Getting Around Kazakhstan

  • Astana Airport Terminal -  Kazakhstan
    Astana Airport Terminal - Kazakhstan
    by WorldPassenger
  • The blue dome of Astana International Airport
    The blue dome of Astana International...
    by WorldPassenger
  • Air Astana airplane
    Air Astana airplane
    by WorldPassenger

Most Viewed Transportation in Kazakhstan

  • traveldave's Profile Photo

    Almaty International Airport

    by traveldave Updated Oct 9, 2013

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Located in the center of Asia, Almaty International Airport (ALA) is the main hub for travel to the newly independent republics of Central Asia. It is also served by a few airlines from Western Europe and the Far East.

    The problem with traveling to and from Kazakhstan, especially from Europe, is that most flights arrive around midnight or later, and depart at about 3:00 a.m.

    Airlines serving Almaty International Airport: Air Arabia, Air Astana, airBaltic, Asiana Airways, Avia Traffic Company, bmi British Midland, China Southern Airlines, CSA Czech Airlines, Donbassaero, Egyptair, Etihad Airways, Euroline, Georgian Airways, Imair, Kam Air, KLM Royal Dutch Airlines, Lufthansa German Airlines, Rossiya, RusLine, SCAT Air, Semeyavia, S7 Airlines, Tajik Air, Transaero Airlines, Turkish Airlines, Turkmenistan Airlines, Ukraine International Airlines, Ural Airlines, and Uzbekistan Airways.

    Was this review helpful?

  • traveldave's Profile Photo

    Four-Wheel-Drive Buses

    by traveldave Updated Oct 8, 2012

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Many of the main roads in Kazakhstan are not well maintained. However, it is still possible to travel safely throughout most of the country by automobile.

    In the mountains, on the other hand, most of the roads are dirt tracks that are frequently wiped out from rock or snow slides, or washed out from heavy rains or melting snow. The only way to get around on such roads is by Soviet-era four-wheel-drive buses. Most of the buses used in Kazakhstan are the PAZ-672 model manufactured by the Pavlovo Bus Factory, located in the city of Pavlovo in the Nizhny Novgorod Oblast of Russia. Production on that model started in early 1968 as a replacement to the earlier PAZ-652 model. The PAZ-672 is used mainly for rural and regional service, and is outfitted with four-wheel-drive when it is to be used in areas with rough roads.

    The shock absorbers on these buses leave much to be desired, so the ride is very bumpy and uncomfortable. In addition, the four-wheel-drive buses travel very slowly because of the condition of the roads and the fact that they are not designed for speed. However, they will usually get travelers to their destination.

    Was this review helpful?

  • paulvir's Profile Photo

    Flying to Almaty from west Coast of US

    by paulvir Written Jul 8, 2010

    To get to Almaty, Kazakhstan from the west coast of US, I flew LAX-Incheon-Almaty on Asiana.

    My itinerary included 11 hr long layover in Incheon. Because my flights were on 1 itinerary, my checkin bags were sent directly to Almaty. I didn't have to worry about the bags except for my backpack while touring in South Korea for a few hours. I'd have checked in my bags all the way to Almaty even if I wasn't going on a tour as it saves me the trouble of getting bags and go through security check again. Obviously you will need to pack extra stuff (change of clothes, small umbrella etc) you will need in your carryon until you get to Almaty.

    On my return flight to LAX, the Asiana crew informed passengers that all bags had to be checked out and go through immigration at LAX, regardless of the next connecting flight. I was glad I didn't have to go through that.

    There's plenty of things to see and food to eat in Incheon airport alone. But if you feel you have to see more of Korea than just the airport, check out www.freedomtour.co.kr/

    Related to:
    • Business Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • paulvir's Profile Photo

    Taxis in Almaty

    by paulvir Written Jul 8, 2010

    In Almaty, don't look for any taxi with the taxi sign on top.

    Anyone can work as a taxi driver if he owns his own car. Some work as a taxi driver full time while others do it part time. These part time drivers basically pick up passengers while they are out do run errands. If a passenger is going the way same, that the driver may take him, for a fee.

    To call a taxi, you stand on the side of the road and raise your arm at about 45 degree angle. A car would stop and you can negotiate the price depending on the the destination (distance) and # of passengers. Obviously you would need to know the local geography and language to use this service but it was quite interesting to see and experience with our local guides. Many times the cars wouldn't take us due to the destination or the fee we were willing to pay.

    Don't expect new/expensive cars to stop. Owners of these people obviously don't need to make $ as taxi drivers.

    Also, quite a few cars in Almaty have the driver seat on the Right side of the car. Supposedly these cars were imported from HongKong, UK and Japan.

    Related to:
    • Business Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Over60's Profile Photo

    SCAT Airlines

    by Over60 Updated Dec 12, 2008

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is Kazakhstan's "other" airline--surely a throwback to the Aeroflot era. It's listed in Lonely Planet, and there is a web site, but the site is in Russian only. Using a list of cities written in Cyrillic, it's possible to puzzle out the schedule, but its not possible to make a reservation on line. The temptation might be to just turn to Air Astana, with its modern English web site and on-line reservation system, but there was real money to be saved here, so I persisted. With the helpful assistance of David Berghof of Stantours in Almaty, I was able to pu rchase tickets for my two flights, from Shymkent to Aktau and from Aktau to Astana; however, neither reservations nor ticket purchases were available until about a month before the actual flights.

    Shymkent and Aktau are small airports, and it took the Shymkent staff some time to find the one employee who spoke some English.; however, everyone was extremely helpful. The agent told me that a Yak-42 had been substituted for the originally scheduled prop-driven AN-24 and that the departure would be four hours later but that the faster plane would make up for it. This wasn't , strictly speaking, true, but we did arrive only a couple of hours late, and I was on vacation, so what the heck? The plane bore a striking resemblance to the old Boeing-727 and showed its age, but I saw nothing that provoked anxiety. The seat pitch was undoubtedly the shallowest I have encountered in my many travels, but the dinner was good and the portions extremely generous. The flight attendant also spoke at least a bit of English. The second flight a few days later went off without a hitch on the same aircraft. This is not travel for those who want a conventional or luxury experience, but it was interesting and I managed to save several hundred dollars with only minor inconvenience and experience air travel as the locals experience it. It's also a lot better than a two-day train trip across the endless steppe and desert (Kazaklhstan is a very big place!) Unless you speak Russian, you're going to need the help of David or someone like him, but his fee was modest and his service good.

    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • WorldPassenger's Profile Photo

    Kazakhstan's National Airline - Air Astana

    by WorldPassenger Updated Jul 19, 2008

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    In order to reach Astana I had to take an Air Astana flight from Moscow (SVO) at 9:50am and then fly to Almaty arriving at 4:15PM local time. That was a 4 hour and 25 minute trip. There were a few time zones changes as you can see!

    Then there was about 1 hour layover in Almaty before boarding for another Air Astana flight on to Astana for another 1 hour and 45 minutes. So leaving Moscow at 9:50am got me to Astana at 7:55pm after flying for a bit over 6 hours.

    The planes were both comfortable and the airline magazine (Tengri) was actually pretty interesting to read. It was printed in both Russian and English. It has some very nice articles about Kazakhstan as well as other places in Asia. The service on the flights was excellent and the flight attendants spoke English. The flight captain gave his announcements in both Russian and in English.

    In May 2002 Air Astana, the national airline of Kazakhstan, began operations and is the largest airline in Kazakhstan. They operates a few 737’s and 757’s for international flights from Astana and some turbo prop planes for inter-Kazakhstan flights.

    As of March 2008, Air Astana had flights to several cities in Europe and also flights to the near the far East. Direct flights from Europe to Astana can be found from Hannover and Frankfurt Germany and also from Moscow.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Business Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • 2 more images

    Kazachstan by train

    by Tobias_Plieninger Written Jul 16, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Kazachstan has a big railway system.

    There are frequent trains connecting the major cities.

    The train has three chlasses.

    Busines: Two beds
    Kupe: Four beds togehther
    Platskart: Open wagon with many people

    The conductor has tea and mineral water but you should bring your cup with

    Buying tickets: It is not easy to buy tickets. Some ticket sellers are unfriendly to foreigners.
    Pretend to buy tickets and don't go away from the counter.

    Important: Write in kyrillic letters: Train number, departure time, and destination.
    Bring your passport with.

    There is one weekly train to Moscow.
    But is the same price by plane. So you should only take the train if you want the adventure.

    Related to:
    • Trains
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Ibiza_Nino's Profile Photo

    More travelling from Kazakhstan

    by Ibiza_Nino Written Sep 13, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Rail
    There are rail connections with the Russian Federation
    (travel time to Moscow is now three days) and with other
    Central Asian Republics. However, tourists are advised that
    robberies on trains have been reported. Although we never got ripped off.

    AIR and BUS
    in Kazakhstan. The connection from there to Kyrgyzstan is via frequent bus services to Bishkek (travel time – four hours). Other European airlines flying direct to Almaty include KLM (from Amsterdam) and Lufthansa (five weekly flights from Frankfurt/M). There are also direct flights to Bishkek from Moscow and St Petersburg (Russian Federation) and from Tashkent (Uzbekistan). I flew to St.Petersburg from Isikul Lake via Bishkek and paid about 15 pounds for the 7 hour flight .THAT WAS THEN...we couldn't even use hard currency as was required by Aeroflot at the time for all foreigners, we basically were off the radar screen.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Ibiza_Nino's Profile Photo
    2 more images

    traveling by road from Kazakhstan

    by Ibiza_Nino Written Sep 13, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Driving through the heart of the Zailiysky Steppes,
    with their wide greens filled with beautiful poppy fields
    in the Summertime we headed off to another stan

    Road
    we went in 1991 when there were no tourists going to
    Biskek in Kyrgyzstan and we had to hitch a ride by car.
    There are buses going now and it's probably safer that
    way. We got a lift with a Georgian who had a horse farm
    and sold them for meat to France and other European countries.
    He wanted to impress us so it was more like a high speed
    car chase through the mountain road. At that time it was still
    the CCCP so there were no borders.
    The main international road links are with Kazakhstan and there
    is presently one crossing point into China (PR); visitors should
    note that the Chinese authorities normally require proof of an
    invitation by a Chinese tour operator as a condition of entry.
    There are regular bus links from Bishkek to Tashkent (Uzbekistan)
    (travel time – 10 to 12 hours) and Almaty (Kazakhstan) (travel time – six hours);
    services leave the long-distance (zapadni) bus station in Bishkek.
    There is also a direct service to Osh from Tashkent (Uzbekistan)
    via the Fergana Valley, but road conditions are very poor on this
    route (see also Uzbekistan section). Generally, roads can be
    affected by landslides (especially during spring in the mountain areas),
    while winter may cause hazardous conditions on a number of roads
    (especially on mountain passes, some of which may be closed during
    certain periods); visitors should also note that garage services are very limited.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Pennyrama's Profile Photo

    The Center. Central Kazakhstan...

    by Pennyrama Written Sep 8, 2002

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Center. Central Kazakhstan has one of the largest lakes in the world. The unique Lake Balkhash is one-half salt, one-half fresh water. Some archaeological and ethnographical sites have been preserved in Central Kazakhstan. There are Bronze Age and Early Iron Age sites and New Stone Age and Bronze Age settlements in the Karkarala Oasis. The Bayan-Aul National Park has rock drawings, stone sculptures, clean, sparkling lakes and pines clinging to the rocks. The Baikonur Cosmodrome is located 5 km (3 miles) from the garrison city of Leninsk and 230 km (143 miles) from Kzylorda city. Astana, a new capital of Kazakhstan is located in the region.

    The East. East Kazakhstan offers picturesque landscape of snow-capped mountain peaks, plunging forested canyons and beautiful cedar forests. Lake Markakol is 35 km (22 miles) long and 19 km (12 miles) wide and lies 1,449 m (4 754 ft) above sea level. The city of Semipalatinsk, 30 km (19 miles) from Siberia, was a place of exile of famous Russian people, whose houses are preserved as museums. Other museums in the city include the Abai Kunanbayev Museum, commemorating a great Kazakh poet and philosopher, and the History Museum. Nuclear tests were carried out south-west of Semipalatinsk until 1990, and today background radiation does not exceed international standards. The town of Ust-Kamenogorsk is a mining and smelting town and is the gateway to the Altai Mountains. Occupying the central point of the continent, these gentle mountains are covered with meadows and woods and stretch for thousands of kilometers into Mongolia.

    Was this review helpful?

  • AndreasK's Profile Photo

    Transportation: Tickets for...

    by AndreasK Written Sep 7, 2002

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Transportation: Tickets for the Moscow-Almaty flight are sold out long in advance. The introduction of additional flights along that route are being delayed by the sluggish repairs of airport facilities.
    Permission for our flight from Moscow to Baikonur was very difficult to obtain and required approval by government officials both in Moscow and at the cosmosdrome. In the light of increasing restrictions on visas, I recommend that you book an organized tour for visiting the cosmodrome.

    Was this review helpful?

  • rythm_divine's Profile Photo

    It is possible to get here...

    by rythm_divine Written Aug 26, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    It is possible to get here mostly by airplane.
    As you already noticed the territory is huge & you'll have to use airplane even to get to another city. It's ridiculous that the ticket from Almata to Astana costs about 300$, almost the same price is from Almata to Bankok for instance.The local airlines just try to make money on it,though offering not very quality service.
    Of course it is also possible by car but you'll be tired to death traveling for days & it's not safety.
    If you want to safe money you can also try the railway,though it's not much comfortable .
    Buses are also not bad but it depends on a distance.
    If you want to rent a car in a city you'll have to be a very professional driver because drivers here are not very polite & sometimes don't keep the rules.
    Renting motorcycles are for people with suicidal intentions:)

    Was this review helpful?

  • ianrmillard's Profile Photo

    Trolleybuses are best in...

    by ianrmillard Written Aug 25, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Trolleybuses are best in Almaty [see pic]. Watch out for pickpockets. They are not pervasive in their presence but DO exist. Around the country, car or bus is better than train. Probably best for long distance is domestic air, which is quite reasonably priced: don't forget Kazakhstan takes several hours to overfly; Moscow takes as much as six hours (by train, 77 hours...)

    Was this review helpful?

  • travelmad478's Profile Photo

    I flew to Almaty from Moscow...

    by travelmad478 Written Aug 25, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I flew to Almaty from Moscow on Kazakh Airways (which I believe is now defunct). Several Western airlines now fly to Almaty direct from Europe--probably a better, if more expensive, choice. KazAir was just fine as 'BabyFlots' go--my favorite part of the trip was when they served tea by bringing around a standard issue, orange-painted teakettle. Our meal on the five-hour flight from Moscow was a cold hot dog and a handful of cold peas, with a packet of pomegranate juice imported from Iran. In the former Soviet Union of 1994, this was not bad.
    Within Kazakhstan I did a lot of driving around, flew internally almost every week between Almaty/Zhambyl/Chimkent, and took the train from Kzyl-Orda to Chimkent. The train was by far the most fun. Although traveling companion and I were warned extensively about the dangers of taking the train, we had to take it anyway because there was no other way out of the suicidally depressing town of Kzyl-Orda. The trip took 11 hours and that was one of the best days I spent in Kazakhstan--we saw camels en route, ate ourselves silly as we bought yummy food from women selling it alongside the train at stations, and had a great time talking to the other people in our compartment. The train in the former Soviet Union is the best way to travel, in my opinion.

    Was this review helpful?

  • rythm_divine's Profile Photo

    There are special tourist...

    by rythm_divine Written Aug 26, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    There are special tourist services which offer a horse riding in the mountaines. Even if you are scared of horses, don't worry, they will give you the most friendly one:)

    Was this review helpful?

Kazakhstan Hotels

Top Kazakhstan Hotels

Almaty Hotels
345 Reviews - 780 Photos
Astana Hotels
38 Reviews - 67 Photos
Atyrau Hotels
28 Reviews - 20 Photos
Karaganda Hotels
8 Reviews - 10 Photos
Kazakhstan Hotels
1 Hotel
Aktobe Hotels
1 Hotel
Aktau Hotels
1 Hotel
Aktau Hotels
4 Reviews - 14 Photos
Aktobe Hotels
1 Hotel

Instant Answers: Kazakhstan

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

99 travelers online now

Comments

Kazakhstan Transportation

Reviews and photos of Kazakhstan transportation posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Kazakhstan sightseeing.
Map of Kazakhstan