Unique Places in Laos

  • Ferry across the Mekong, PDR Lao.
    Ferry across the Mekong, PDR Lao.
    by planxty
  • Typical rural road, near Luang Prabang, Lao.
    Typical rural road, near Luang Prabang,...
    by planxty
  • Main office
    Main office
    by Twan

Most Viewed Off The Beaten Path in Laos

  • Venture into the 'Heart of Darkness'...

    by Jaktim Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    A trip down the Hinboun River, Laos, in a motorised canoe...pass into a world that is untouched by 'falang' (foreigners) and has a prehistoric presence that induces the feeling of being in 'Jurassic Park' or 'King Kong' (except luckily without the man-eating monsters themselves) - meet trees tangled in vines and smiley villagers who are keen to welcome in your strange white skin – though mine turned pretty brown after a few hours in the sun. Whilst we spent these scorching daylight hours travelling down the river and confronting features such as Kong lo cave and naked children bathing in the water and waving as we passed, at night my friend and I stayed in wooden village houses on stilts and intimately experienced the Lao culture along with the companionship of our experienced and entertaining Lao translator and our boat driver. See places that have literally never been seen by travellers, or perhaps even humans, before...tramp through luscious forest, clamber your way to waterfalls, watch villagers harvest the yellow rice paddy, enter one of the many valleys that no one has ventured into before as it is surrounded by forested mountains...this was an incredible achievement - accompanied by some Lao villagers and a Biologist with unparalleled knowledge you may even discover some knew species. If you really want to be taken into the real life that exists in these unspoilt, unexplored parts, I cannot urge you enough to get in contact with the 'Timeless Times' guys. It was the best thing I ever did.

    View into the mountain valley Riverside village
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    • Adventure Travel
    • Eco-Tourism

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    By canoe through 7 kilometres of darkness

    by eastridinglass Written Jan 10, 2009

    After a day's journey to reach the village of Kong Lor, we scrambled into thin motorised canoes for a half-hour journey to one of the most fabulous natural sights I’ve ever seen – the cave of Kong Lor. Switching on head-torches, the boat-men steered into its mouth: the light faded and we entered blackness.
    It was amazing to putter slowly through the darkness, with just torchlight showing the walls and roof of the tunnel. I knew it was 7 kilometres, and that seems like a really long way in the dark - in fact it takes the best part of an hour.
    Half-way along, we stopped at a sandy river-beach and scrambled into side-galleries to peer at ancient rock formations. At the other end of the tunnel the boat-men dragged the canoes through shallow rapids, and light beckoned us into the river gorge: there’s a village there which you can only get to through the tunnel – or via a tough half-day hike over the mountain. We could have walked back again over the mountain … but we didn’t … we headed back again through the tunnel, yet another wonderful experience in this astonishing and dramatic country.

    Emerging from the tunnel
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    Whiskey village near the Plain of Jars

    by magor65 Written Aug 9, 2008

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    Many villages in Laos produce rice whiskey called lao-lao. It is a potent drink containing 50-55 % alcohol. Taking into account how widespread this home production is , I was quite surprised not to meet drunken people. Do they have such strong heads?

    We visited a couple of whiskey villages while travelling in Laos. The one near Pak Ou Caves is frequently visited by tourists; the bottles with snakes and scorpions inside are displayed in the stalls and waiting to be bought.
    I much preferred the whiskey village near the Plain of Jars. We were greeted there by an elderly woman, whom we instantly called a 'whiskey grandma'. She kindly showed us around and then poured some whiskey into a tumbler, tilted her head and drank the contents without even touching the tumbler with her mouth. Next she poured some whiskey into the same tumbler and offered it to us. After some hesitation I swallowed a bit. It was strong, with vodka-like taste, and had a quick warming effect, quite welcome in the chilly weather.
    So how is lao-lao made?
    The rice is soaked in water and steamed. Then some rice flour is added and the mixture is put into a clay pot and left to ferment. After about a week fresh water is added and it is left again for another couple of days. After that the rice is boiled in a large pot over the fire. The alcohol vapour is collected at the top and then it drips out of a spout into another jar. Then it is bottled and ready to drink.

    whiskey grandma whiskey grandma again whiskey production

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    Plain of Jars - a secret not solved

    by magor65 Written Aug 1, 2008

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    Plain of jars is still mystifying archeologists. Thosands of stone jars from 1 to 3 metres high are scattered across many square kms. Some are upright, some leaning, some of them have a part resembling a lid. How old are they?, how did they get to this place?, what function did they have? - these questions are still not answered although some theories sound more convincing than others.
    The jars are likely to have been funerary urns, since bones and decorations were found at the sites, as well. Other theories say that they might have served as enormous wine fermenters. As to their age, many historians agree that they must be about 2000 years old.

    Visitors can safely visit 3 major sites (out of about 20), but walking along marked trails is highly recommended. Let's remember about the unexploded bombs left behind in the secret war in 1960's A large bomb crater in site 1 reminds us of the war horror.
    Site 1 is the largest and has the greatest collection of jars. There you can also see the biggest jar of all weighing almost 6 tonnes. My favourite, though was site 3 because of its scenic location on a hill, compact layout and beautiful rural surroundings.

    All travel agents in Phonsavan organize tours to the Plain of Jars. We went there by minivan with six other travellers and a guide. Price - 10US dollars per person. You have to buy a ticket to each site on your own: price - 0.80 US dollars.

    Plain of jars Plain of Jars countryside around the Plain of Jars
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    Phonsavan

    by magor65 Updated Aug 1, 2008

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    The provincial town of Phonsavan is in itself not especially interesting. What attracts visitors (who, by the way, don't come in large numbers) is the mysterious Plain of Jars in the town's vicinity.
    The centre of the town is basically one main street with dull buildings of no historical interest. Phonsavan was actually built in mid 70's to become a capital of Xieng Khoung Province because the old capital was completely destroyed in the secret war. During that war (1964-73) the United States dropped in the area billions kg of bombs. Many of them never exploded and still pose a threat. I was surprised to see how locals use the bomb casings and other remnants for daily purposes, as f.e. fences, tools or plant pots.
    Phonsavan may not be the prettiest town but in a way it is worth visiting. Not crowded with tourists it is a great place to observe how locals live. No Lao market was so interesting to me as the one here - so colourful and authentic. The goods sold there ranged from rats through nestlings to various kinds of seeds and plants that I couldn't identify. Besides, Phonsavan is the only gateway to the fascinating Plain of Jars ...

    We got to Phonsavan from Luang Prabang on our way towards the Vietnamese border. The bus journey took about 10 hours and was an adventure in itself.

    at the local market bomb casings as the restaurant entrance at the local market

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    Bo Y - Attapeu

    by Tellme Written May 7, 2008

    This border has only been recently opened to foreigners. Laos will let you out OK, but don't turn up here if you don't already have a visa in your passport. I did, but it still took about 2 hours for them to process me. Where the Vietnamese side has a real building the Laos side has only a 3 sided wooden hut. Look for the red tablecloth. There is nowhere on the Laos side to buy food or drinks, but you will be able to buy a cell phone card! There is no "offical" money changer either, but if the cell phone people have sold anything that day, they may be able to exchange a little cash for you. From the Attapeu border to Attapeu is another 140km or so through quite undulating roads with next to no traffic. There is nowhere at all to stay between the border and Attapeu town and I only saw 2 places on the roadside where you might be able to buy food and drinks (not bottled water, only bottled beer!)

    Border at Attapeu, Laos Passport scrutinizers, Attapeu Bo Y passport control, Vietnam
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    Tie one on

    by GenuinelyCurious Written May 4, 2008

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    I was honored with a “baci” ceremony where the two eldest males of the family supported my elbows with their fingers while all the women of the house tied strings on to my wrists. The custom is to keep them on until they fall off naturally.

    Not sure what the significance of the event was, but clearly I felt like the honored guest, especially when they topped off the event with a “money tree” with bills and candy followed by a feast for the men of the local finest, which included day-old mystery meat and the local rice liquor.

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    Hang out in a village

    by GenuinelyCurious Written May 4, 2008

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    Like many Lao villages, the ethnic Lao occupied the primer riverside farming land while the ethnic minorities were more upland in marginal lands. I didn’t visit them, but reportedly they were H’mong.

    The Laotians I did stay with made their way mostly with farming and sending to town a rapidly dwindling firewood supply. Some small river fishes seemed to be the major meat source as well as the occasional chicken. I did not see pigs or hogs in the village I stayed in.

    Signs of wealth in the village were: generator electricity (and lights and TV and boom box to plug them into), corrugated iron roofing (vs thatch), concrete as pad for both latrine and water tap. All the homes I saw had water tap and latrine shared at most with one other household. My host had thatch and kerosene lighting.

    Dad worked a night job, elder sister got up before dawn to turn out the sticky rice for the day and mom was on the go all day long. The older son was a novice Buddhist student in Luang Prabang and the younger son was recovering from an injury. Their simple lives were a reminder about how people all over the world just want the best for their families.

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    Go upriver

    by GenuinelyCurious Written May 4, 2008

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    Luang Prabang is a jumping-off point for more remote northern Lao locations for trekking and the like. I only had a short visit there, but my time was mostly spent in Ban Hath Sa, a small village along the banks of the Nam Ou.

    Be prepared for a long-ish, bumpy ride from LP to the boat docks, and unless you’re taking one of the larger, more established boats, they are Lao-sized meaning you could end up with knees in chin a lot of the ride.

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    Trekking with a difference

    by bomobob Updated Feb 27, 2007

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    Are you a cynical curmudgeon who has seen enough of the so-called "hilltribe trekking" in Thailand to know that you'd never do it again? Have you been put off by endless streams of scantilly clad tourists being herded through villages of "never before seen by Westerners" people who hide their TVs and put on their traditional costumes when the minibus pulls up?
    There is a tour company in Luang Prabang caled White Elephant Adventures that really is different from the rest. We stumbled upon them quite by accident in December while strolling through town with no intention at all of going trekking. After a long talk with Derek, the owner (purely coincidental that he's also Canadian), we quickly realize this was different. We arranged a custom 3-day tour of biking, hiking, and kayaking, and the bottom line is that it was brilliant. We went to areas that really are seldom, if ever, visited, and never once felt like voyeurs. On the contrary, in the villages we stayed in, the kids followed us around in a huge crowd, trading songs with us well into the night. There were no "craft villages", no tourist traps, no hordes of tourists...at all. It was a genuinely wonderful experience for us and the people we visited. The guides were locals who acted both as translators and excellent tour guides, sensitive to the cultural and environmental situations.
    These guys are good. Really good.

    Bob

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Cycling
    • Kayaking

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    Wedding festival

    by stedeb Written Jan 10, 2007

    We came across this wedding festival also somewhere between LP & Phonsovan. According to our guide all the young people come to find a husband/wife. They spend 2 days at the festival. We wondered why they were all throwing oranges to each other again according to our guide if you like someone you throw the orange to them if they reciprocate it continues then you are engaged to be married. I am sure it is a little more complex than that but that is how our guide described it. The women were all dressed in their finery and looked stunning. The locals took no notice of us as we wandered around and it had quite a fun fair atmosphere they had variations of stalls that we would see at a fair.

    Stunning costumes Makes the men look very ordinary Dressed in her finery Look closely to see the oranges Watched over by the matriach
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    Local markets

    by stedeb Written Jan 10, 2007

    As we travelled from one destination to another we stopped at several local markets. Now these can be an eye opener and depending on how strong your stomach is can also be quite revolting. However, no matter what your thoughts on what or how they prepare their food etc they are always interesting places to visit. This market we stopped at was somewhere between LP & Phonsovan.
    There were so many varieties of fruit and vegies many we could not identify but if you show an interest the ladies are more than happy to let you try or will try to explain what is what.
    Everything is bought in fresh daily so even though there is a smell it is not a bad smell the fish and meat are all so fresh as you will see from the pics.
    IF YOU HAVE A QUEASY STOMACH DON'T LOOK AT THE PICTURES

    These little piggies went to market Fresh buffalo trotters Not sure what these were Variation on fresh chicken Preparing the meat
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    • Food and Dining

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    Cycling

    by dimitrib Updated Nov 4, 2005

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    Not really off the beaten track, but interesting: Cycle the area around Vang Vieng. Rent a Chinese bicycle and not a mountain bike. The Chinese ones do not look very macho, but are much better quality.

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    The Luxury Bathrooms of Laos

    by AshleeS Updated Aug 8, 2005

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    Well this is it the typical toilet. Let's say for girls it requires a lot of balance, and it is a leg workout. Behind the tile there is water and usually a pot or some sort of scooper to pour into the hole to flush it down. The water is also used by the locals to wash themselves after. This is why you should bring toilet paper and moist toweletts to try to keep clean. (this one is actually pretty clean)

    Bathroom

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    My Little Girl!

    by AshleeS Written Aug 8, 2005

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    We drove 13 hours through the countryside. We would stop along the way and look around. We met this cute little girl who I think is the most cutest thing I have ever seen in my life. We went back to the van and triend to find something to give her. My sister-in-law gave her some gum and I found some jelly beans and we gave them to her and then took her picture and showed it to her. She was so happy by these little gifts that it made me realize what is really important in life. She made my day and my trip. I only wish I asked her what her name was!!!!!!

    She is so cute

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Laos Off The Beaten Path

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