Luang Prabang Things to Do

  • Suburban Luang Prabang
    Suburban Luang Prabang
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  • The red chapel and rear of the Sim.
    The red chapel and rear of the Sim.
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Most Recent Things to Do in Luang Prabang

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    The Royal Palace.

    by IreneMcKay Written Feb 23, 2013

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    Wat on the palace grounds.
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    Luang Prabang's royal palace is now its national museum. Entry 20,000 kip. We did not go inside just looked at its grounds where you can see a stunningly beautiful wat, the royal theatre, a statue, a fish pond, some lovely plants.

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    Wats on Sakkarine Road.

    by IreneMcKay Written Feb 23, 2013

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    Wat Sop.
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    There were lots of beautiful wats one after another on this road. All were free entry and all are worth a visit. Sakkarine Road is a continuation of the main road as it heads towards the end of the peninsula.

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    Wat That Noi and Wat Hor Xieng.

    by IreneMcKay Written Feb 23, 2013

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    Wat That Noi.
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    These wats are right next to each other which is why I include them together. They are located near the post office on the other side of the road. Entry to these wats is free. Entry to Wat Hor Xieng is protected by a fierce looking snake and to Wat That Noi by a many headed nga. The wall paintings on Wat Hor Xieng depicted many gruesome, hellish punishment scenes. I saw exactly the same scenes depicted on other wats, too. Peaceful gardens.

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    Wat Mai

    by IreneMcKay Written Feb 23, 2013

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    Golden facade, Wat Mai.
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    This wat is located on Sisavongvang Road quite close to the royal palace (now the national museum). This wat dates from the early 19th century. Entry is 10,000 kip. The best thing about the wat is the gold panels depicting the life of Buddha on its facade. It also had beautiful ceilings and a pretty garden with statues and (right up the back) the temple boat.

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    Wat Xiengthong.

    by IreneMcKay Written Feb 23, 2013

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    Wall scene Wat Xiengthong.
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    This wat means wat of the golden city. It is located near the end of the peninsula where the Mekong and Nam Khan Rivers meet. Entry cost 20,000 kip. We entered on the Mekong side where the wat was protected by some fierce looking cat statues. For me the best thing about this wat was its beautiful wall decorations including the tree of life on the back wall of its main building ( I won't include a photo as it was being repaired and had scaffolding over it during our visit) and lots of other beautifully depicted everyday scenes. The wat dates from around 1560.

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    Mount Phousi.

    by IreneMcKay Written Feb 23, 2013

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    View over the Nam Khan River from Mount Phousi.
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    We climbed up Mount Phousi from the Nam Khan River side and came down near the royal palace. It costs 20,000 kip. On the way up we passed lots of shrines, Buddha statues in different positions, a large Buddha footprint. There was even a machine gun up near the top of the hill. The views from the top were lovely and made the climb well worth it. We went up during the day preferring to see the sunset fom the river rather than from here .

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    Explore the sidestreets.

    by IreneMcKay Written Feb 23, 2013
    Making rice cakes - I think.
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    The main areas for wandering are the riverbanks and the main street, but also take some time to wander down sidestreets where you just might find food drying in the sun and people preparing food or making things. Luang Prabang lends itself perfectly to the aimless stroll.

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    Some fool gave me a machete!

    by planxty Updated Feb 10, 2013

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    planxty cooking, Luang Prabang, Lao.
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    Admittedly, it was a pretty small machete, and they also gave me a small vegetable knife, vegetable peeler, wok, burner and spatula. Are you with me yet? I finally got round to going to Cookery School. I have been promising myself for trip after trip and never managed it, so I enrolled at the Tamnak Lao Cookery School which is attached to the excellent restaurant of the same name, I had done my pre-read and had observed the advice of the Australian lady who owns the place to skip breakfast. What a sound piece of advice that turned out to be, as you will see later.

    As I say, I had done my pre-read so I had some idea of what to expect and also learned a lot about Lao culture which is so bound up in their cuisine. Communal cooking and eating are an essential part of the social fabric here. In fact, the Lao have an expression along the lines of "food eaten alone never tastes good." I would have to agree to disagree on that one, as the food I have had here is uniformly superb but you get the idea. The class was full at 12 people, about an equal mix of men and women, some couples and four singles. Poor old Liz, a late 20's (I guess) Australian drew the short straw and got me. She was really nice about it, and we got on like a house on fire. By about the third dish we were just doing things without even discussing them, we had got it down fairly well.

    A quick introduction with the two instructors Leng Lee (the thin one) and Phia Yang (the not quite so thin one). I cannot speak highly enough about these guys, they were superb. At the end of the day I asked the owner if they had started out as chefs and she told me they weren't chefs at all, she had picked them for their communication skills (and obvious patience) and they had gone from there. As (H)mong, they would not even have cooked these dishes much, if ever, as their tribe has a different cuisine. I found this incredible given the quality of the food they dished up all day.

    Into a couple of tuk tuks and off to market, the big Phousi Market on the outskirts of town. I love roaming about markets but it is always difficult trying to find out what unusual things are due to the language barrier but Leng very patiently explained what things were, and what they were used for in cooking. The one that amazed me was what he called spicy wood. It looked like lumps of dead wood about two inches in diameter. Aparently, the Lao grate it and use it in cooking as it has a chilli like taste. It was also a working trip. When Leng was giving us the guided tour, Phia was off buying the produce we were going to be using that day and came back laden with plastic bags full of all kinds of things.

    Back to base, and the fun really began. Donning a very fetching pinafore decorated with elephants we gathered round whilst Leng demonstrated Lang Prabang salad. As the name suggests, it is a local delicacy and I had a delightful version of it yesterday. This could not be simpler and includes the simplest "mayonnaise" in the history of cooking. Well, they call it mayo but it isn't really although I do urge you to try this recipe at home, it is so quick and simple apart from the boiling of a few eggs. Don't worry, I am not going to set down every recipe in detail. LP salad is a salad of mixed leaves and the local watercress (use any leaves you have and UK watercress would be good). Make the mayo, which consists of two egg yolks, two tablespoons of oil and the same of white vinegar, one tablespoon sugar, 1/2 teaspoon white pepper and 1/4 teaspoon salt. Then beat the life out of it in a mortar and pestle or use a blender. Dress the leaves with some of it and reserve some. Arrange the salad on the plate andthen pour the remainder of the mayo over the top. Sprinkle some ground unsalted peanuts and a small amount of cooked pork mince (optional) over the top and garnish with coriander. How hard was that? Literally 10 minutes work tops.

    This was to be a feature of the whole day. Nothing they made took more than about 10 minutes to make and by the end we were knocking up dishes in about 15. It really is fast food made with a minimum of equipment and containing a maximum of flavour. I loved the way the guys taught. They demonstrated it thoroughly once and then let you get on with it. While one of them did the washing up (nice touch) the other one was prepping for the next demo. They weren't wandering about watching you although no doubt they would have assisted if you got in trouble. I really do not see how you could though. We were working off a very good recipe book, and the cooking principles are childishly simple.

    OK, this is where the trouble starts, we made that and, after a teabreak, another dish of fried rice noodles with chicken and veg, so that was lunch.

    Outside to eat, and by one o'clock I was stuffed. I do not eat much in the heat of the day here. Back into class and they demonstrated another three dishes of which we had to pick two and then a further two of which we had to pick one. Are you beginning to see the problem here? One thing they demonstrated although we did not make is another local delicacy, Jeowbong, which is LP chilli paste. I like pet (spicy) but even I blanched a bit at a recipe where the first ingredient is 50 dried red chillies. Yes, you read that right. Along with a few other things it makes a paste and would you believe, it is not that hot? Honestly. It keeps for six months in the fridge so there will be a big batch of that on the go when I return home, it is gorgeous and goes with most Lao traditonal food. I am sure the neighbours will be delighted with the smell of the chilli and the twenty or so chopped garlic cloves!

    Without boring you completely with recipes, just a couple more thoughts on what was a truly memorable day. Firstly, Laap Gai (chicken laap) which is one of the most popular Lao dishes, and I love. It requires taking chicken and attacking it, there is no other word, with the machete until it is reduced to almost a paste cinsistency. Liz decreed I looked like the man for the job and I set about with a will. I think she was getting slightly worried by the end of it with my maniacal machete assault. Norman Bates, eat your heart out. Hopefully, the photo will give you an idea.

    I think my favourite of the day was the delightfully named Khua Maak Kheua Gap Moo. Try saying it aloud. It is basically a pork and aubergine dish. I generally don't like aubergine but Liz wanted to cook it so it wasn't a problem and it turned out to be delicious, if I say so myself, I'll definitely be giving that a try at home. Anyone who comes to my house for dinner better watch out.

    Well, by the end of the event I was full to capacity. None of the groups managed to finish the food alrthough someone seemed to think that the guys took the leftovers back to their villages at night which I found sad. Not sure how true that was though.

    At $30 it was a fraction of what I would have paid for a cookery course at home, indeed I would have been happy to pay that amount in London merely for the food itself. If you have the vaguest interest in cooking and / or Lao cuisine, I strongly recommend this place, it really is a superb day.

    Update February 2013.

    I was revisiting this tip today and found I had only attached one image due to internet limitations in Luang Prabang, so I have added a few more now. I must say looking at the results, I genuinely surprised myself. It looks almost edible!

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    Tat Kuang Si Cascades-Luang Prabang

    by kharmencita Updated Jan 14, 2013

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    this is pure natural wonder!
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    One of the most natural attractions in Luang Prabang is the famous “Tat Kuang Si Waterfalls”. It is around 29-40 km away from the City proper. It is a fabulous kind of vast and wide waterfalls tumbling over limestone rock formations that falls into different layers of natural limestone basins creating natural swimming pools. A kind of natural wonder that attracts thousands of tourists and photographers all over the world because of its wonderful cascades formations.
    The admission fee was 20,000 Kip per person.
    It´s 5 to 10 minutes’ walk before we reached and able to see the gorgeous Waterfalls. We climbed up to the higher level of the waterfalls to the top after crossing a wooden bridge there is a path directing you to the other side of the waterfalls. So it means you have to cross the waterfalls. There above awaits a big basin –like hole where you can dip in to refresh and cool yourself. My Boyfriend took this chance but I just left myself behind without crossing the waterfalls. It was slippery for me and I dislike to wet my sandals.
    How we got there? From our Guest house we hired a Motor cycle for a day trip. So we can do and go wherever we wanted to go. It was around 5 Euro in a day. The street was a bit bumpy but enjoyable because we can make photo stops or take some snacks. With our Motorcycle our time was unlimited.

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    Ride through the jungle with an elephant

    by Ramonq Written May 1, 2012

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    Visit one of the elephant camps around the city and you'll have an opportunity to ride around the jungle for around an hour. It's not the most comfortable ride but the view from atop an elephant is great. You even get to cross the river with these beasts of burden and see Laotian life from above.

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    RIVER TRIP TO PAK OU CAVES

    by davidjo Written Mar 2, 2012

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    buddhas everywhere
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    We booked a boat trip the previous night to visit Pak Ou Caves, which is an hour or so up-river. Sit back, relax and enjoy the scenery until you reach the caves which are located in the side of a limestone cliff. There are 2 caves containing 1000's of Buddhas, mostly old but some have been placed there recently. The trip is certainly worth it but a little busy with hoards of other tourists when you arrive there. Unfortunately it was raining the whole time, so i suggest to check the weather out early morning and then book a trip. The boat stops at 'whiskey Village' where you can sample different local alcoholic beverages (make sure that you have a strong stomach lining!). Buy a couple of bottles to take home, it will surely help to unblock your drains! and cheaper than paying for a plumber too!!! Also many of the usual souvenirs are available to haggle over. Bit of a tourist trap but an enjoyable day out.

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    BIG BROTHER MOUSE

    by davidjo Written Mar 2, 2012

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    Big Brother Mouse Bookshops are to be found in several cities in Laos. This is an organisation that sells books to tourists so they can give them to Laotian children on their travels. Local children cannot usually afford to buy a book and many don't possess any, so please purchase a few, only cost 10-20,000 each. Books are translated into the Lao language and will give the benefactor countless hours of pleasure. Many people think they are doing the children a favour by buying candy and giving money, but i think a book is more beneficial. You can also volunteer to teach a few words of english to the students. Search the for there website.

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    Souvenir market

    by davidjo Written Mar 2, 2012

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    The market at Thanon Sisavangvong comes alive around 5pm. The street is closed off to traffic and the locals erect their stalls which sell every kind of souvenir/handicraft available in the country. The place is crowded with tourists searching for a bargain. It is quite easy to bargain them down and don't forget that once you make an offer and they come down to your price it is bad manners to back out.

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    Who is Big Brother Mouse?

    by planxty Updated Jul 19, 2011

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    Big Brother Mouse, Luang Prabang, Lao.

    Big Brother Mouse, a strange name I know. Big Brother Mouse is a charity which specialises in trying to attain literacy in the poorer areas round Luang Prabang. I had read in the Vientiane Times that 30% of females aged 6 - 25 have never been to school. They commission books for which they need sponsorship and distribute them in the Province but their shop / office / classroom serves as a drop-in centre between 0900-1100 every day except Sunday as a learning facility for Lao people wanting to learn English. This is what happened the first day I went there.

    I speak about ten words of Lao, have no teaching qualification, well no qualifications whatsoever. Many Lao can now speak English as learned at school from Lao teachers but they want to work on pronunciation etc. Heaven forbid there should now be several young men in Lao speaking English with thick Belfast accents! It really could not be simpler. There are a couple of tables, a few maps on the wall and a few childrens English posters of the A is for apple, O is for owl type, and you just sit down, introduce yourself and talk. I am certainly good enough at that.

    I have always respected teachers and now I begin to realise why. I had no classroom plan or whatever they are called, so what to talk about? It really was quite nerve-wracking at first, especially given the natural shyness of the Lao. What do you talk about? There is no guidance at all from the staff there so you just wing it. My "group", although it is all very informal, consisted of three (H)mong lads, two about 20 and one only 12 years old. They were all from far flung villages in Luang Prabang Province and the two elder lads were working in town whilst the youngster was studying at school a few miles out of town. We had two books, an English / Lao dictionary and a book of kids games that Big Brother Mouse produce. So off we went.

    We started with the usual, "What is your name?", "Where are you from?" routine, so I came to Northern Ireland. That had to be shown on the very useful world map on the wall, so it gave me a plan. Northern Ireland - North. All the guys had notebooks which they assiduously wrote things in, so I got out the pen and did the points of the compass, using my guidebook to demonstrate. LP is Northwest of Vientiane etc. That led to compass and sailors / boats etc. and we discussed long tail boats and slow boats on the Mekong. I could not mime or demonstrate sailor so the dictionary came into play. Remember sailor, it becomes a little odd later on.

    So, we had done the compass thing and then I noticed one of the older guys, the quiet one, was wearing an Inter Milan top. I asked if he supported them, trying to start a talk about football which the Lao love, but he told me he had bought it because it was warm! In about 30 degree heat and me sweating profusely, I found this odd. However, I then regaled them with the story of the founding of that club in 1908. The kids play book was then brought into play, so I got the young lad to read aloud from it (it is in English and Lao) and it started to get difficult. It has long been the butt of humour that Eastern Asians confuse our L and R sounds, thereby rendering farang as falang etc. They also have a serious difficulty with the W sound and render it as a V, so a fairly extended session on that, correct pronounciation of walk was the big one.

    We were having a great laugh, and one of the games mentioned in a kids book was "write your name in the air with your bottom". I can just imagine the hilarity this must cause in a village. So, bottom led to the concepts of bottom top and sides, which went well. Then I was writing something in one of the guy's books and I noticed on the opposite pages a drawing of the Golden Gate Bridge, a map of San Fransisco etc. and a Chinese female name. Apparently, one of the large Chinese community in that city had come here to do what I was doing. I explained that San Fransisco was Spanish for Saint Francis. "What is a saint?" was the inevitable question. How do you explain the concept of sainthood to someone with only the scantest knowedge of Christianity? Go on, try it yourself. I think I managed. This is where it gets odd. In the two hours I was there we probably looked up about five words in the dictionary, so we looked up saint, and what was it adjacent to? Sailor, as above. What are the chances?

    Somewhere in the middle of all this I thought to explain how odd a language English was. I did this to make them feel better as they were obviously trying so very hard and it was difficult for them. In fact, their thirst for knowledge was a truly humbling experience, not lost on one who basically squandered the opportunity of a very good education. You English speakers have a go at this. I wrote down BOW and explained it meant a thing you tie on your shoe, bending at the waist, something with an arrow a thing to play a violin with and the front of a boat. Confusing enough until I told them BOUGH as in part of a tree was also pronounced the same as bending at the waist. English is my mother tongue and it confuses the life out of me.

    Then he hit me with another one. "What is Engand and what is Britain?" Here we go again. I am sure there are British passport holders who would struggle to differentiate between Britain, Great Britain and the UK. Cue another trip to the map and a discourse on the political makeup of the UK, the passport being used to demonstrate. Which led to more discussion of the perversity of the English language. I was talking about the visa stamp in my passport for PDR Lao. You are undoubteldy ahead of me already, dear reader. Stamp. What is in your passport, what you put on a letter and what you do with your foot. Three entirely different concepts served by the same word.

    The older, quiet guy asked me another couple of questions and I realised how little I actually know about my own language. He asked what did "somebody" mean and he asked me to explain when to use the word a and the word the. Go on, try it. I know when to use them but was confounded by how to explain it. I tried my best though.

    All too soon the two hour session was over and I have to say I left feeling pretty drained. It is quite hard work, although it really is so rewarding. The looks on their faces are a joy and there is no expectation of you, you don't need to be a formal teacher, although I would suggest you jot down a few topics should the conversation falter. If any of you ever venture this way, I strongly urge you to do this, it costs you nothing except a bit of a taxation on your brain, and the results are so, so wonderful. I didn't want to stick a camera in these young mens faces so you will have to take my word for it. The photo is of the outside of the premises.

    Head Northeast on Sakkaline Road (towards the peninsula) and go past the school on the left. When you come to the 3 Nagas restaurant, turn righ and it is 50 yards on the left.

    1908.

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    Visit the Elephant Village

    by stamporama Written Oct 24, 2010

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    When looking for local tours, there are many stalls that offer various activities like visits to the caves, waterfalls, Mekong boat ride, out-of-town trips, etc. One unique activity that stands out is a visit to the Elephant Village, a government-approved camp where rescued or retired elephants are humanely cared for. You may opt to stay for a few hours or days.

    Since I was in LP for just 24 hours, I availed of their half-day package that included transfers by air-conditioned van to/from the village, an elephant ride around the village and through the river, a boat ride to the Tad Sae waterfalls and back, and a sumptuous lunch. All for US$ 35. I booked the night before and they picked me up the following morning.

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