Kara-Kol Local Customs

  • Revolution
    Revolution
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  • Local Customs
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    What does the future hold
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Most Recent Local Customs in Kara-Kol

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    Myths of the Dragon-Children Salyk

    by budapest8 Written Sep 12, 2007

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    Flying over in a helicopter
    over Issyk - Ata Pass 3964 m.
    to the next Pass.Over Alamedin
    Then Tor River to see the glaciers.
    The pass is 4023 m. high.
    We can see grazing mountain goats,
    and if we are lucky -the famous near
    extinct Snow Leopard.
    Arriving in the Salyk Valley walking down to the
    hot springs from the chalet visiting a
    natural mineral hot spring's pool
    in a building just below the chalet.
    Are we really in the land of dragons?? I wonder----


    As blood passes through a mortal's heart,
    so does time beat through the heart of the dragon.

    This was not so, in ages passed, when the
    universe was but ice and chaos, cold and black,
    with nothing to stir its depths or give meaning to
    its movements. In time a being willed itself into
    creation, and it was Salyk-sho, the first dragon,
    and the Creator. She looked upon the universe
    with round, wise eyes, and was displeased; as
    her first course of action, she travelled the dark
    expanses, and devoured the energies and debris
    that cluttered space, and for her it was a day's work,
    as a dragon's heart pumps languidly.
    Written by Steve Gold

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    Revolution in Kyrgyzstan 2005

    by budapest8 Updated Sep 12, 2007

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    Kyrgyzstan flag



    What is dangerous in Kyrgyzstan are tactics
    that are bringing thousands
    of citizens onto the streets to protest clumsy
    attempts to stop opposition
    candidates. While the Akaev government had
    all but squandered its potential
    to be remembered as a progressive force for
    democracy and human rights,
    it might itself have dragged the society into chaos.
    Free and fair elections do not result
    in instability and insecurity.
    At this point, what poses the real security danger
    to this beautiful Central Asian state is a numb paternalism
    that blindly assumes
    that a population hungry for democracy and
    human rights will remain passive.

    A spot of diatribe goes down well with a glass of vodka and a plate of Ploff.

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    Ploff Ploff Ploff

    by budapest8 Updated Sep 12, 2007

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    map of the region...Ploff-land
    1 more image


    No its not Thomas the Tank Engine but a
    wonderful dish originating from Central Asia.
    It is a rich, spicey dish, similar to Spanish rice.
    Maybe even cous cous in the way it is eaten.
    Usually bits of chicken or lamb are added for flavour,
    in our case it was lamb, lamb and lamb
    plus sometimes a dab of the ubiquitous Russian mayonnaise.

    “Hosts and guests play the fun game of forcing more portions upon
    you, politely refusing at first, more pushing,more eating and usually
    washed down with Russian Vodka or some Brandy, then the seams
    of your stomach begin to stretch, breathing gets harder, so the alchohol
    helps to relax the muscle, then okay just a little, followed by not politely refusing ”

    By this stage, you will never want to see another sheep, or even contemplate
    about eating for the next 24 hrs. In fact you feel so bloated you have to undo
    the top button of your trousers or kilt if you wear one,
    At one home they Ploff as a side dish....I looked with horror when the
    main course was brought in....Bish Mar Mar...sliced sheep eaten
    with 5 fingers and scooped up together with something looking
    like a pasta. If your really like us, we got the sheeps head on a
    plate..you offer a slice of eyeball to your guests...
    Please don't tell this to Shaun the Sheep!

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    Revolution in Kyrgyzstan 2005

    by budapest8 Updated Sep 12, 2007

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    Ex Prez in trad Kyrgyz hat


    TO BE UPDATED SOON WITH MORE DIATRIBE...


    WATCH THIS SPACE
    ________________
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    oO)-.
    /__ _\
    \ \ ( |
    \__| \ {
    _'_ _ '--_' -----Ribbit

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    Change of power

    by budapest8 Written May 10, 2006

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    What does the future hold


    Recent History

    Akaev subsequently went on to spoil the good reputation he'd built himself.
    He fiddled with the consitution, staged elections and referenda condemned
    as unfair by international observers, intimidated political opponents,
    consolidated power in the role of president, won himself lifelong immunity from
    prosecution and - perhaps most importantly - lost his reforming zeal. By the turn
    of the millennium, the country had slipped from early pacesetter of
    transformation to stagnant backwater.

    Akaev has proven to be an agile diplomat, however, settling border disputes
    with neighbours China and Kazakhstan (critics say he gave too much away)
    and overseeing rapprochement with China. He has at the same time rented
    out Kyrgyz territroy to the US and Russia for the establishment of military bases.
    It seemed that, by 2004, with immunity from prosecution assured, Akaev was
    preparing for life after politics - just as well, as in in March 2005 opposition protests
    and political pressure forced him to flee the country, forcing fresh presidential
    elections in July 2005 and a year of political uncertainty.

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    More recent history and revolution

    by budapest8 Updated May 10, 2006

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    Revolution
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    Akaev has gone on to establish himself as a stubborn reformer,
    restructuring the executive apparatus to suit his liberal political and
    economic attitudes, and instituting reforms considered to be the
    most radical in the Central Asian republics. Akaev and his economic
    program got a solid popular vote of confidence in a referendum in 1994
    and again in early 1995 elections. The following year, Kyrgyzstan signed
    a non-aggression agreement with Russia, China, Kazakhstan and Tajikistan.


    REVOLUTION

    ARTICLE BY Aaron Rhodes who is the executive director
    of the International Helsinki Federation for Human Rights.

    Posted February 25, 2005

    As we write these words, thousands of Kyrgyz are protesting on the streets
    about the removal of opposition candidates from the race for parliamentary seats
    . According to the Kyrgyz Committee for Human Rights and to the Kyrgyz
    branch of the Bureau on Human Rights and the Rule of Law, there are protests
    in Naryn, Talas, Jalalabad, the capital Bishkek, and other towns.

    International human rights groups have dutifully recorded and expressed
    concern about illegal attempts to thwart opposition campaigns and to
    manipulate the results of the elections, which will be held on 27 February
    . Kyrgyz human rights activists say that President Askar Akaev, having already
    "taken over" the government apparatus, is now trying to take over the legislative
    branch, after which he can join several other leaders of former Soviet republics
    in establishing a dynasty for himself and his family. The ground is clearly being
    prepared: numerous family relatives of the president are running in these
    elections.

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    Modern History

    by budapest8 Written May 10, 2006

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    Mountain kingdom


    The new colonial masters dished land over to Russian settlers,
    and the Kyrgyz put up with it until a revolt in 1916, which was heavily
    put down by the Russian army. Kyrgyz lands became part of the
    Turkestan Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic (ASSR) within the
    Russian Federation in 1918, then a separate Kara-Kyrgyz Autonomous Oblast
    in 1924 and a full SSR in 1936. Many nomads were settled in the course
    of land reforms in the 1920s, and more were forcibly settled during
    a cruel collectivisation campaign in the 1930s.

    Despite conservative Kyrgyz leadership in the days of Mikhail Gorbachev's
    perestroika, several groups were founded to fight the issues of unemployment
    and homelessness - some activists going so far as to seize vacant land and
    build houses on it. Land and housing were in fact at the root of Central Asia's
    most infamous 'ethnic' violence, between Kyrgyz and Uzbeks
    around Osh in 1990. Elections were held in traditional Soviet rubber-stamp
    style to the Kyrgyz Supreme Soviet in February 1990,
    with the Kyrgyz Communist Party (KCP) walking away with nearly all the seats.
    After multiple ballots, Askar Akaev, a physicist, was installed as a compromise
    president. In August 1991, the Kyrgyz Supreme Soviet reluctantly voted to declare
    Kyrgyzstan's independence. Six weeks later, Akaev was re-elected president,
    running unopposed. By the end of the year, Kyrgyzstan joined the
    Commonwealth of Independent States. In May 1993 a brand-new constitution
    dispensed with the last structural vestiges of the Soviet era.

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    Pre 20th Century History before communism

    by budapest8 Written May 10, 2006

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    Goldern Warrior


    The earliest notable residents of what is now Kyrgyzstan
    were warrior tribes of Saka (also known as Scythians),
    from about the 6th century BC to the 5th century AD.
    Alexander the Great met perhaps the stiffest resistance from Saka tribes
    in his 4th century BC advance through Central Asia.
    Rich bronze and gold relics have been recovered from
    Scythian burial mounds at Lake Issyk-Kul and in southern Kazakstan.

    The region was under the control of various Turkic alliances
    from the 6th to 10th centuries, with a sizeable population living
    on the shores of Lake Issyk-Kul. Kyrgyzstan was the scene of a
    pivotal battle in 751, when the Turks and their Arab and Tibetan
    allies drove a large Tang Chinese army out of Central Asia.
    Ancestors of today's Kyrgyz people probably lived in Siberia's upper
    Yenisey basin until at least the 10th century, when under the influence
    of Mongol incursions they began migrating south into the Tian Shan -
    more urgently with the rise of Genghis Khan in the 13th century.
    Present-day Kyrgyzstan was part of the inheritance of
    Genghis's second son, Chagatai.

    Peace was shattered in 1685 by the arrival of the ruthless
    Mongol Oyrats of the Zhungarian Empire, who drove vast
    numbers of Kyrgyz south into present-day Tajikistan.
    When the Oyrats were defeated by the Manchu (Qing),
    the Kyrgyz became de facto subjects of the Chinese, who
    mainly left them to their nomadic ways. In the 18th century
    the feudal tentacles of the Kokand khanate began to encircle
    them, though the feisty Kyrgyz constantly made trouble from their
    Tian Shan redoubts. As the Russians moved closer in the 19th century,
    various Kyrgyz tribal leaders made their own peace with Russia or Kokand.
    Russian forces slowly rolled over the towns of Kokand, their advance
    culminating in the defeat of Tashkent in 1865.
    The Kyrgyz were gradually eased into the tsar's provinces of
    Ferghana and Semireche.

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