyo Metro.

    TOKYO METRO
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  • kevarms's Profile Photo

    Don't be afraid .....

    by kevarms Updated Apr 4, 2011

    I was expecting some real horrific subway rides in Tokyo packed in a like a sardine with my nose pressed against somebody's armpit. But outside of the rush hour and at weekends the Tokyo subway is not too bad at all. Although I rarely got a seat there was always plenty of standing room. It's a cinch !

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  • K1W1's Profile Photo

    Spagetti looks more straightforward than this map

    by K1W1 Updated Apr 4, 2011

    After using Beijings' 3 line metro map, the Tokyo metro map with its myriad of twisting lines, makes spagetti look organised. There are two metro companies but you would only know this by the fact that you have to pay separately for each company.
    It is worthwhile buying a prepaid card which will save you the hassle of having to look up the price of you destination each time you go to use the metro. The prepaid card comes in several denominations.

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  • Bela_LUng's Profile Photo

    Relax, it's just a metro! WOOO!

    by Bela_LUng Updated Apr 4, 2011

    The metro, while at first scary looking, is awesome. You can get anywhere you want within the city. The metro consists of 2 seperate companies (TRTA and TOEI) and a total of 13 lines.

    You can buy a pass for each of the different companies, but I find it better to get the pass that allows for unlimited travel on both. It cost me 1000 yen and I used the hell out of it

    The subway operates from about 5:30am till 2am or something like that. I could never reallly tell.

    Anyways. it's greay, you'll love it.

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  • TravelBug_sg's Profile Photo

    New subway map of Tokyo

    by TravelBug_sg Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Here is the link to the latest map
    http://www.tokyometro.jp/network/pdf/rosen_eng.pdf

    A good tip from a local is : if you have limited time, just take the Ginza line, and make stops along the way. You should be able to see some popular spots - e.g. Ginza itself, Shibuya (G1), Omote Sando (G2), Asakusa (G19). The Marunouchi Line has some nice spots too like Shinjuku/ Harajuku (M8), Tokyo (M17), & Ginza too (M16).

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  • loisl's Profile Photo

    No car needed

    by loisl Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Tokyo has a perfect system of subway and local trains - and it's easy to use, even for foreigners.
    During rushhours it's a bit crowded at the major stations.
    Just imagine, at Shinjuku station about 12 Mio. passengers are changing/entering daily.

    Don't even think about using a rental car, you won't find your way, and there are no parking lots.

    rushhour Shinjuku

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